February 23, 2020, 08:35:36 PM

Author Topic: Novel or Anime?  (Read 2214 times)

Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2016, 05:17:55 PM »
That's not always true. Take a look at the fight scenes in The Demon Wars Saga by R. A. Salvatore. I've never read a fight choreographed so beautifully.

Offline TBM

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2016, 06:44:12 PM »
I haven't read that so I can't comment on specifics, but I bet it wasn't trying to compete with visual media for flashy moves and was instead telling the fight in a more poetic, metaphorical style. If thats not the case, you should be able to describe a move like a butterfly kick, with words, and have it be just  as enjoyable as it would be to see it in visual media.

I can't do that. Can you?
« Last Edit: February 14, 2016, 07:11:25 PM by TBM »

Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2016, 10:16:24 PM »
It was very flashy. The fight scenes between elves and the ranger were just beautifully described. It's something you would have to read to understand. As for it competing with visual media, I would say definitely. Although the only thing I can base that on is the descriptive narration of action scenes, which they describe pretty accurately according to sighted people who watch stuff with me.
Like I said, I'm not 100 percent sure. Someone else whose read the books would have to  verify it for me.

Offline TBM

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2016, 12:31:06 AM »
I just read the ranger vs goblins from the Demon Apostle and that wasn't a bad scene. Didn't try to compete with visual media, but it was a nice quick fight with good tempo. The techniques involved were fairly basic.

Pony vs the Behranese Man however is just blow by blow description. Which doesn't work. Especially when a fighting style is unconventional and not intuitively imagined. It becomes difficult to visualize unlike the goblin fight which was fairly straightforward. As the skill level goes up, this technique stops being effective from what I saw.

« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 12:32:43 AM by TBM »

Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2016, 02:44:38 AM »
If you're reading fight scenes out of order, you're more likely to get that type of experience. When you read them in order, you watch these characters learn how to fight, and therefore become familiar with the moves and techniques used. It makes it easier to visualize.

Offline TBM

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2016, 10:01:11 AM »
The issue is a high level fight requires a few things: speed/tempo,  description and continuity. The more description, the more you lose speed. The more speed the more you lose description. There's a limit to how fast someone can read text, especially a blow by blow fight. Regardless of if one reads it on order or not. Therefore the fight progresses more slowly, regardless of if you tell the reader it's happening quickly. It doesn't feel like it's happening quickly. This causes such fights to appear more like a game of chess. Highly strategic, with one trying to out plan the other, also slow as molasses.
Example, when twists of a character's wrist are included, aka a focus on micro movements. That also made it difficult to follow and felt boring. Reading prior fights of a character, aka reading in order may help with continuity, aka following what's happening (provided similar moves are used to prior fights and provided the book isn't put down for very long), but it can't help with the speed issue and the loss of immediacy and excitement.

I don't like the idea of having to refamiliarize yourself with a characters prior fights in order to understand subsequent bouts.

But even if you enjoyed it, such fights are the exception, not the rule.

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/5-essential-tips-for-writing-killer-fight-scenes

 "In reality, though, readers tend to skip over fight scenes – skimming the long, tedious, blow-by-blow descriptions in favour of getting back to the dialogue and character-driven drama that truly engages them in the story."

 Hell what's Bruce Lee without the moves? A shirtless philosopher.  Skipping over a warrior's fight scenes means a huge amount of that warrior's character is simply never seen. Then when the reader's told the warrior is all that, it becomes annoying and feels gratuitous.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 11:55:16 AM by TBM »

Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Novel or Anime?
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2016, 04:12:08 PM »
Interesting. I think this is one of the rare cases where my blindness comes into play. I have no problem with the detailed descriptions of fights, because I rarely get to understand that type of thing in movies and TV shows. So when an author puts in the time to describe every detail instead of the overview(which is how describers do it) it makes a difference. Yes, I can understand how it would slow down a fight for some, but to me it allows me to admire the skill and get a better picture. 
And skipping over sections of a book? :O I didn't skip anything and I made it through A Feast For Crows. I understand zoning out when things get boring, but skipping? What if a character dies in the middle of that scene. Skipping is wrong! :O