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Messages - ultamentkiller

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1816
Writers' Corner / Re: The Absurdity of English in Other Worlds Fantasy
« on: March 13, 2015, 10:26:36 PM »
We can't forget Christopher Paolini. He created two whole languages if I remember correctly.
Just on a side note, I was talking with a friend about how I thought his world building was excellent and actually interesting, which I don't find many authors can do. Most of the time I get bored in descriptions unless there's something heavily unique about the place. We both agree that not many people seem to talk about him, or give him enough credit. Of course this is just my opinion, but I feel like he should be on the list of one of the best authors, but he never seems to pop up. Not only was his story and world building pretty awesome, but his age makes it even more amazing.
Interesting, I've never read Eragon but pretty much everything I've heard about it says it wasn't all that good. Lots of criticism about bad plotting, bad writing, and an unoriginal setting; very little praise that isn't prefaced by mentions of his age...  :-\


Is this a correct plot summary?  :o
Spoiler for Hiden:
Princess flees, trying to keep precious item out of the evil emperor's hands. Boy finds item. Bad guys burn down his farm and kill his uncle. Old mysterious man helps him, and turns out to be part of a secret order of knights to which boy's (now evil) father belonged. Gives boy father's sword and takes him (eventually) to princess, then dies tragically. Boy learns how to fly X-Wings (er, dragons) and goes to take on his father and the evil emperor.
It's much more complex than that. It seems that way at first, but things change drastically. I never thought to compare it to Star Wars, but I guess you could...
It's not necessarily for his plot that I find Inheritance so interesting. It's the world, the characters, the concept... stuff like that. Also, he wrote this when he was a teenager, and for it to be as good as it is, I feel like it just deserves more attention. Is it comparable to Brent Weeks or Brandon Sanderson or any person like that? No, because their plots are superior.
Also, I read it while growing up. So for me, there's the sentimental factor as well. It brings back memories, and is probably the closest I came around that time to a "real fantasy" novel.

1817
Writers' Corner / Re: The Absurdity of English in Other Worlds Fantasy
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:09:17 AM »
We can't forget Christopher Paolini. He created two whole languages if I remember correctly.
Just on a side note, I was talking with a friend about how I thought his world building was excellent and actually interesting, which I don't find many authors can do. Most of the time I get bored in descriptions unless there's something heavily unique about the place. We both agree that not many people seem to talk about him, or give him enough credit. Of course this is just my opinion, but I feel like he should be on the list of one of the best authors, but he never seems to pop up. Not only was his story and world building pretty awesome, but his age makes it even more amazing.

1818
General Discussion / Re: Best battle songs?
« on: March 10, 2015, 03:09:24 AM »
Black Cauldron by Audio Machine. If you haven't heard it, it's perfect! In other words, listen to it now!

1819
I don't know whether to be happy, or sad to see some authors I like not being put on someone's hated list. Is it because they're just that awesome? Or not as popular as I would like? The mystery.

1820
Alright, so here we go.
Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and Warbreaker novels. I heard these were awesome. Picked them up. Boring as hell. I got at least 100 pages into both.
Lord of The rings. I tried it once, couldn't make it. Plus, I hear people tell me about 3 page descriptions of trees as I go on, and that's even more discouraging.
Shadow Saga. The first one was awesome, the second one I got bored through.
Book of The Black Earth. I tried the first one, hated it. Seemed too much like he was trying to rip off avatar and Game of Thrones all at once.
Shadow Ops. It's not as much that I don't like this series, it just amazes me that it's so high on the list of top 50 books. I would hope there was a bunch of stuff better than that.
Mortal Instruments. Just... Why? The first book was alright, the second one really good, but the third one? That ending was awful! So clichet and entirely predictable. It was like watching a bad TV show where they have to keep all the main characters alive, no matter what. And everything has to end happily. No. No no and once again no! I love happy endings, but for the love of God make them interesting.
Sorry, got a bit passionate there.

1821
I think it's less important if I see the rules of a magic system or not, and more important that the author has rules and they don't cheat. Sure, I love seeing how everything works. I think a lot of people do. But there is a certain mystery that serves some plots better than others.
Of course, there's the obvious problem of cheating with a soft magic system. But having a solid one also has a weakness. Most authors choose to have a character new to magic so you can learn with them. I don't have a problem with this, as long as it doesn't start wandering off into all those clichets that I hate. Like you are the chosen one. Or when the author purposefully sets up an impossible task and at the climax of the story, the character does it. Those things make me angry.
And then, when authors can't have a new magic user, they replace it with info dumps. Never fun.
In the end, I agree with what has already been said a couple times. It's all about the execution.

1822
It's been a Joe Abercrombie month for me.
In my quest to finish climbing the must read fantasy mountain, I completed The First Law trilogy and Best Served Cold.
As far as the trilogy goes, I definitely liked it. It surprised me how symbolic of an author he is, and how big of a conspiracy theorist. Or how much he knew about modern politics, depending on your perspective. It didn't necessarily end on a happy note, but not a completely bad one either. It left me with a lot to think about, which is always a good thing.
Best Served Cold did the same thing, but in a different way. It gave me a completely different perspective on vengeance, which not many authors successfully do. Also, out of all of Abercrombie's books that I've read so far, it had the most shocking plot twist.

1823
Introductions / Re: hello
« on: March 02, 2015, 05:41:37 AM »
Welcome!
You better watch Gotham then. It's beautiful.
Welcome. I like Gotham, but I thought it was more about Jim Gordon than Batman and the back stories of the villains that Batman encounters, especially the Penguin, although admittedly because our network TV hates genre we've only seen the first 8 or 10 of it.
You do get to see a bit of Bruce's back story as well, but you are mostly right. However, I still classify it under the Batman category because well... It takes place in Gotham and is full of Batman related origin stuff.

1824
Introductions / Re: hello
« on: March 01, 2015, 05:06:06 AM »
Welcome!
You better watch Gotham then. It's beautiful.

1825
I'm really angry that Aegon won't be present in the show. He's very important in the end.

1826
Writers' Corner / Re: Plotting backwards
« on: February 25, 2015, 04:15:38 PM »
Brent Weeks did this with his Night Angel Trilogy, although I don't think he had the end scene completely planned out.
Brent Weeks already knew where his world was supposed to be at the end of the series. He had started to write another novel, where one of the Night Angel characters briefly shows up. But, he decided that it wasn't any good, and he wanted to tell that Night Angel character's story, presumably Kylar. I think that gave him a bit of an advantage, because you can reread that series once or twice, and there's still foreshadowing that you'll completely miss because it's so well blended.
On the other hand, with his Light Bringer saga, i don't think he's done that. After all, it was supposed to only be a trilogy.
That being said, I think it's nice if you already know your ending, but at the same time, I can't write that way. Sure, I have a general direction of where i want my characters to go and the plot, but in the end, it's more about where they take me. I may have a really good idea for an ending, but sometimes the character doesn't want to go there. Sometimes it's not rational for him to make that choice. So then I either have to force him to go there by not giving him a choice, or change things around to where they still work out in part how I intended, but not always.
know your ending.
I also think it's really different for every author. Some authors can just write and see what happens, others have to make a clear outline of where they want to go and walk it through step by step. In the end, it's more about what works for you. But i guess that's why writing can be so much fun. There's not one way to do it.

1827
I read between 3 and 5 hours on a good day. On weekends, it's anyone's guess. Some weekends I don't read at all, while others I'll spend 10 hours out of my day reading. But, I'm also a high school student with no life.
I normally have to stop reading after about 1 or 2 hours, at least for 15 minutes or so. My butt gets sore from sitting in a chair for a long amount of time.
Now with audio books, it's a different story. I only read one type of audio book, and that's Graphic Audio. That's how I got into fantasy in the first place. With GA, I can read for a whole day and not give a damn.
I wish I could read a 600 page book in a day! But then I guess I would run out of books quickly. Hmm. There's no winning.

1828
General Discussion / Kingsman: The Secret Service
« on: February 15, 2015, 08:09:31 PM »
If you don't know this already, it's opening weekend for this movie!
I just saw it today, and I'm curious to get other opinions on this film.
I really liked it. It kept all the good stuff from the spy movies, and took out all the annoying clichets. It had nice action scenes, good plot twists but nothing shocking, and nice humor.
So what do you think? Give your opinions below!

1829
General Discussion / Re: What's your favorite and least favorite smell?
« on: February 15, 2015, 01:39:55 PM »
Best: Freshly mowed grass.
Worst: Horse manure.
I promise I don't live on a farm. :P

1830
Introductions / Re: Greetings, Fellow Readers
« on: February 15, 2015, 01:35:36 PM »
Welcome!
So I see you're diving straight into fantasy with all of the books that people say you must read. Good choice.
Just a few things I recommend to add on your bookshelf, based on what I've already read, and what's on mine.
 Brent Weeks
Brandon Sanderson, because people talk about his stuff a lot.
Joe Abercrombie
Peter V. Brett
Authors on my Tbr list
Mark Lawrence
Michael J. Sullivan
Sam Sykes
Patrick Rothfuss
I didn't include the authors you mentioned, because that would be redundant.
Have fun with the cliffhanger at the end of book 5 of ASOI&F, and I hope you enjoy this community as much as I do!

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