November 15, 2019, 01:50:57 PM

Author Topic: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy  (Read 771 times)

Offline m3mnoch

[youtube]HlfRsKPdV0g[/youtube]

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The first lesson is available now, and will provide an introduction to storytelling as well as help you hone your initial creation of things like setting and character. The lessons include both videos and activities for students to complete, and provides a general basis on which to build. The next instalment will focus on Character creation specifically, and others segments will address storyboarding, emotional appeal and more, with releases happening throughout 2017.

https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/15/pixar-offers-free-online-lessons-in-storytelling-via-khan-academy/


Offline SarahW

Re: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 08:47:40 AM »
Oh common, this is Pixar. I think I've written long enough not to need instructions from a formula studio. What next, get writing lessons from James Patterson? Oh wait ... that did happen unfortunately.

But I'm very skeptical of online classes, it might just be a way for them to farm talent.

Offline Rostum

Re: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2017, 12:59:52 PM »
should that be O' come on?

The information is there use it or not the choice is yours...
I would rather see stuff posted than not due to adverse comments. If you are competent beyond needing guidance or sceptical of their motives then this is not for you, but may be of use to others.

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2017, 02:41:46 PM »
Oh common, this is Pixar. I think I've written long enough not to need instructions from a formula studio. What next, get writing lessons from James Patterson? Oh wait ... that did happen unfortunately.

But I'm very skeptical of online classes, it might just be a way for them to farm talent.

so, what you're saying is there's no value in deconstructing the story-making process?  despite 10,000 years of evidence to the contrary?  okay.

Offline JMack

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Re: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2017, 04:55:34 PM »
Did anyone see "Piper", the Pixar short that just won the Oscar.
Incredible.
I'm in for learnin!
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Offline cupiscent

Re: Pixar offers free online lessons in storytelling via Khan Academy
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2017, 07:50:46 PM »
I actually really like the Pixar "rules" of storytelling. I think they're helpful, broadening, supportive and creative.

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#1: You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.
#2: You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be v. different.
#3: Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.
#4: Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___. One day ___. Because of that, ___. Because of that, ___. Until finally ___.
#5: Simplify. Focus. Combine characters. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.
#6: What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?
#7: Come up with your ending before you figure out your middle. Seriously. Endings are hard, get yours working up front.
#8: Finish your story, let go even if it’s not perfect. In an ideal world you have both, but move on. Do better next time.
#9: When you’re stuck, make a list of what WOULDN’T happen next. Lots of times the material to get you unstuck will show up.
#10: Pull apart the stories you like. What you like in them is a part of you; you’ve got to recognize it before you can use it.
#11: Putting it on paper lets you start fixing it. If it stays in your head, a perfect idea, you’ll never share it with anyone.
#12: Discount the 1st thing that comes to mind. And the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th – get the obvious out of the way. Surprise yourself.
#13: Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.
#14: Why must you tell THIS story? What’s the belief burning within you that your story feeds off of? That’s the heart of it.
#15: If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.
#16: What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character. What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against.
#17: No work is ever wasted. If it’s not working, let go and move on - it’ll come back around to be useful later.
#18: You have to know yourself: the difference between doing your best & fussing. Story is testing, not refining.
#19: Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.
#20: Exercise: take the building blocks of a movie you dislike. How d’you rearrange them into what you DO like?
#21: You gotta identify with your situation/characters, can’t just write ‘cool’. What would make YOU act that way?
#22: What’s the essence of your story? Most economical telling of it? If you know that, you can build out from there.

Also, unlike the Patterson "masterclass", this is free. :)