January 19, 2020, 02:41:38 AM

Author Topic: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding  (Read 29204 times)

Offline marshall_lamour

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Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #150 on: May 29, 2016, 10:38:04 AM »
Yikes. Got a bone bruise on the top of my foot doing judo the other day. I didn't notice it for hours but when it swelled up, I could have sworn my foot was broken by the pain and stiffness; thought it was, in fact, but the x-rays said no.
Discover the world of Aeva in book one of the Children of Cataclysm series: Sons of Exile

Offline Nora

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Yeah took me around two weeks to stop limping, a whole month to get rid of the pain. Doc said it's because my bruise is right where the tendons involved in WALKING are connected, and it was real dumb of me to keep going to work, but no one would cover my shifts, and the managers thought I was being a little sassy, so it took longer to heal.

Take time off @marshall_lamour, leave it to heal while it's fresh, bone bruises can turn really ugly if not given consideration.
"She will need coffee soon, or molecular degeneration will set in. Her French phrasing will take over even more strongly, and soon she will dissolve into a puddle of alienation and Kierkegaardian despair."  ~ Jmack

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Offline Mr.J

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This is why outside is bad.


Offline ScarletBea

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hehe, mine was done inside.
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Offline Mr.J

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hehe, mine was done inside.
This is why inside is bad.

Offline ScarletBea

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 ;D
That's why you like fantasy then, you live in a parallel world, neither outside nor inside
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Offline Mr.J

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;D
That's why you like fantasy then, you live in a parallel world, neither outside nor inside
Boom.

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But yes, it's pretty much true isn't it? :p

Offline JMack

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Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #157 on: November 21, 2016, 12:15:01 PM »
I've just started reading The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs by Tristan Gooley. (Have your ever read quite so Brit a name as this?  ;D)

So far, really interesting. The author teaches how to observe the natural landscape around us and make predictions about weather, routes to take, and more.

@Gem_Cutter, thought of you when the author wrote
Quote
[my father] was introducing me to a fundamental appreciation of landscape, one shared by everyone that walks close to the edge, from special forces to nomads.

Of course, mention of "close to the edge" gets me thinking about the rock album by Yes, but that's another story.
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Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #158 on: November 21, 2016, 06:14:46 PM »
Heheh, yeah, my life experiences lend a different perspective on landscapes (we call it terrain), and we literally are trained to look at it differently, as always, guided by an acronym:


I never noticed this thread before. Very interesting, especially for a person who began life at 11 as a writer, but chose to go out an acquire some experience, and succeeded. Maybe too much! The more I write the more I realize how little I knew - or at least, I am beginning to begin to understand. But I would do things the same. I can learn about pacing and structure from my desk. Falling out of an aircraft, seeing a landmine detonator being stepped on, gently guiding a terrorist through broken glass so his bare feet don't get cut - that stuff I can't learn at a desk.
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"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline Yora

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Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #160 on: November 22, 2016, 07:09:16 AM »
I'm commenting for the sole purpose of seeing new replies to this thread on my "Show new replies to your posts" tab.  I'm loving lurking on this one.

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #161 on: December 12, 2016, 04:03:38 PM »
was just reading this interview with one of my heroes (kevin kelly) about his new book:
https://slackhq.com/wired-founder-kevin-kelly-on-letting-go-of-ai-anxiety-bcd94e50dedc

these two quotes struck me:
Quote
In my study of technology, I was really surprised to discover that in fact, on the planetary global scale, that there’s been no technology that’s gone extinct. Nothing. There are more blacksmiths alive today than ever before in history. There are more people making telescopes by hand than ever before in history. There are more masters at flint-making, arrowhead-making, than ever. I’m talking about absolute numbers, not percentages.

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Machines will have answers. What humans are good at are questions.

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #162 on: December 13, 2016, 08:04:30 AM »
was just reading this interview with one of my heroes (kevin kelly) about his new book:
https://slackhq.com/wired-founder-kevin-kelly-on-letting-go-of-ai-anxiety-bcd94e50dedc

these two quotes struck me:
Quote
In my study of technology, I was really surprised to discover that in fact, on the planetary global scale, that there’s been no technology that’s gone extinct. Nothing. There are more blacksmiths alive today than ever before in history. There are more people making telescopes by hand than ever before in history. There are more masters at flint-making, arrowhead-making, than ever. I’m talking about absolute numbers, not percentages.

Quote
Machines will have answers. What humans are good at are questions.

@m3mnoch I basically think of you as a mentat.

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #163 on: December 13, 2016, 03:18:57 PM »
it is by will alone i set my mind in motion.

Offline Nora

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Re: Real life experiences and non-fiction sources for better worldbuilding
« Reply #164 on: December 13, 2016, 04:16:22 PM »
This guy in the first quote is a bit overdoing it. Of course some technologies have gone instinct. Just because we have re-mastered a lot of things, does not mean that everything remains to this day.
Besides, there is a very, very fine line between technology and art in the cases he cites.
Is knapping flint a technology, or an art? Because in this case, there is lost knowledge. Even to this day for example, some crafts are going completely extinct. The art of doing hand dyed wool and fabrics from plants and minerals is going down. Many lines of women who practised it did not share their secrets and when they had no apprentice, their knowledge went into flames.
I also doubt that there are more talented ninjas now than 200 years ago. But is the art of using ninja tools and stealthily killing or robbing your targets an art or a technology?

By number there is more of everything, and that includes all the bad things as well.I find his statement a bit questionable. I'm not sure if he's lauding this situation or not.

One might add that absolute numbers are pointless. If today there is more people doing X than 2000 years ago, that might be great, but since there were so few people back then, with so little time/means for pointless luxury, it is likely that that craft was then a lot more widespread and respected.
What does flint knapping bring you today, besides mild recognition in the anthropologist community? People around them probably see them as eccentrics. 10 000 years ago your work had vital value, and a wider proportion of the population knew some of it.
Obviously that doesn't apply to everything, but it just makes me wonder, what is his point with such a comment?
« Last Edit: December 13, 2016, 04:20:15 PM by Nora »
"She will need coffee soon, or molecular degeneration will set in. Her French phrasing will take over even more strongly, and soon she will dissolve into a puddle of alienation and Kierkegaardian despair."  ~ Jmack

Wishy washy lyricism and maudlin unrequited love are my specialty - so said Lady_Ty