July 16, 2019, 09:46:02 AM

Author Topic: A nice tip for (budding) writers  (Read 378 times)

Online ScarletBea

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A nice tip for (budding) writers
« on: May 10, 2019, 11:38:59 AM »
From Seth Godin's Blog:

"Time travel is exhausting

If you’re imagining your future and then looking back at today through a rear-view mirror, it can wear you out.

Writing a book (all caps, WRITING A BOOK) or preparing for a TED talk (already in all caps) can paralyze an ordinarily productive person.
At the same time, tweeting is easy for a lot of people.

That’s because Twitter makes the false promise that it’s all about now. Whatever. Write what you’re doing, or feeling, or angry about. It’ll be obsolete in ten minutes. No future, no rear view mirror.

On the other hand, a book feels permanent. It’s not for now, it’s for later. It’s your testament, something for strangers to read.

And so, when you sit to write your book (or your blog, for that matter), you imagine who’s going to read it, one day in the future. And then you reflect from that distant, amorphous place back to now.
Time travel.

Without a doubt, we need to do this now and then. We need the discipline to think hard about the implications of our actions. We need to plan, to envision, to make trade-offs. It keeps us on track, doing work we’re proud of.

But when you find that it’s paralyzing you, it might be better to get back to now. Sit around the campfire and simply tell your story. Your story as of now, for the people who are with you, now."

 :)
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Offline Not Lu

Re: A nice tip for (budding) writers
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 05:38:47 PM »
First (and most important) comment on his ideas: There is no such thing as time travel because there is no such thing as time.  :D

Second thought: Just write the book you want to read. That way you don't have to envision or imagine who your readers might be. Since your reader is you, all you have to do is get up every day and write something that entertains you. So much easier than time travel.

Offline IWFerguson

Re: A nice tip for (budding) writers
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2019, 07:41:39 AM »
What works best for me is to write the first draft for me. Subsequent drafts become a combination of what I want and what the characters want. In the later editing and revising stages, I start to think more about making sense to readers.
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Online ScarletBea

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Re: A nice tip for (budding) writers
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2019, 08:00:36 AM »
At home in the Fantasy Faction forum!

"Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable. Let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all" - Douglas Adams

Offline Skip

Re: A nice tip for (budding) writers
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2019, 04:24:40 PM »
I'd love to write the book I want to read, except....

I'm often surprised by books. Books that I never thought I would enjoy but turns out I loved it. True Grit is my go-to example of this. Even more often am I disappointed by books I would have said I wanted to read.

I count myself fortunate when I can write a book. Period. Just getting the damned thing coherently finished is a triumph.

Whenever I think seriously about the kind of book I like, the language is amorphous, vague, more suggestive than descriptive. Still less is it useful to say I want a book that engages me, transports me, gives me insights. That's what I want, but the information isn't useful in a practical way.

So I just go back to trying to write. Period.

Every image of the Muses shows them as beautiful, graceful women. My Muse is a 350 lb pro wrestler with a bad attitude and a worse costume.