March 30, 2020, 08:09:58 PM

Author Topic: Book titles  (Read 1503 times)

Offline Eclipse

  • Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4745
  • Total likes: 2355
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Book titles
« on: March 08, 2017, 07:52:11 AM »
How do there get picked? I've looked up some titles to find books recommended here and some share the same titles with other books. I can't remember now but there was one book which shared the same title with five other books ,I don't think I would be happy if I wrote a book and it shared my title with another book and author.

Just looked up Queen of Blood because Lanko is reading it and three books with same title and another two with similar  title turned up
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 08:02:05 AM by Eclipse »
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Lanko

  • Sherlanko Holmes, Jiin Wei and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Khaleesi
  • *
  • Posts: 2900
  • Total likes: 1979
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Lanko's Goodreads
Re: Book titles
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2017, 10:48:11 AM »
Can't be helped, there's so many possibilities I guess.

Quote
Much like names, slogans and ideas, titles are not protected by U.S. copyright laws (which is why so many books have the same titles). To qualify for copyright protection, a work needs to possess “a significant amount of original expression”—and while “a significant amount of original expression” isn’t fully defined by hard-and-fast rules, the courts have ruled that expressions as short as book titles do not qualify.

This doesn’t mean that you are free to title your next book Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, though. Some titles qualify for trademark protection (specifically, series titles like Chicken Soup for the Soul, Harry Potter, Encyclopedia Brown, etc.). The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states that a trademark protects words, phrases, symbols or designs identifying the source of the goods or services of one party and distinguishing them from those of others. So once a book becomes successful enough to be considered a recognizable brand, it could be eligible for trademark protection.

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/can-you-use-a-book-title-thats-been-used-before

Slow and steady wins the race.

Lanko's Year in Books 2019

Offline Eclipse

  • Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4745
  • Total likes: 2355
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Book titles
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2017, 11:14:42 AM »
Godblind is on it's own. It must be unique!
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline night_wrtr

Re: Book titles
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2017, 03:30:10 PM »
Yeah, this is also annoying when trying to add books to the TBR on goodreads.

Online The Gem Cutter

  • Captain Analogy
  • Writing Group
  • Khaleesi
  • *
  • Posts: 2970
  • Total likes: 2459
  • Gender: Male
  • We've exhausted all possibilities - time to begin.
    • View Profile
    • The Gem Cutter Tales
Re: Book titles
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2017, 04:05:28 PM »
One upside, someone was talking about a book title on FB that I was interested in because the book involved a sorcerer's apprentice like mine. So I found it and bought it. Turns out, I bought the wrong one. But the far more obscure book I actually bought was part of a series that follows the protagonist up through the ranks, with each book titled for the rank "Apprentice", "Novice", etc. I'm glad I discovered that that had been done, so I didn't accidentally replicate.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline Amaranth

  • Coreling
  • ***
  • Posts: 36
  • Total likes: 25
  • Gender: Male
  • The world's a stage and I've forgotton my lines.
    • View Profile
Re: Book titles
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2017, 11:10:20 AM »
Yeah, this is also annoying when trying to add books to the TBR on goodreads.

Amen to that!
If less is more, just think about how much more more would be!

Offline K.S. Crooks

Re: Book titles
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2017, 07:21:15 PM »
It creates incentive to have some type of unique quality to your title- your own land, unique character name, new species, etc. Using the same title could be used to make more people aware of the title or people find your book by accident. It would be prudent to make sure any books with the same or similar titles to what you want wouldn't bring with it negative connotation along.
K.S. Crooks- Author
www.kscrooks.com

Offline Mike Brooks

  • Soulfinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 80
  • Total likes: 53
  • Gender: Male
  • Scifi. Fantasy. Related shenanigans.
    • View Profile
    • My website
Re: Book titles
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2017, 01:01:52 PM »
I think the publisher can normally have some sort of say. My second book was titled 'Dark Sky' instead of 'Dark Skies', not because of the 90s scifi series that I dimly remember, but because there was apparently a scifi horror of that name that came out in about 2013.

Which isn't to say my publisher said "It's called Dark Sky, that's it," they said they didn't want to call it Dark Skies, so I came up with the replacement title that they were happy to run with.
I'm an angel. I kill firstborns while their mamas watch. I turn cities into salt. I even, when I feel like it, rip the souls from little girls, and from now till kingdom come, the only thing you can count on, in your existence, is never understanding why.

http://mikebrooks.co.uk

Offline CameronJohnston

Re: Book titles
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2017, 02:54:15 PM »
Mike Brooks has the right of it. It's an agreement between the publisher and the author, skewed in the publisher's favour since it's their money and them doing the marketing.

The Traitor God & God of Broken Things

Offline B.A.Fleming

Re: Book titles
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2017, 10:16:06 AM »
I've actually tried to avoid the standard book names, so dragons in my book, no dragons in the title; magic in my book, no magic in the title; quest in my book, no quest in the title. I'd prefer a new land, new title, without ambiguous connotations.

Offline AnnaStephens

Re: Book titles
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2017, 08:14:30 AM »
Godblind is on it's own. It must be unique!

Unless of course you google it and discover it's part of a Christian curse - God blind me.

Nice.

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3478
  • Total likes: 2952
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
    • View Profile
Re: Book titles
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2017, 10:10:37 AM »
Godblind is on it's own. It must be unique!

Unless of course you google it and discover it's part of a Christian curse - God blind me.

Nice.

Cor blimey!
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3478
  • Total likes: 2952
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
    • View Profile
Re: Book titles
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2017, 12:20:01 AM »
This book title deserves a little publicity for length and novelty. It dragged me in and was quite a funny book.

Don't Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs She Thinks I'm a Piano Player in a Whorehouse by Paul Carter
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic