March 19, 2019, 09:24:07 PM

Author Topic: Personal spelling habits  (Read 10080 times)

Offline D_Bates

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2015, 04:44:42 PM »
Sting and Fling are two great examples of where the g at the end works, so yea, I bow down to that one. I still think it's a bit different for a word that is naturally always spelt with ing on the end to merely adding the 'ing' at the end of another word. But then that might just be how I speak. Which is another point. We all speak differently, so how do you define what is the 'correct' version.

For the record, I'm also not advocating removing the g in 'ing'. God no! That would just look stupid :p.

And Jmack, I actually had Cutting originally, before changing it to Slashing for dramatic effect. Chopping is probably better still in light of the ax...e it's associated with!
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Offline Raptori

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2015, 04:48:56 PM »
Sting and Fling are two great examples of where the g at the end works, so yea, I bow down to that one. I still think it's a bit different for a word that is naturally always spelt with ing on the end to merely adding the 'ing' at the end of another word. But then that might just be how I speak. Which is another point. We all speak differently, so how do you define what is the 'correct' version.

For the record, I'm also not advocating removing the g in 'ing'. God no! That would just look stupid :p.

And Jmack, I actually had Cutting originally, before changing it to Slashing for dramatic effect. Chopping is probably better still in light of the ax...e it's associated with!
Yeah, I say "ing" the same way regardless of the word, definitely an accent thing. I have a bit of a weird accent though, some kind of combination of Mancunian, London, Midlands, and Aussie...  ???
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Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2015, 05:22:03 PM »
This is probably because I'm an American, but French seems a thousand times weirder to me. I understand that English is the hardest language to learn, well if you don't count chinese IMO, but French? For example, there's a ton of silent letters that produce a sound made by just one English letter. I just don't get it.

Offline Raptori

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2015, 05:30:34 PM »
This is probably because I'm an American, but French seems a thousand times weirder to me. I understand that English is the hardest language to learn, well if you don't count chinese IMO, but French? For example, there's a ton of silent letters that produce a sound made by just one English letter. I just don't get it.
I wouldn't say English is the hardest language to learn, not even close - from what I can remember it's considered one of the easiest to learn. Obviously it all depends on what your native tongue is, but in general languages like Finnish, Polish, and Hungarian are considered among the most difficult.
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Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2015, 05:31:40 PM »
Aah, I have been lied to all my life. I was told it was English because a lot of grammar is random.

Offline Raptori

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2015, 05:34:53 PM »
Aah, I have been lied to all my life. I was told it was English because a lot of grammar is random.
That'd make it difficult to master, but not necessarily difficult to learn/become fluent. I doubt it'd have been such a successful language globally if it hadn't been relatively easy to pick up to some degree! Other languages are much harder to learn to begin with, from what I've heard.  :)
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Offline ClintACK

Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2015, 08:14:30 PM »
Re: GHOTI
It's flawed, but it's still the most popular and it IS highlighting a problem of the language.
Yeah, would be nice if they could come up with one that highlights the flaw but stays within the rules though!  :P

Bough, Cough, Dough, Rough, Through, and Hiccough.

No two of these rhyme.  The last one hilariously so.


Re: French...

The thing about French that always makes me laugh is that it's a language with a whole set of conjugation and declension endings, none of which are ever spoken aloud.  That just seems nutty. 


Re: Personal spelling habits...

I'm fond of "rooves" as the plural of roof, though I know of no dictionary that agrees with me.

And this week my word processor told me that "cartoonishly" and "startlement" are not real words.  ("Her walk was cartoonishly exaggerated, but certainly eye-catching.")  ("An indrawn breath, not startlement but wonder.")

At the end of the day, a word is a tool to move an idea from one brain into another.  If it does that, it doesn't matter whether it appears in anyone's dictionary.  And spelling is only a problem if it makes the reader pop out of the story.

Offline xiagan

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2015, 08:20:35 PM »
I was told it was English because a lot of grammar is random.
I read this as "without random grammar it wouldn't be English" or "the language needs random grammar to qualify as English".  ;D

English can be weird. It can be understood through tough thorough thought, though.
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Offline xiagan

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2015, 08:22:17 PM »


Love this. Works the same in German, btw.
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Offline Elfy

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2015, 01:59:27 AM »
Lejays17 listens to a podcast, interestingly by an American guy, called The History of English. He examines the root of the English language, which originally comes from the Indoeuropean language, and then was later influenced by Germanic and then Latin. Chaucer was originally advised to not write Canterbury Tales in English, because people regarded it as a 'fad' language and he was told that it would not survive.

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2015, 04:52:06 AM »
Lejays17 listens to a podcast, interestingly by an American guy, called The History of English. He examines the root of the English language, ...
She might like some of David Crystal's books, then. He writes a lot about language for non-professionals, and I've enjoyed learning about it.
My favourite language books are by Guy Deutscher, as he speaks from a point of view similar to mine, not having english as mother-tongue and having (lots more than me) knowledge of other languages - so all the connections are really interesting.
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Offline cupiscent

Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2015, 05:58:21 AM »
The thing that was drummed into me when training as an editor - and that I hold to still - is that clarity is key. You're aiming to have the author's meaning communicated clearly and quickly to as many readers as possible.

So there are a lot of obscure and archaic rules that have fallen out of common usage, or that might have their sticklers, but don't really impede clarity - preposition-ending clauses and split infinitives being two excellent examples. The inner grammarian might flinch, but you know what's being said, so what is the harm?

However, a lot of other rules do impact on meaning. Possessive apostrophes are one where their removal impedes clarity. There's a lot of difference between saying "my sister's children" and "my sisters' children", after all, and if you make it "husband" and not "children", all of a sudden the situation gets very interesting! ;)

Offline Raptori

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2015, 11:44:57 AM »
The thing that was drummed into me when training as an editor - and that I hold to still - is that clarity is key. You're aiming to have the author's meaning communicated clearly and quickly to as many readers as possible.

So there are a lot of obscure and archaic rules that have fallen out of common usage, or that might have their sticklers, but don't really impede clarity - preposition-ending clauses and split infinitives being two excellent examples. The inner grammarian might flinch, but you know what's being said, so what is the harm?

However, a lot of other rules do impact on meaning. Possessive apostrophes are one where their removal impedes clarity. There's a lot of difference between saying "my sister's children" and "my sisters' children", after all, and if you make it "husband" and not "children", all of a sudden the situation gets very interesting! ;)
Yeah I definitely think that's right, and that's generally what I think of as "good writing". I'd rather paint a beautiful picture in a reader's head using simple prose than focus on creative turns of phrase, and I'd always prefer to read the former.  :)
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Offline Elfy

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Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2015, 01:06:18 AM »
The thing that has always thrown me about European languages is the three different words for 'the' depending on the gender of the object, male, female or neuter. How exactly did they arrive at the conclusion that a specific object is masculine, feminine or neutral?

Offline ClintACK

Re: Personal spelling habits
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2015, 02:55:17 AM »
The thing that has always thrown me about European languages is the three different words for 'the' depending on the gender of the object, male, female or neuter. How exactly did they arrive at the conclusion that a specific object is masculine, feminine or neutral?

Particularly in German.  "Girl" is neuter.  (Das Madchen)