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Author Topic: Does proper science fiction still exist?  (Read 2842 times)

Offline Jmack

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Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2015, 05:41:29 PM »
New to the forum, and loved the distinction between hard and soft science fiction.

Maybe in the past scientific predictions were much more for the long term than today. Science today walks at a much more fast pace than in the past and so it becomes difficult to predict truly great innovations for the future. Fifty years ago videoconferencing, travel to Mars and to the moon, micro-cameras, all of that was a dream for the future. What do we have now? Alluding philosophy of science, perhaps we are in a sort of presentification stage of science. That makes it more difficult to write a proper science fiction book.

(still have to read the many recommended books posted here to see if that's true)

"Presentification"? More please. Just tried to scan a bit of text from Phenomenology (god bless Google Books), but it's over my head.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)

Offline Alexandre A Loch

Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2015, 05:52:54 PM »
"Presentification" is a term used by phenomenologists (Husserl and Minkovski) to describe a state where the future is lived as the present. That is, future becomes so close and indistinguishable with the present (actually it is lived as indistinguishable; let's say, psychological time) that both are lived as the same thing. Like a flattening of the time.

(Gee... did that help?  :-\)

Offline Jmack

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Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2015, 06:02:43 PM »
"Presentification" is a term used by phenomenologists (Husserl and Minkovski) to describe a state where the future is lived as the present. That is, future becomes so close and indistinguishable with the present (actually it is lived as indistinguishable; let's say, psychological time) that both are lived as the same thing. Like a flattening of the time.

(Gee... did that help?  :-\)

It's an interesting metaphor for your point.
The question, I think, is whether we've gotten so used to change that we are imagining all the things that can be, or whether we fool ourselves into thinking so. Or conversely, have no real sense for the limits of science. While a bit depressing as an idea, it would be interesting to see science fiction that engages with the limits of technology.

That happens certainly, in our dystopian stories, but they ted more to be about our abuse of science's powers rather than about actual limits.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)

Offline Alexandre A Loch

Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2015, 12:48:10 AM »
"Presentification" is a term used by phenomenologists (Husserl and Minkovski) to describe a state where the future is lived as the present. That is, future becomes so close and indistinguishable with the present (actually it is lived as indistinguishable; let's say, psychological time) that both are lived as the same thing. Like a flattening of the time.

(Gee... did that help?  :-\)

It's an interesting metaphor for your point.
The question, I think, is whether we've gotten so used to change that we are imagining all the things that can be, or whether we fool ourselves into thinking so. Or conversely, have no real sense for the limits of science. While a bit depressing as an idea, it would be interesting to see science fiction that engages with the limits of technology.

That happens certainly, in our dystopian stories, but they ted more to be about our abuse of science's powers rather than about actual limits.

NoteSpelling

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Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2016, 04:29:05 PM »
I have to admit to not noticing a change in Sci-fi as I tend to read lighter Sci-fi that what you are talking about. But there is the Long Earth trilogy (The Long Earth, The Long War and The Long Utopia) by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter which is what I would call 'proper' Sci-fi.

The series is about Joshua Valienté (a natural 'Stepper') and Lobsang, who claims to be a Tibetan motorcycle repairman reincarnated as an artificial intelligence as the map the Long Earth which is a possibly infinite series of parallel worlds that are similar to Earth, which can be reached by using an inexpensive device called a "Stepper". The worlds closest are almost identical to Earth as you get further way from Earth they beging to differ in greater and greater details. The one thing they all share is the fact that there have never been Homo sapiens on any of them.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2016, 04:31:01 PM by NoteSpelling »

Offline lolsroyce

Re: Does proper science fiction still exist?
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2016, 12:15:05 AM »
I must say that technology does not equal SciFi. It's not about inventing (even in a "dreamy" context) premises of future tech, it's about reaction of humans and interaction with that tech. What I mean is SciFi is more about our way of doing things in a different world and surroundings. Kind of like a Star Trek episode where one episode is investigation, the other one is legal battle over does Data have rights even though he is an android, third one is proper military conflict, fourth one is love story with a holograph of a deceased loved one and so on.

I think that SciFi should not be about inventing technologies, but our reaction on new technologies or new situations into which we would be put (colonizing new worlds, meeting aliens, facing destruction or death and so on).

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