April 27, 2017, 11:43:32 PM

Author Topic: Are there exceptions for BIOGRAPHY and PARODY? Grasping the writhing coattails.  (Read 510 times)

Offline Lady_Ty

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Hi again @SarandonBranderson appreciate your reply, to my comments, I suspect you have gave a harsher  impression than you meant, using 'hate' rather than UK style  'taking the piss' mode. National pastime, don't worry was born and bred in UK, so fully understand where you're coming from there, but big difference.

Certainly would like to pursue Parody and Satire further with you, but RL is intruding and I will get back more fully later, wasn't opting out.

It is particularly interesting just now as two prominent political satirists here in Oz have died recently, one who traded in the blatant with cruel overtones, and another who was probably the best I have ever heard, but decimated his subjects in exquisitely subtle ways.
I imagine arguments being swallowed back, wine spit in glasses and gurgling up bottles. I imagine my ring sliding off my finger, Bobby's lips hot on mine for the first time again, and then unknown to me.
Time doesn't seem to ever be kind. - Nora - Time's Arrow 1750


@Lady_Ty 
NOOOOO! Not Clive James! Clive James is dead?!?!!

Oh wait, no he isn't. Sorry. Minor panic.  Take your time. Looking forward to your return and some more detail on who's passed and the contrast between them.

@The Gem Cutter
Brandon Sanderson is clearly heavily influenced by his study of Korean, but one can't help but notice the pictographic nature of the "Aons" in Elantris which can be (were?) used as a language (by ancient Elantrians?). The 'Allomancy' symbols in Mistborn appear pictographic, but there's definitely more of a pattern in how the spiky and circular brushstroke elements make up each symbol when they're compared to the Aons. They're more like Korean. The Aons are revealed at the end of Elantris to correspond to Geographic or constructed features. (Is that a spoiler? I don't think so? It's just trivia and hinted at early on in the book.) There'll definitely be more detail about how that works, and the relationship between geography and personal names and powers when Sanderson releases the eventual sequel.

Now the stuff going on in "The Emperor's New Brains", sorry, I mean "The Emperor's Soul" seems directly related to Buddhist mandala patterns which originated in India. The idea of carving such a complex pattern into a stamp is interesting. Each person or personality equals one pictographic character.

I keep seeing relationships between Sanderson's language and magic systems and Chinese / Japanese characters. Even in "The Rithmatist".  But maybe I just don't know enough about Korean?

@Bradley Darewood 
I'm always on some sort of roast. Nothing is sacred. I'm like the Jeff Ross of my apartment. Unless Jeff Ross was in it. Then I guess he would be.
I really should listen to Writing Excuses more but I have trouble finding patience for Podcasts because I like to have music blaring around me.
I really want to know more though. Can you hit me with more specific bits of advice Sanderson's given that you strongly disagree with?
Does he approach planning his novels the way those Robert McKee devotees start movie scripts following 'the formula', instead of just writing and then using knowledge of 'the formula' to help adjust parts for dramatic effect?

"Some things we plan, we sit and we invent and we plot and cook up, Others are works of inspiration, of poetry..."
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Online The Gem Cutter

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Brandon Sanderson is clearly heavily influenced by his study of Korean, but one can't help but notice the pictographic nature of the "Aons" in Elantris which can be (were?) used as a language (by ancient Elantrians?). The 'Allomancy' symbols in Mistborn appear pictographic, but there's definitely more of a pattern in how the spiky and circular brushstroke elements make up each symbol when they're compared to the Aons. They're more like Korean. The Aons are revealed at the end of Elantris to correspond to Geographic or constructed features. (Is that a spoiler? I don't think so? It's just trivia and hinted at early on in the book.) There'll definitely be more detail about how that works, and the relationship between geography and personal names and powers when Sanderson releases the eventual sequel.

Now the stuff going on in "The Emperor's New Brains", sorry, I mean "The Emperor's Soul" seems directly related to Buddhist mandala patterns which originated in India. The idea of carving such a complex pattern into a stamp is interesting. Each person or personality equals one pictographic character.

I keep seeing relationships between Sanderson's language and magic systems and Chinese / Japanese characters. Even in "The Rithmatist".  But maybe I just don't know enough about Korean?
My knowledge of Asian languages is limited. Very limited. But a student of Korean at DLI was telling me that there's a matrix of characters that provides consonant/vowel combinations in written Korean. He showed it to me and it's big, like 20 columns and as many rows. I think they borrow from the Chinese for "typed" characters? Anyway, it's a bitch of a language to learn, not unlike Russian, in that Western linguistic concepts are insufficient, as the language has features absent in English and the Romantic languages. They have an honorific form, which I understand in principal but not in detail. Also, they're most often tonal languages, which is like the difference we have between a question's tone and a statement's, but with greater variety and perhaps combinations.

Links between language and land are not uncommon (the real basis of the LotR), usually the "Von Brandenburg naming sort of thing (or the reverse, where the land is named after the person/people, the local industry, etc.).

Researching my WIP involved a study of gemstones, minerals, and crystals, and it's interesting to me how many are named after a person or the first/primary place the mineral is found. Some have names that allude to their properties, well, most have MANY names, but I like the old, forgotten ones, which I've translated from their original languages (usually Greek). There's one I call wyrmstone, because it was called that in Greek because when heated (and if in thin pieces) it will curl up in a unique way, like a worm. Fun stuff.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline JRTroughton

I lived in Korea for 3 years and can read script. Essentially it's written in phonemic blocks.

??


The above says 'jagga' in Korean, or writer. This has two syllabic blocks - jag-ga.You can see there are 5 elements to it, two of which are repeated. There are ch/j (the symbol to the top left) and a (symbol on the far right that is also on the bottom of the first syllabic block). As for the g/k sound? I'll let you figure out which one that is...

This explanation may be terrifically unclear. I've just nabbed one from Wikipedia...

Spoiler for Hiden:
Although the syllable ? han may look like a single character, it is actually composed of three letters: ? h, ? a, and ? n

Korean script is very logical when compared to the maelstrom of nonsense that is English. Probably the simplest in the world to learn. It was created with that very purpose - So that everyone would be able to learn to read and write, including the poor.

Lovely country. Miss it greatly.

EDIT: Hmm. The forum didn't want to post the Korean script. Hmph!

Online The Gem Cutter

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Korean script is very logical when compared to the maelstrom of nonsense that is English. Probably the simplest in the world to learn. It was created with that very purpose - So that everyone would be able to learn to read and write, including the poor.

Lovely country. Miss it greatly.

You'd have been a terrific military linguist, JR. Your post contains a M.A.'s worth of language learning theory. First, any Westerner who can look at a Category IV language and see clarity, purpose, and simplicity has massive talent. Second, your love of the country is the key motivator in successful language learning - desire and interest. And of course, looking back at English, you see its limitations and issues with greater clarity. I felt (and feel) the same way about Russian, whose expanded alphabet makes the language easier, rather than harder.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline JRTroughton

Well, shucks.


I hung out with some Koreans last week for the first time in a while, and it was like a flashback to college parties when they pulled out the silly drinking games with cards and props. The boss Korean gave me a rubber cockroach, which apparently works to scare some Korean girls?

Anyway, this music video:

KOREA!

Brandon Sanderson's church elders couldn't have picked a better place to send him. I think I'm gonna go out for some Bibimbap now.

Now I want to know more about @The Gem Cutter 's work in progress. Why am I thinking of "Amethyst, Princess of Gemworld"?

Online The Gem Cutter

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Not familiar, but I am an old crusty Tolkien fanatic, so there's no accounting for my tastes. So far my language work is ... theoretical, in that I incorporated some (probably outdated) language theory into my magic system.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Online The Gem Cutter

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Speaking of amethyst, meet the Empress of Uruguay, one of the largest, if not the largest amethyst geode in the world.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

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