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Author Topic: Future of Print Publishing?  (Read 2727 times)

Offline tcsimpson

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Future of Print Publishing?
« on: January 06, 2012, 08:36:43 PM »
So with this statement, this may indeed be the final throes of big print publishing, or is it? http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/barnes-noble-considers-spinning-off-its-nook-unit/ . Does it even make sense for the biggest book store left to make this move?

Offline Michael Sullivan

Re: Future of Print Publishing?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2012, 02:49:54 PM »
So with this statement, this may indeed be the final throes of big print publishing, or is it? http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2012/01/05/barnes-noble-considers-spinning-off-its-nook-unit/ . Does it even make sense for the biggest book store left to make this move?

It makes total sense to me...especially if B&N sees their future to mirror Borders. If nook is with B&N when it goes down then a potential asset will be lost. I look at this as a way to protect this potential valuable asset from the anchor of the retail stores.

Offline tcsimpson

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Re: Future of Print Publishing?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2012, 11:57:10 PM »
Yes, Michael, it seems that they're preparing to go the way of Borders, which is why I made the topic the question that it was. If that indeed happens, what then? where do we buy our print books from? Independents only? PoD setups like CS and LS?

Offline AnneLyle

Re: Future of Print Publishing?
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2012, 04:57:31 PM »
Print books will still be available from Amazon et al, regardless of whether they're produced by POD or conventional offset printing. The production method depends on how many units the publishers anticipate selling through whatever channels, and it remains to be seen if readers continue to want dead-trees editions.

The question is rather, where/how will people find books once the "showrooms" on the high street close? Will it all be online word-of-mouth and social media pimpage? People who have heard about my novel through these routes are pre-ordering the paperback edition through Amazon because it's more reliable than hoping that their local Waterstones or wherever will stock it.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 04:59:13 PM by AnneLyle »
Elizabethan fantasy trilogy The Alchemist of SoulsThe Merchant of Dreams and The Prince of Lies out now from Angry Robot Books!

Offline Silvers

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Re: Future of Print Publishing?
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2012, 02:43:14 PM »
I don't think print will ever disappear completely, unless they make paper illegal along the way. There are plenty of mediums and technologies that were well loved and appreciated in their time that continue to exist in spite of their dominant usurpers (people still ride horses for fun and collect vinyl records obsessively). The difference is that what was once the major medium becomes a high-end niche market.

At least within the current (living) generations, the printed word holds a weight which isn't easily replaced (both figuratively and physically). The smell of a new book, the warmth of holding those pages between your fingers. I don't enjoy cuddling up with my Kindle as much as I do my worn, bendy paperbacks. But cost and convenience will win out in time. And I don't begrudge ebooks. I love them. But there will always be a market for people who love a solid binding and a glossy, gaudily embossed cover to hold and touch. Books will simply get more expensive over time, especially as ebook prices begin to reflect the real cost of their production.

What is bound to happen, as has been the case with the recording industry, is that the traditional publishers will go by the wayside. They've already begun their decline, and their fate will be similar unless they can properly adapt to the changing landscape.
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Offline Michael Sullivan

Re: Future of Print Publishing?
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2012, 10:48:35 PM »
Print books will still be available from Amazon et al, regardless of whether they're produced by POD or conventional offset printing. The production method depends on how many units the publishers anticipate selling through whatever channels, and it remains to be seen if readers continue to want dead-trees editions.

The question is rather, where/how will people find books once the "showrooms" on the high street close? Will it all be online word-of-mouth and social media pimpage? People who have heard about my novel through these routes are pre-ordering the paperback edition through Amazon because it's more reliable than hoping that their local Waterstones or wherever will stock it.

I agree...Amazon will be the main source for print books and the expected sales will determine whether a large print run makes sense or not. Printing has always been a business where high volume = lower cost and POD is pretty expensive on a book by book basis.  Still...if the demand is so low as to not warrant a press run and warehousing - then POD works for all parties involved.

I think blogs will be the "new show rooms" Publishers already hit these guys hard. I heard one blogger say that he got 700 review copies in 2011. There will also be sites that focus on various niches - Mystery...Epic Fantasy...etc etc.