July 11, 2020, 09:52:17 PM

Poll

Have you ever been persuaded to buy an author's books because they tweeted or posted on Facebook?

No, never
25 (53.2%)
Rarely
5 (10.6%)
Sometimes, if their pitch is good
5 (10.6%)
Yes, but not often
10 (21.3%)
Yes, often
2 (4.3%)

Total Members Voted: 47

Author Topic: Twitter/Facebook Marketing  (Read 9967 times)

Offline Mygoditsraining

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2013, 08:37:03 PM »
I've bought books by authors that I've "found" on Twitter, but it has never been because of direct marketing. I joined Twitter and started going to cons because I was looking to broaden my SF/F horizons; what I quickly found was that the books I picked up and enjoyed weren't the ones I encountered via straight-up "buy my book" tweets but more because they were written by people whose virtual company I enjoyed.* As Anne points out, the book is not the brand on Twitter; the author is.

I don't have any problem with someone cheerfully saying "hey, I've got a book out!", but if that's all there is, then I avoid it (and usually them) like the plague. It astonishes me that there are people who completely buy in to the whole "TeamFollowBack"/Direct message spam school of marketing. I have talked to someone who completely and unreservedly believed that DM spam was the key to selling his books, and would not be swayed. Maybe there is something in it? I just don't know. It feels like a particularly soulless and mechanical way of selling anything to me, and I'm happy to leave them to it.

*or they were recommended by the people whose virtual company I enjoyed.

Offline professorbeej

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2013, 05:30:47 PM »
I've purchased several books by both self-published and traditionally published authors because of twitter. Maybe not so much of a direct twitter marketing campaign, but because they mentioned that Amazon had a sale or that they were releasing a new short story, etc. I've also purchased books simply because I followed an author on twitter for a while and liked what they had to say. Without the author's twitter presence it's likely I would have never read Progeny, Taming Fire, Control Point, Prince of Thorns, or Blackbirds (just off of the top of my head). At least not until I discovered them on my own.

I have, however, picked up dozens of free ebooks for my Kindle because of marketing campaigns. Be it an author I'm following tweeting about it themselves or seeing the retweet for somebody else. Hope this helps.

^ This.

I've only really bought a book once because of the author himself tweeting, and that was Ben Galley. He followed me on twitter and, because I check out people who follow me and he seemed interesting, I followed him. This led me to his website etc, but the main reason I considered his book is that he genuinely interacts with his followers and doesn't constantly tweet about his book all the time. I think any self-pubbed author should look at his marketing style for a little advice.

I will not follow anyone who just tweets about their book (or other people's). I actively avoid their books, if I'm honest. If you are engaging, personable and genuine on your twitter/social media outlet, you've got a good chance of hooking me in.

Besides, this way I have 'spoken' to authors like Ben, Mark Lawrence, Myke Cole, Peter Brett etc. I think that's pretty awesome.

Also, I think it's worth mentioning the value of sites like FF for marketing. As a result of finding this site, I'll be buying the books of some of our members like David Bridger, Hierath (when it comes out), Francis Knight and some of the others. I think Overlord tweeted something like FF has had over 2 million hits the last 2 years? That's pretty good, free marketing!

I agree. I think it's incredibly hard to find that balance you talk about. It's one thing to throw up tweets or posts about new sales, hitting a new sales rank, or something like that, but it's something else to just constantly throw out ads into the night.

I think a lot of it can come from getting retweeted, too. I've gained sales from followers of followers from my books, but my own followers very rarely do. I'm trying to refrain from constantly posting just links to the books themselves because of that.

I think the best way, personally, is to talk about how they're doing, what's going on behind the scenes, and get people interested in them so they will go check out the books. I don't think there's anything wrong with talking ABOUT the books, just don't advertise constantly and shout into the night.

Unless it's a special occasion. Like hitting #1 in your Kindle category or having free days, or even a really fantastically good review you'd like to share. Because those become the exception and not the rule, and people may get excited WITH you.


Offline Jaedia

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2013, 12:44:29 PM »
If I'm seeing an author's tweets/Facebook posts, it's because I'm already interested. So no.

I'm more inclined to check an author out if I find them interesting as a person (using Twitter for it's intent - to chat), I see the book around a lot which would incline me to see what all the fuss is about, maybe a giveaway might pique my interest or guest posts or.. something. But not social media spam. If anything that puts readers off.

Offline AEMarling

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #18 on: May 01, 2013, 03:56:01 PM »
I frequently find readers on Twitter by searching the followers of an author I enjoy (Terry Pratchett) and engaging them in whimsical conversations. Having your first book free helps but isn't required if you build a true connection. Another thing that people enjoy more than most spam is the sharing of a beautiful book cover.

As a general rule, only post one self-promotional Tweet/update out of ten. I regret that since the advent of my Kickstarter, that proportion has been distorted.
Touch the sky of human imagination. Read fantasy: http://aemarling.com/
Newly unchained reviewer for Fantasy Faction: http://fantasy-faction.com/author/a-e-marling

Offline Jaedia

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2013, 04:02:55 PM »
As a general rule, only post one self-promotional Tweet/update out of ten. I regret that since the advent of my Kickstarter, that proportion has been distorted.

Yes, agree here. Occasionally and people don't mind, might even retweet for you which would pique the interest of new readers possibly, though as a rule most don't bother looking because there is just SO MUCH of that kind of thing. You want to strive for uniqueness. That's where you'll get new reader interest. Think about where your particular talents lie. Maybe you could start an author blog whose uniqueness and interesting qualities will eventually lead people to go, "Oh, do you read J. Mark Miller's blog? It's amazing!"

You've just got to discover what works best for you.

Offline Rjames112

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #20 on: May 01, 2013, 05:40:54 PM »
I really don't understand the aversion to self promoting authors. It's not as if publishers are putting multimillion dollar budgets toward book promotional campaigns. Authors that promote on twitter and Facebook are really only doing what publishers cannot or will not, and maligning those that do because they are promoting creative work is a little ridiculous.

The best books I have read recently have come from social media promotion, usually a mention from an author I follow: Peter V. Brett promoted Myke Cole, Brandon Sanderson promoted Brian McClellan. Social media promotion of authors by other authors, only serves as the worlds best "staff picks" section.

Offline professorbeej

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2013, 02:18:30 PM »
I really don't understand the aversion to self promoting authors. It's not as if publishers are putting multimillion dollar budgets toward book promotional campaigns. Authors that promote on twitter and Facebook are really only doing what publishers cannot or will not, and maligning those that do because they are promoting creative work is a little ridiculous.

The best books I have read recently have come from social media promotion, usually a mention from an author I follow: Peter V. Brett promoted Myke Cole, Brandon Sanderson promoted Brian McClellan. Social media promotion of authors by other authors, only serves as the worlds best "staff picks" section.

This is very true. I actually started reading Myke Cole because of John Scalzi's recommend. If I see an author I care about support a new writer, I usually at least check out a sample.

So whenever possible, I try to send links to indie authors' Amazon books to get my followers invested in them, too. Hopefully someone will do the same for me, and we all pay it forward.

Offline DjangoWexler

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2013, 06:40:21 PM »
I second (third?) Rjames' point -- I've picked up books based on a tweet or FB post passed along by someone whose opinion I respect.  That said, you're very unlikely to get that kind of recommendation if you're constantly spamming for your book.

I think the problem is that 140 characters is not much room to make a pitch.  I have definitely bought books because someone tweeted a link to, say, a long, thoughtful review that attracted my interest, or an essay by the author that makes the book sound like something I'd like.  Otherwise, what can you say besides HEY MY BOOK IS GOOD, BUY IT?
The Thousand Names -- released July 2!
http://djangowexler.com/book-info/

Offline Jaedia

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2013, 08:00:06 PM »
I thought the point of the topic was "have you ever picked up a book by an author because they tweeted or posted on Facebook" not because somebody you respect did?

Offline DjangoWexler

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2013, 11:41:03 PM »
Often it's a retweet though?  Like if an author I like and follow reads something he/she likes and retweets a post by the author, I'll see it in my feed, and sometimes I'll take a look.
The Thousand Names -- released July 2!
http://djangowexler.com/book-info/

Offline EricaDakin

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2013, 10:37:56 PM »
I must admit I find the whole Twitter thing baffling. I joined up only a week ago, and I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to put on there. I can only really connect to it in the evening, and everything goes by so fast that I can't really keep up with anything. I'm very conscious that just spamming 'buy my book' is counterproductive if anything, so mostly I just sit there and stare at it in abject bemusement.

I've autolinked my blog to it though - there at least I try to post up proper content. Maybe I just need some time to get my head around it...
Butterflies instantly came to life in his stomach, and the little bastards were heavily armed. - The Republic of Thieves.

Offline Jaedia

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #26 on: May 17, 2013, 12:57:18 PM »
I must admit I find the whole Twitter thing baffling. I joined up only a week ago, and I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to put on there. I can only really connect to it in the evening, and everything goes by so fast that I can't really keep up with anything. I'm very conscious that just spamming 'buy my book' is counterproductive if anything, so mostly I just sit there and stare at it in abject bemusement.

I've autolinked my blog to it though - there at least I try to post up proper content. Maybe I just need some time to get my head around it...


Sometimes if you say something and somebody else responds conversations start up, that's when it gets fun. I've found it easiest to set up a list for the people I most want to follow that way it doesn't go by quite so fast and I can catch up, start up conversations, retweet interesting things and so on. :)

Offline Pippa DaCosta

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #27 on: September 05, 2013, 10:11:32 AM »
Twitter is all about the conversation; not about direct sales. To get the best from Twitter you need to engage regularly in real conversations, not just self-promotion. Twitter actually requires a lot more attention than Facebook. Facebook works very well as a static page; you can post and walk away, leaving the message there to do its job. Twitter is a constantly moving, evolving form of networking. The more you engage, the more people are likely to check your profile. As has already been mentioned, leave your web address on your profile but that's it. Spamming your latests hits will get you unfollowed.

Facebook will ask for payment to promote your posts. This also means if you want to reach every one of your likes/fans you'll need to pay as your messages are not distributed to every one of your fans, even if they have liked your page.

Facebook and Twitter are two very different entities and require different means of managing them. However, they are both free, to a certain extent and all that you pay is your valuable time. Twitter requires more time to get the best from it.

Edited to add: try not to link Facebook and Twitter, or link anything to Twitter, as there's nothing worse than an automated post on Twitter. An automated post sticks out like a cop at a lock-in. Don't do it. It completely defeats the purpose of 'real' conversations and again, you'll get unfollowed pretty quickly if you adopt too many auto-tweets.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 10:33:05 AM by Pippa DaCosta »
Check me out at www.pippadacosta.com or follow my journey at http://pippadacosta.wordpress.com  Join the conversation on Twitter https://twitter.com/PippaDaCosta

Offline AnneLyle

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2013, 10:41:39 AM »
Edited to add: try not to link Facebook and Twitter, or link anything to Twitter, as there's nothing worse than an automated post on Twitter. An automated post sticks out like a cop at a lock-in. Don't do it. It completely defeats the purpose of 'real' conversations and again, you'll get unfollowed pretty quickly if you adopt too many auto-tweets.

Depends what you auto-tweet. I use it for blog posts, though a lot of the time I use WP Jetpack's ability to edit the tweet to something more interesting than the post title. I don't mind when others do this, either, as it's less bother than using a separate RSS feed reader. (I only blog once or twice a week, so the auto-tweets make up a tiny proportion of my feed.)

And whilst we're on auto-posting, note that FB prioritises posts made via the FB site (or a FB client app) - sure you can feed your blog RSS into FB, but it won't reach as many fans/friends as it would if you handcrafted a post. Another way that FB are trying hard to drive traffic to their website.
Elizabethan fantasy trilogy The Alchemist of SoulsThe Merchant of Dreams and The Prince of Lies out now from Angry Robot Books!

Offline AndiOConnor

Re: Twitter/Facebook Marketing
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2013, 08:18:19 PM »
I don't even have a Twitter account (I know, everyone take a collective gasp in shock) but I occasionally purchase books from authors I find through Facebook via writing groups. None of the purchases have resulted from the authors' marketing/self-promotion.