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Author Topic: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?  (Read 1801 times)

Offline asabo

Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« on: July 02, 2015, 07:38:27 PM »
I read a lot of marketing advice. The newest buzz is to link up with other authors that write similar works. Then you go about promoting each other's work and supposedly that increases the number of eyes on your own.

So I am starting this topic as a sorting device for those of us that might be interested in getting in touch with other authors on this forum to link our marketing endeavors.

List your genre and anything else important, subgenre, twists, whatever, so that you can find any possible matches.

I write:
1. Near future, post-apocalyptic, no zombies, survivors rebuilding with a touch of paranormal (one bioengineered character is an empath)

2. Cozy mysteries with an ex-addict actor as the amateur detective.
Lethal Seasons - Apocalyptic Science Fiction (no zombies)
http://allthereisandtherestofit.blogspot.com/p/lethal-seasons.html

Offline K.S. Crooks

Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2015, 02:17:41 PM »
I write Young Adult fantasy either in a medieval setting or current. I'm currently working on the sequel to my first novel.
K.S. Crooks- Author
www.kscrooks.com

Offline tebakutis

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Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2015, 10:05:48 PM »
I wish you luck with this! However, I'd be cautious about posting links to the work of or endorsing authors you haven't read yourself. It's probably best to only recommend work you personally enjoy.

I'm not an amazing marketer by any means, but I have gained a few new readers by getting to know established authors whose work I've enjoyed, usually those I've met in person while doing panels at conventions. Rather than us posting "buy this person's book!", our collaboration has typically involved contributing to each other's social media (they might invite me to do a post for their blog, for example) or a book endorsement once the author has actually *read* your book, and is comfortable endorsing it.

I've been fortunate in that several successful authors and editors have enjoyed my book and offered me an endorsement quote, but I only asked after we'd gotten to know each other. It doesn't hurt to ask for a quote once you've established a relationship with another author, but you shouldn't be offended if they can't do it. They may simply not enjoy your genre or not have time to read your book, and you should respect that.

For my part, I try to return the favor less by simply spamming links to buy their book, and more by using their books as as examples on panels (not plugs out the blue - just suggesting their book if its subject matter is pertinent to a question from the audience). The key, I think, is to make sure your promotion seems appropriate to the subject (like, this author's book is a great example of post-apocalyptic fantasy, if you want to read that) and less random (Hey folks, buy this author's book!")

As a reader, I get really annoyed when an author's Twitter feed or Facebook does nothing but spam a link to their book (I unfollow that author so fast) or when most of the author's communication is requests to buy their book, so I try to avoid doing that myself as much as possible. You want to be careful about doing that when promoting other people's work, as well.

Finally (perhaps not totally related, but it's a good tip I received early on) one of the best ways to promote your own book and get readers interested is to come up with a short comparison to other media your readers might have enjoyed. For instance, one of the successful authors I've known for a couple of years describes his first book as "Xena meets Mad Max". That's not only accurate (the book is great) but it makes me want to read it!

Offline asabo

Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2015, 09:07:29 PM »
Thanks Tebakutis. I think you described what I was thinking of in a much better way. My whole point for this topic was for authors to get to know other writers in their genre/sub-genre. I was not thinking of spam-blasting, ugh. Nobody likes that. And I never promote something I haven't read. But I guess I didn't lay that out very clearly.

I have noticed groups of authors online chatting with each other about interesting topics. That and guest blogging is more the sort of thing I was interested in. You are lucky to have gotten to know some successful authors. For those of us who aren't there yet, we need to start lower down the totem pole.

This is not so much marketing as it is increasing your online presence in an interesting way with people who are in the same niche. Does that sound better?
Lethal Seasons - Apocalyptic Science Fiction (no zombies)
http://allthereisandtherestofit.blogspot.com/p/lethal-seasons.html

Offline tebakutis

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Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2015, 01:22:56 AM »
That makes perfect sense. :)

If I can offer a suggestion (as far as networking) - I've met most of the authors I stay in contact with at conventions, typically while doing panels on writing or other topics. If you've already completed a book (self-published or otherwise) there's no harm in contacting sci-fi/fantasy or writing conventions in your general area and seeing if they'd be interested in having you as a panelist, either to discuss the craft of writing in general, or other fannish topics you might be able to talk about (gaming, cosplay, etc).

From my experience, doing conventions is going to cost money, not earn it (the cost of travel and hotels typically outweigh any books you sell, until you're established) but they can still be a great place to meet authors who, as you mention, might write or be interested in the same genres you're writing.

At best, you'll get to mingle in person with other authors and readers, and at worst, the people who run the convention will simply politely decline (which is no big deal).

Offline asabo

Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2015, 11:40:10 PM »
Conventions are fun, but like you say, cost money. Although the last one I went to - Dragoncon - very nearly gave me con-rage. Yikes. It has what, 20,000 people attending? I am a short person and big crowds are difficult for me. And I swear they were all in the lobby of that one hotel. Whew. Not the best experience, but I bought a great t-shirt!

I imagine as a presenter it's a little different. I might think about that after I finish book 2 in my trilogy. All my spare time and discretionary income is tied up in that right now. I can start researching what's near and appropriate. Thanks for the tip.
Lethal Seasons - Apocalyptic Science Fiction (no zombies)
http://allthereisandtherestofit.blogspot.com/p/lethal-seasons.html

Offline tebakutis

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Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2015, 03:12:30 PM »
Ugh, DragonCon. I went as a guest in 2013 (primarily for game design) and man, I could not get ANYWHERE. The crowds were unreal. I know it's a very popular/prestigious con, but honestly, I'm not sure I'd ever go again. It's just too loud, too hard to navigate, and way too hard to get things done.

Small to mid-sized cons are the ones I most enjoy.

Offline CameronJohnston

Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2015, 03:30:05 PM »
Cons are where I have met most of my writer friends, that and Twitter, with crossover between the two. Of course it also helped I have a local writers' circle to start off with.

Huge multimedia genre cons are probably not the way to go to have relaxed chat and get to know people. Certainly in the UK you'd be better off with Eastercon, Satellite Conventions, or Fantasycon as they are pretty relaxed and fun. Nine Worlds and Bristolcon I haven't been to, but they are also supposed to be really good. Then there is World Fantasy Con and Worldcon which are larger, international, writing affairs.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 03:41:06 PM by CameronJohnston »

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Offline tebakutis

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Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2015, 08:23:44 PM »
Quote
Cons are where I have met most of my writer friends, that and Twitter, with crossover between the two. Of course it also helped I have a local writers' circle to start off with.

Heh, it's like we're dopplegangers! I've met pretty much every other speculative fiction writer I know either at a con, or at my local critique group (run by the Baltimore Science Fiction Society). I'm glad you brought up critique circles in particular - that's another place where you're often going to find authors who can support you (and be supported by you) in regards to marketing.

For example, one gentlemen I met through my critique circle reviewed my book on his site, and another let me do a guest blog post on hers. So critique circles are a great networking method to bring up.

Offline asabo

Re: Marketing with other authors - what do you write?
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2015, 04:28:00 PM »
I am very jealous about your critique group. I have a lovely one here in Asheville, but it's for mystery writers. Luckily a few of us write other than mystery and have gotten together. I am hoping to find a few more spec fic writers in the area, but I haven't made a concerted effort to find them as yet.
Lethal Seasons - Apocalyptic Science Fiction (no zombies)
http://allthereisandtherestofit.blogspot.com/p/lethal-seasons.html