June 04, 2020, 02:09:34 AM

Author Topic: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.  (Read 8493 times)

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2014, 10:37:59 PM »
"Foster's: The lager for people who don't actually like lager". I wrote them an email suggesting that as their new slogan, but they never got back in touch. Ungrateful buggers.

So what you are saying is that Fosters are the Mumford and Sons of the beer world?
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Offline Funky Scarecrow

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2014, 10:43:13 PM »
"Foster's: The lager for people who don't actually like lager". I wrote them an email suggesting that as their new slogan, but they never got back in touch. Ungrateful buggers.

So what you are saying is that Fosters are the Mumford and Sons of the beer world?

Let's not go that far! I mean, Fosters is crap but at least you can use it to make snakebite. So far as I'm aware, it's pretty much impossible to vindicate the existence of Mumford & Sons.
I am NOT short. I'm further away than I look.

Offline Elfy

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2014, 11:21:47 PM »


haha, all of the Australians I've known have used the phrase 'mad cunt' quite liberally. I assumed it was common, but I guess not.
Ah yeah. No.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Elfy

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2014, 11:26:51 PM »
Ordering alcohol elsewhere is interesting. Whenever I think of an English pub I always recall a character from an old (70's) English comedy show whose catch cry was 'I'll 'ave half,' I always wondered half of what. I later learned it was a half pint of whatever they drank. It looked like beer.
It doesn't apply as much now, but in Australia most places accepted your order as 'A pot, mate,' which meant a pot of beer, certain size glass. Except in NSW. They had, probably still do, schooners and midis. I once heard a story from a bloke from Sydney who came to Melbourne for business went into a pub and asked for a schooner, got into an argument with the barman, who had no idea what he wanted, it got rather heated and it finally clicked and the barman said, 'You're from Sydney, aren't you?" He wound up getting a pot. From memory a schooner is a pot and a bit and a midi is a little less than a pot.
I will expand your TBR pile.

http://purpledovehouse.blogspot.com

Offline Bardo Thompson

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #34 on: February 21, 2014, 07:57:15 AM »
this sound any better?

“Oi, mate,” he heard himself say to the bartender in a mousy voice, “pints, as in plural.”
The world is a weird place, lets keep it that way.

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2014, 08:57:39 AM »
this sound any better?

“Oi, mate,” he heard himself say to the bartender in a mousy voice, “pints, as in plural.”

If I was a bartender and someone said 'oi' I would ignore them.  And why would you say pints as in plural?
The Real Powers That Be

Offline Idlewilder

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2014, 09:16:40 AM »
this sound any better?

“Oi, mate,” he heard himself say to the bartender in a mousy voice, “pints, as in plural.”

Whoever this character is sounds like either an anti-social oddball or a dick. I've never heard anyone say anything like that in any country/film/situation.
Make Another World.

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #37 on: February 21, 2014, 11:06:22 AM »
I am not quite sure what the point of this thread is anymore. You 've been advised by several people to keep it simple and just have the character say "pint of lager please/ or cheers" but you are completely ignoring us and keep posting more and more ludicrous things for your character to say.  Plus you have spent a week agonising over your character ordering a pint at a bar.   Doesn't seem very effective writing... sorry to be harsh but it's getting a bit irritating now.  Why ask for advice just to ignore it?
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Offline Idlewilder

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #38 on: February 21, 2014, 11:13:00 AM »
If nothing else his pint will be flat.  :o
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Offline Elfy

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #39 on: February 21, 2014, 10:55:57 PM »
Maybe illustrate that the character first attracts the barman's attention and then gives his order: "Two pints, ta mate." I think the amount is essential because plural can mean anywhere from 2 to 200. They have to know the exact amount to fill the order.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Bardo Thompson

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #40 on: February 23, 2014, 08:51:52 AM »
fair enough. thank you for the advice, all who have been willing to give it. I look over them, and listen.
The world is a weird place, lets keep it that way.

Offline Bardo Thompson

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #41 on: February 23, 2014, 08:57:54 AM »
I am not quite sure what the point of this thread is anymore. You 've been advised by several people to keep it simple and just have the character say "pint of lager please/ or cheers" but you are completely ignoring us and keep posting more and more ludicrous things for your character to say.  Plus you have spent a week agonising over your character ordering a pint at a bar.   Doesn't seem very effective writing... sorry to be harsh but it's getting a bit irritating now.  Why ask for advice just to ignore it?

Understandable. I just came on to this thread to see if I could apply a tad of verisimilitude to the language when it takes place in a relatively "real" setting.
And to be fair, I have gone past this point in the story. Not very far, only when the guy in the woman's body breaks a glass against the bar counter and brings it to a guy's throat who called him/her "love".
The world is a weird place, lets keep it that way.

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #42 on: February 23, 2014, 01:20:13 PM »
Apologies for being so direct but really don't over do the local accents. It will just distract from your story and the suggestions you made really were cringe worthy!

Cheers is a nice British word and used regularly by most Brits.
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Offline shep5377

Re: in need of a distinctly British word or phrase.
« Reply #43 on: February 23, 2014, 04:42:27 PM »
If nothing else his pint will be flat.  :o

Chortle.