June 22, 2017, 03:11:26 PM

Author Topic: Norwegian Fantasy  (Read 1922 times)

Offline Ilke

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Norwegian Fantasy
« on: December 11, 2015, 06:31:51 PM »
When you hear about Norwegian literature you most likely think of crime fiction or the few children's books Nesbø(Or Nesbo as the covers usually say in other countries) has written, Ibsen, someplaces Prøysen is pretty popular, Gaarder is for Sophie's World, or Knausgård. But did you know, that Norway has a small group of pretty great fantasy authors?

Ruben Eliassen

Phenomena does have different covers now but I prefer this of the 1st one to the newer edition which is cool, but this one has so much detail!
Phenomena: first released in 2002. Seemingly classic fantasy with chosen ones of a prophecy (but one learn who wrote it for once), a wizard with a long white beard, lots of magic, and multiple creatures. Eliassen however hadn't read any fantasy before it, in the beginning he wanted it to be a picture book as he's an illustrator, but to make it seem 'cooler' Gyldendal said that he should make it an ordinary book (probably just to save money). So the first book is not the best written, but still highly regarded as the series get darker and darker, so people who like lighter moods in their books would probably prefer it. He takes inspiration from the bible, Norse mythology, names, international culture, and history.
Story: For many centuries in Aldra, elves has been the slaves of the Mortok tribe with the help of Tarkan, the idea of evil itself. In hope of freeing the elves, Aldra's king, King Veha, summoned his strongest wizards to write a prophecy called Phenomena about the elves' and country's saviors, two children, one who shall be known as the Prince of Visdom and the other the Daughter of Frost. Centuries later, Sha-ra, one of the last wizards and keeper of the prophecy, accepts to adopt the elven twins Alk and Ilke, whose parents wishes for them to grow up in freedom away from the village they themselves grew up in and has worked as slaves in for all their lives. Together with the winter bear Arol he raise the children, knowing there's a possibility that they are the children mentioned in the ancient script, he prepares them for their duty.

This one is my personal favorite, probably mostly nostalgia filter, but then again, one of my very picky friends has it as his favorite book series even though he first started reading it a few years ago. But the characters are great. Especially Ilke. It's like reading about a real child, as she's curious, finds Sha-ra's teachings boring at times but still manages to catch much of it. She doesn't like admitting that she's scared even when she is and cries, but manages to pull through. So one can see oneself in her. Even though Alk isn't a much interesting character compared to her does he balance it.
Much is happening to Phenomena these last few years. It was to end with the 7th book in 2011, but it didn't feel like an end at all, just a new beginning. Eliassen wrote that if 3000 likes the facebook page he'll continue writing (please like it!!). In very late 2011 or very early 2012 it's film rights was bought up by a new company in Hollywood. Later the script writer came on Twitter (ask him if you wonder about anything) and said he wanted to turn it into a TV-series. Just recently the moodreel was shown on Phenomena's facebook page. There's some talk about translating the books to English, but so far, nothing, but if there's high demand, maybe something happens? It did finally get picture books in 2013, spin-offs based on two of their allies, 6 thin books each, and illustrated by another... Phenomena has been translated into German, Finnish, Swedish and Danish.

Mare(from Mareritt, also known as Nightmare in English): also set to get a filmation by Filmed Imagination, a stop-motion animation this time. Personally I haven't read it yet, but plan to this winter. It's the first of Eliassen's books to not be illustrated by himself. Sorry that I can't cover more on this.

Story: The Carnival is run by a petty crook called Caravaggio, only concerned with two things: making money and keeping the tax collectors at bay. But something tells the greedy man that it might pay off in the long run to let this dark and mysterious lad tag along, even though he keeps threatening to hand him over to the child care authorities.

Mari Moen Holsve:

All of her books so far are set in the Isle Kingdom of Tiladnen, the map is here, it's mainly inspired around norse and greek mythology without adding the gods, as it has it's own gods..! If you wonder about anything about her books can you ask her yourself as she is fluent in English and is the translator of the Donald Duck magazines.

Halvgudene(The Demigods):
A trilogy. It's the only series so far. I like it quite a bit even though the ending was kinda meh. But that's me. It has been translated to Icelandic and Brazilian Portuguese.   

Story: In Oslo some siblings live, the triplets Dina, Balder, and Thea Pedersen who never really have fit in. Always something has been "wrong" about them according to the others. Having a father who's kinda out of it and a passed away mother is not making things any easier. So while Dina does most of the housework does Balder mostly study and Thea sit by the computer chatting with her internet friends. One day Dina notices she walks much faster than usual, Balder gets an headache from wearing his usual glasses, and Thea is more fiery than usual. They notice that they've awakened strange powers, Dina is somehow super strong, Balder can see almost everything, and Thea can create fireballs. They decide to tell their father whom tells them that they're not from Oslo, not from Norway, not from Earth, but from Tiladnen. But there's more than that, their passed away mother was a goddess who was executed for making love with a human. They are now sent back to Tiladnen to help a guild their father was a part of to fight against 'The alliance' who sees as their mission to cleanse Tiladnen of all creatures that aren't human, and only with them helping the guild, they can finally really fight.

Rasp:
Rasp the half devil lives a life with mostly harmless pranks and jokes. Her practical jokes are most often quite innocent, but one day she starts more trouble than she can manage to control - and something which can remind her about guilt gets into her heart when she realizes she could've triggered a whole war. Rasp thinks that a good fight can be mighty fun. But this time is her own tribe threatened - namely the devils. More importantly is t maybe that the whole thing can get bad consequences for herself. As she's gonna try to fix things, Rasp embarks a journey more exciting than any young half devil could ever imagine.

Skjelka-agenten(The Skjelka-Agent):
For a human to be worthy of eternal life must the following criteria be fulfilled: He or She should have lived his or her first sixteen years in a morally, honest, and in a way that cannot be blamed. He or she must then have convinced his or her agent(s) that he or she is worthy of eternal life, and is going to bring happiness to Tiladnen rather than being a pain for everyone who lives there.
HANDBOOK OF THE SKJELKA, §1.1

Down in the ocean bed in the lonely Isle Kingdom Tiladnen, the Skjelka live, a non-organic creature, created by the Goddess Queen. It's only purpose in life is to judge mankind. The Skjelka never surfaces to the humans. The observe them through computers and advanced technology. But something's wrong on the surface; youth die just before their destiny is to be revealed. Both the gods and the Skjelka are terrified. Something has to be done, but none wants to do it - and because of that Mym'Hag, the most useless Skjelka-agent of them all, is sent to Tiladnen with an impossible mission: To find the guilty one.

Tonje Tornes:
She hasn't written much yet, but to not make her seem tiny I added the 1st and 2nd books of the same...
She's mainly a comic editor and one day she felt for writing a fantasy book, so she collected all she could get on the theme of old Norway and fairy tales. She was clearly very inspired by Rowling.

Kire: based on Norwegian fairy tales. It's an urban fantasy, and honestly, makes me think of Harry Potter. Especially later in the first book. I have honestly not read much of the second yet. The writing is okay, not extraordinary but not outright horrible either. It has a few unfortunate implications and stuff but otherwise okay.

Story:
Erik and his mother is hiking in the mountains one day and as they rest a woman come to them. Erik is quickly fascinated by this woman who calls him 'Kire' over and over and slowly starts walking to her. His mother snaps and grabs a knife and throws herself at the woman whom Erik now sees that is actually a hulder who tried to seduce him. Now the hulder is dead, and both mother and son are scared. Worse still! Someone sees them, and his mother is put into a psychiatric hospital for yelling about a hulder, and the only real vitness Erik refuses to speak. His mother is put into the nearest psychiatric hospital to the crime scene, and Erik and his father move to a nearby farm so they can visit her more often. But strange things are happening and later Erik meets another hulder, some strange twins, and sees a dragon sitting on a nearby mountain?!

Siri Pettersen
She has written more than Tornes, but only one series so far so...
Ravneringene (The Raven Rings): I'm gonna start reading this during this winter as well. I've heard it's really good so...

Story: Imagine lacking something that everyone else has. Something that proves you belong to this world. Something so vital, that without it, you are nothing. A plague. A myth. A human.
Fifteen winters old, Hirka learns that she is an Odin's child – a tailless rot from another world. Despised. Dreaded. And hunted. She no longer knows who she is, and someone wants to kill her to keep it a secret. But there are worse things than humans, and Hirka is not the only creature to have broken through the gates…

For more read here.

Sigbjørn Mostue
I dunno the genres of his other books so not adding them.
Alvtegnet (Sign of the Fairies/Elves): Personally not a really big fan of it, but it was well liked by others and it was given out in Poland, so I guess it's good for others?? Like Kire is it based around 'What if Norwegian fairy tales were true?".

Story:  In the summer break Espen goes with his mother to his grandfather's farm. But grandpa has started to become a little corrny, and it's Espen's uncle who's now doing things at the farm. To grandpa's biggest annoyment is uncle Svein (pronounced Swine) chop down the forrest. After a lightning bolt Espen finds a special key in the forest. The key leads Espen to a new world: a alternate reality where the looks are the same, but where trees, animals, and birds can talk, but where nisse, elves/fairies, tusses, and spooks shows up. But there's danger. If the forest is chopped down, will the elves/fairies be defenseless, and the Gravbøygen himself will kill them. They have chosen Espen to fight for them, but Espen doesn't want to. He has always left problems to themselves. But what the evil powers don't know is that a girl is by his side; Eva.

Den Siste Magiker(The last magician):  haven't read it yet, and yes, it's mostly because of uncertainty considering the author.

Story: An innocent prank at the town's original shall be the turning point in the life of Simen Clausen. The man is revealed as a real mage. He's also the last still living mage in the world, and he needs a successor. Simen is the one he choses.

And that's everyone I know of for now. Thanks for your time ^^.




A little note about Knausgård(Or Knausgard on some covers) you should know:
Spoiler for Hiden:
He copies real mail and writes down recordings of phone calls. He does not alter the names. So his books are not fiction. He made his wife go to the a psychiatric hospital because strangers asked her about things she wanted to be private. Then he started to write about that and how sorry he felt for himself who had a wife at a psychiatric hospital. His children constantly change schools to stay safe. He copies real emails into a a document, answers it there without asking the sender of the email if it's okay first. So do not buy his books, buying them would support such abusive behavior! It's like if NSA printed books of the data they have collected on people! Or a psychiatrist or psychologist printing out the papers they got on a patient!
« Last Edit: December 13, 2015, 01:37:58 AM by Ilke »

Offline Lanko

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Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2015, 08:48:13 PM »
Quote from: Ilke

Halvgudene(The Demigods):
A trilogy. It's the only series so far. I like it quite a bit even though the ending was kinda meh. But that's me. It has been translated to Icelandic and Brazilian Portuguese.

Whaat? That got me curious. Checked her pages and it actually is true!

For Rasp ble Holsve nominert til UPrisen 2008. For Halvgudene vant hun Arks barnebokpris 2011, som tidenes yngste vinner (25 år). Halvgudene (første bok i Halvgudene-serien) er også solgt til Island, og hele serien er solgt til Brasil

16. januar 2014: Årets største nyhet så langt: Hele Halvgudene-trilogien blir kjøpt av brasiliansk forlag! Tenk det, Halvgudene på portugisisk. I et VELDIG stort land - Brasil har omtrent 200 millioner innbyggere.
I tillegg har det dukket opp litt flere oppdrag utpå nyåret. Ta en titt under Aktuelt.

But I went to check and there's nothing on Amazon.br. Not surprised, though, things take forever around here. Robin Hobb took 20 years to be released here, for instance.

It's does create some curious feelings that a norwegian author is releasing her books in Brazil and I'm a brazilian writing a story with plenty of elements from norse mythology  ::)

And this Knausgard guy...wow. It seems surreal he does something like that, but it also sparks curiosity to know what the hell he wrote with this kind of material.
"It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

Lanko's Year in Books 2017

Offline Rostum

Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2015, 11:16:53 PM »
I saw the movie of Huldar and thought it was well done. I don't know how it compares to the book? I like non hollywood movies as they rely on plot and acting and not making things explode.


Offline Ilke

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Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2015, 04:13:43 PM »
But I went to check and there's nothing on Amazon.br. Not surprised, though, things take forever around here. Robin Hobb took 20 years to be released here, for instance.

It's does create some curious feelings that a norwegian author is releasing her books in Brazil and I'm a brazilian writing a story with plenty of elements from norse mythology  ::)

And this Knausgard guy...wow. It seems surreal he does something like that, but it also sparks curiosity to know what the hell he wrote with this kind of material.

I looked for it at a Brazillian online book store that sells books to Brazillian people living in USA (dunno how I found it) but didn't find it, so all I can do is to take her and the articles word for it :/

That's awesome! Best of luck to you ^^

Yeah… he really misuses the "free word"… he became millionaire even… gross isn't it? He aparently started writing as he fought his cancer, but last time I saw him on the news he was a chain smoker… when confronted with what he had done to his wife he only replied 'and I have to live with that', self pitying through the whole interview, not even mentioning any family members he has hurt… he aparently has an American fanbase who finds his books very "touching"… sick stuff…

I saw the movie of Huldar and thought it was well done. I don't know how it compares to the book? I like non hollywood movies as they rely on plot and acting and not making things explode.

I don't think it has any movie yet, hulders has popped a bit more into literature and movies lately. I know that there's a hulder movie called Thale, which people have very different opinions on. Personally have I not watched it yet and all I know is that it's not based on Kire.

Offline Rostum

Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2015, 08:38:30 PM »
Sorry the movie I saw was http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2112287/?ref_=nv_sr_1 Thale about Hulder a beastie I know nothing about but the tension was built up well and it made me jump which is more than most horror films achieve. I would happily watch it again and though the scene setting, acting and cinematography had merit.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2015, 08:40:01 PM by Rostum »

Offline Ilke

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Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2015, 10:40:16 PM »
Norwegian film buisness isn't what people are most proud of, mainly because the government doesn't really support creative works at all. The highest grossing (I think that's what's is called??) is this one. I've heard that Norwegian horror is infamous though, and I was told that this one was kinda scary, Død Snø(Dead Snow) is pretty famous though, Troll Jegeren (Troll Hunter) too. I don't really watch horror though, I mainly read it. Most Norwegian movies doesn't have really impressive effects due to lack of support and are mostly filmed in Ireland. Sorry that I can't tell you more on the industry, I dunno much about it.

Here's one Norwegian industy I know a bit more about though:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZobrPA-KHNs" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZobrPA-KHNs</a>

Offline Rostum

Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2015, 01:52:52 PM »
Dead Snow was a very well played if formula Horror Movie, as good as anything out of Hollywood for 10X it's budget. It relied on excellent timing some really dark jokes and good acting. There is a second one, but we wont talk about that.

Offline MJ Kobernus

Re: Norwegian Fantasy
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2016, 12:22:12 PM »
This is an interesting thread. I run a small publishing house in Norway, so Norwegian Fantasy writers are something that I like to keep my eye on.

My issue with the 'Norwegian school' is that not everything gets into English in a timely fashion. They are not pitching to the English markets, which is a shame.

Although I speak Norwegian, I am not 100% fluent, and I find it a challenge to read Norwegian books, so English versions are a must for me.

Sorry to say, however, that many of the more popular books are simply not available. Yet.

But nil desperandum, as they say!

I will just publish my own Norski books. In English!

 

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