January 18, 2020, 12:05:51 PM

Poll

Have you ever been persuaded to buy an author's books because they tweeted or posted on Facebook?

No, never
25 (53.2%)
Rarely
5 (10.6%)
Sometimes, if their pitch is good
5 (10.6%)
Yes, but not often
10 (21.3%)
Yes, often
2 (4.3%)

Total Members Voted: 47

Author Topic: Twitter/Facebook Marketing  (Read 9717 times)

Offline J. Mark Miller

Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« on: September 17, 2012, 06:09:13 PM »
Looking for some feedback, mainly for my own marketing practices, but also because I'm getting a little worn out by all the marketing and self-promotion I'm seeing on Twitter and Facebook. (Truth in advertising: I'm in the Rarely category as far as my own purchases go.)

What say you?

Offline THElewisdix

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2012, 07:01:14 PM »
I've purchased several books by both self-published and traditionally published authors because of twitter. Maybe not so much of a direct twitter marketing campaign, but because they mentioned that Amazon had a sale or that they were releasing a new short story, etc. I've also purchased books simply because I followed an author on twitter for a while and liked what they had to say. Without the author's twitter presence it's likely I would have never read Progeny, Taming Fire, Control Point, Prince of Thorns, or Blackbirds (just off of the top of my head). At least not until I discovered them on my own.

I have, however, picked up dozens of free ebooks for my Kindle because of marketing campaigns. Be it an author I'm following tweeting about it themselves or seeing the retweet for somebody else. Hope this helps.
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Offline Arry

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Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2012, 07:35:21 PM »
I have not purchased anything because the author was promoting it on a social media site. If it's an author I like and follow, I will already know about their books. However, tweets to book reviews or promotions by a publisher or user could potentially influence me... or at least make a work more familiar, making it more likely to purchase it later on. So to sum it up, neutral parties have more influence on me than someone that has an obvious, vested interest in promoting it. If it's an author I have not read, and I am getting incessant tweets promoting their own books, I'm not about to jump out and buy it. If I see a good review posted somewhere like FF or StaffersMusings, then I might.

I will say there are some authors I have not read, but I find their tweets terribly amusing. They dont mention their books, they just entertain me with their random thoughts. Those authors I may look into reading .... if I find good reviews on their books to support it :)
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Offline Jian

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Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2012, 07:20:33 AM »
I've got a budget and all, plus my dad has the Kindle we share, so it's quite expensive to take a chance on someone over Twitter/Facebook. I've only bought a book that I heard about over Twitter once. And that was Ben Galley's The Written, since he'd helped me out with some free advice previously, and I'd heard a lot of good things about it.

Other than that, I have never purchased a book because of Twitter or Facebook. I just ask someone on FF about it, if I hear a book is good. With the combined collective of everyone on Fantasy Faction, there is no fantasy book left unturned. -insert maniacal laughter-
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Offline Funky Scarecrow

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2012, 11:04:08 PM »
Never as a result of direct marketing style tweets, but certainly on more than one occasion if the author happens to be entertaining/interesting/thought provoking in the course of standard tweeting. Examples include Chuck Wendig, Sophia McDougall and Mark C. Newton. It's a slow burning and very indirect sort of marketing, if you want to call it that, but I'm prone to falling for it. If I'm interested in you, or the version of yourself you present to the world at any rate, then chances are I'll be interested in what you write. The same thing very much applies with blogs, as well.

I can't speak for facebook, since I deleted my account and barely bothered to look at it when I had it in the first place.
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Offline K.Trian

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Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2012, 12:17:29 PM »
Perhaps not directly based on a tweet but if, indeed, the author comes across interesting via Twitter or Facebook. Then I check out their works superficially, maybe read what "laymen" have said about them on Amazon, then get the book if it still intrigues me.

Usually I find novels to read based on a like-minded friend's recommendation. I rarely buy anything based on professional or semi-professional book reviews, especially if the reviewer is a) a distinctively negative person b) looks at the world or literature strongly through lenses of a certain ideology/movement (like feminism) c) or both.

Offline JakeTheCyborg

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2012, 11:13:25 PM »
If the book sounds interesting, I'll sometimes check it out. I won't look at it if the author posts something about their book every few hours. It can get annoying sometimes.

Offline Caroline Bott

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2012, 07:12:04 PM »
I tend to buy by author (once I've discovered one). 

Discovery is through:

  • General comments/recommendation on forums
  • Asking for specific sort of author on forums
  • Following through to webpage after seeing an author on a forum (talking sense)
  • Coming across a new author in the town library
  • Following "also boughts" on Amazon


Question to J. Mark - where on Facebook are you getting all the "spam"?   And where do you go on Facebook to look for fantasy or sf books or posts?

Offline rmprioleau

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Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2012, 03:20:50 PM »
I think the key is not spamming the self-promotion. Even I get tired of see all the 'read my book' posts from the same author every 5 minutes. That's a really quick way to get ignored. I will be honest, I used to spam the 'read my book' thing. But I was recently educated on some effective marketing practices that this was a bad thing. Being active in reading/writing communities like these is a great way to meet friends, and perhaps they may be enticed to check out your books.

I went to a recent writers meeting and they were talking about effective ways of promoting your books. The key is to not promote yourself directly a la spamming, but subtly. For example, on Facebook and Twitter, put a picture of your book as the user icon. Rather than make posts about 'read my book', find some books that are similar to yours and tweet them. If they are free books, then that's a bonus. Readers love free books. People will retweet your posts. And look! Your book image is being retweeted to thousands of people! I've gotten more fans this way, and some book sales as a result of people checking out my twitter page (which has a link to my website and my books)

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Offline Phil Norris

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2012, 09:39:46 PM »
I've voted for the Yes, Often option. If it wasn't for Twitter I'd never have discovered the likes of Adam Christopher or Chuck Wendig. Also because of Twitter I've finally read Joe Hill.

If you're talking about self published authors then it was because of Twitter marketing I've discovered Jennifer Williams and Matt Dillon. Jennifer is someone I didn't know before I joined Twitter, Matt I knew before being the co-owner of GeekPlanetOnline.

One rule of thumb is if I get spammed I block, all the above engage those that follow them, the chat, debate, tell (some poor) jokes and are genuine nice people. Sometimes they pimp their work, but they don't ram it down your throat.

Twitter marketing works when done like this. I have had a couple of instances where within seconds of following someone I get DM'd with links to buy their books (none of the above have ever done that), those type of authors don't stay on my follow list for long after.
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Offline shep5377

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2012, 10:24:37 PM »
I've purchased several books by both self-published and traditionally published authors because of twitter. Maybe not so much of a direct twitter marketing campaign, but because they mentioned that Amazon had a sale or that they were releasing a new short story, etc. I've also purchased books simply because I followed an author on twitter for a while and liked what they had to say. Without the author's twitter presence it's likely I would have never read Progeny, Taming Fire, Control Point, Prince of Thorns, or Blackbirds (just off of the top of my head). At least not until I discovered them on my own.

I have, however, picked up dozens of free ebooks for my Kindle because of marketing campaigns. Be it an author I'm following tweeting about it themselves or seeing the retweet for somebody else. Hope this helps.

^ This.

I've only really bought a book once because of the author himself tweeting, and that was Ben Galley. He followed me on twitter and, because I check out people who follow me and he seemed interesting, I followed him. This led me to his website etc, but the main reason I considered his book is that he genuinely interacts with his followers and doesn't constantly tweet about his book all the time. I think any self-pubbed author should look at his marketing style for a little advice.

I will not follow anyone who just tweets about their book (or other people's). I actively avoid their books, if I'm honest. If you are engaging, personable and genuine on your twitter/social media outlet, you've got a good chance of hooking me in.

Besides, this way I have 'spoken' to authors like Ben, Mark Lawrence, Myke Cole, Peter Brett etc. I think that's pretty awesome.

Also, I think it's worth mentioning the value of sites like FF for marketing. As a result of finding this site, I'll be buying the books of some of our members like David Bridger, Hierath (when it comes out), Francis Knight and some of the others. I think Overlord tweeted something like FF has had over 2 million hits the last 2 years? That's pretty good, free marketing!

Offline SunnyE

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2013, 02:53:25 AM »
I don't have much experience on Twitter, but have heard others say they stumble on good books that way. Can anybody tell me some examples of who to follow that give out good book info? I'd like to start following a few to see what's out there. I'm certainly open to buying books that way. Right now, I usually just buy from word of mouth through friends, or by pouring through Amazon reviews, which can be tedious at times.
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Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2013, 04:02:36 PM »
Ye gods, there is a lot of marketing spam on Twitter! I just looked up #fantasy a few minutes ago, and besides people talking about their fantasy football team (who do they think they are, using that hashtag?) I found a never-ending stream of self-promoting tweets by hacks. One author in particular seemed to be tweeting at least every 5 minutes, because she had a dozen identical tweets timestamped within the same hour. Very, very annoying that hashtags like #fantasy are unusable for discussion now.

To the OP:
I've downloaded free books, but I don't know that I've bought a book because of an author's own promotions. I've been made aware of several books indirectly, which is just word of mouth and not specific to Twitter. If you are one of those people instructing Tweetdeck to send out your Amazon link several dozen times a day, kindly stop. And yes, that's a waste of time. You'd be better off joining some kind of writers' circle that chats together using a unique hashtag and then getting retweeted by them.

Offline AnneLyle

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2013, 04:20:42 PM »
The important element in the phrase "social media" is "social" - if you just post messages about your book and rarely interact with people, you'll come across as a spammer. That's really all there is to it.

As I've said elsewhere - social media is a venue to sell yourself, not your books. It's not advertising space, it's networking space.
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Offline scottmarlowe

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2013, 02:49:08 AM »
No, never. My TBR list is already long enough! :-)

Personally, I get kind of tired of the "sell, sell, sell" message that some authors push on Twitter. Most of those ppl who continuously bombard me with their pitch get unfollowed.

Another problem I saw was so many writers were following other writers (and vice versa) to the point that I began to wonder who exactly were they trying to sell their books to?
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