June 23, 2017, 02:46:23 PM

Author Topic: The Call of Cthulhu  (Read 4492 times)

Offline Yora

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2015, 08:58:07 AM »
Yes, but we have pretty good ideas what to expect there.
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Offline Lady_Ty

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Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2015, 12:13:26 AM »
To those lovers of Cthulhu, there is a strange and unusual book that may be of interest. The House on the Borderlands by William Hope Hodgson published 1908.

Two friends on a fishing holiday find an old diary in ruins of a house, written by the former owner known locally as The Recluse. It is a strange mixture of supernatural, SF and Gothic horror and has many concepts we recognise nowadays, such as visionary space travel and time lapse, and plenty of strange monster type beings.

As the reading of the Recluse’s diary began I thought how much like Lovecraft’s style it was beginning to sound and wondered if those works had been the inspiration, so looked up more about the author and found it to be entirely the other way around, praised by Lovecraft as among his greatest influences.

Not really a Lovecraft fan, but having read some of the books it is a style and content hard to forget. I was impressed that someone had imagined and written something similar first. I'm glad I read it but more as a curiosity than a pleasure, it is most weird but fascinating.
"You have to have an open mind, but not so open that your brain leaks out."    Australian Chief Scientist Alan Finkel replying to persistent science denying Senator.

Offline night_wrtr

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2015, 07:23:25 PM »
The Call of Cthulhu was okay. It was interesting enough for me to try another. Just listened to The Thing on the Doorstep and I enjoyed it very much. Wonderful writing.

Offline SarahW

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2015, 10:09:14 PM »
I remember enjoying and reading Call Of Cthulhu, although it was a bit slowly paced. Granted it seemed like a lot of work at the time was this way. For example I still have trouble getting through the opening on War Of The Worlds.

To its credit was it was much faster than Jerusalem's Lotby King. So it may not be a time period thing.

My aunt's impression was Call Of Cthulhu was to fantasy for her.
It's magic realism, but with more prosthetics.

Offline Yora

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2015, 11:36:23 AM »
It basically is early Urban Fantasy, though with a rather unique style.

I just read that there's a site in America where a lot of really bizare fossils of extremely old age have been found in the 1910s and 20s. Some of them are so strange that people aren't really sure if they are animals or plants, or whether they are are animal or plant at all. And many of them look a lot like Elder Things or the Great Race.

I always find it quite amazing in what a crazy time of science Lovecraft had been working. Physics and astronomy made discoveries even much more mind boggling. We know a lot about the scientists who were researching these things, but Lovecraft is one of the few examples of people having their mind blown about how completely different the universe really is from what humans have always been thinking.
Of course, he clearly was not an average person with a normal mind so everything gets even a bit more bizare in his story. But Philip Dick was even much more insane and he's today regarded as one of the great visionaries of science fiction.
Those tomes of arcane lore that show up in Lovecrafts stories. He was reading them. They were just called scientific journals.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2015, 06:02:20 PM by Yora »
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Offline tebakutis

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Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2015, 09:36:09 PM »
Sorry, I've been waiting to re-post this one for awhile now.

http://www.dorkly.com/post/17969/the-call-of-cthulhu
T. Eric Bakutis: 2014 Compton Crook Finalist and author of Tales of the Five Provinces

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Offline CryptofCthulhu

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2016, 08:24:01 AM »
Given the time he lived in it shouldn't be surprising that he has a certain amount of prejudice.
“Silence is only frightening to people who are compulsively verbalizing.” ~ William S. Boroughs

Offline Yora

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2016, 09:55:10 AM »
But even given his times and location, his perception of strangers was abnormal.
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Offline CryptofCthulhu

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2016, 09:38:46 AM »
Regardless of opinions about Lovecraft, he is one of my go to authors when I'm not in the mood to start a new book. I can re-read his stuff constantly without getting bored. A lot of times I'll have audio versions of his stuff playing in the background while I'm doing things around the house.
“Silence is only frightening to people who are compulsively verbalizing.” ~ William S. Boroughs

Offline CryptofCthulhu

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2016, 09:41:47 AM »
If you wanted to do something similar today, it probably would have to take place in space. On unknown planets or perhaps on ships that travel through strange dimensions of hyperspace.
Not quite as immediate, but to many people today Mars is probably more familiar and feels more close than New Guinea or Antarctica a hundred years ago.

I think the infancy of science back when Lovecraft was writing his stories was a positive as it kept things more mysterious and unexplained.

The Color out of space is a great example of this.
“Silence is only frightening to people who are compulsively verbalizing.” ~ William S. Boroughs

Offline CryptofCthulhu

Re: The Call of Cthulhu
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2016, 09:43:39 AM »

Lovecraft is probably best read for the love of the style, not for the narratives.


I couldn't disagree more. I think he's one of the greatest storytellers in his genre. I can't recall reading his works and not being captivated by the world he created.
“Silence is only frightening to people who are compulsively verbalizing.” ~ William S. Boroughs

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