May 27, 2020, 12:18:22 AM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Elfy

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 406
16
General Discussion / Re: Member birthday calendar
« on: April 10, 2020, 08:32:18 AM »
Happy Birthday to Nora! Hope you can enjoy it.

17
I think you’d also like Jonathan French’s The Grey Bastards, but it doesn’t fit your length criteria, same with Nicholas Eames’ Kings of the Wyld.

18
Writers' Corner / Re: Need a solid word for my Gin & Magic stories
« on: April 10, 2020, 01:43:00 AM »
Flicker is the word that keeps coming up in my head. It’s frustratingly insubstantial and fleeting, just like trying to grab hold of magic can be, and it seems to be a word that people know and fits within the time frame comfortably.

19
Amberlough Dossier by Lara Elena Donnelly. Three books beginning with Amberlough going onto Armistice and finishing with Amnesty. You may also like American Hippo by Sarah Gailey.

20
How many have we got in our secret  anti Sanderson society now ?
I read Mistborn years ago. Thought it ok-ish. Didn't feel the need the read any more by him.
I read Elantris and then Mistborn, didn't connect with either in any way, shape or form and decided that the author wasn't for me. I'm the same with Malazan, read 2 and a half of them and DNF'ed the 3rd one, because it wasn't my thing and I didn't care about any of the characters or their stories.

21
Endings are really hard to get right, especially if a lot of people are invested in the story. There will always be a section that the ending simply won't satisfy. One of my most disappointing endings was Xena, but I didn't feel I'd wasted my time watching it, because yeah the ending sucked for me and there were some dud episodes, but overall I enjoyed watching the show, and it's the same for a book series.

22
Fantasy Movies, Comic Books & Video Games / Re: Locke and Key
« on: April 07, 2020, 06:36:02 AM »
Has anybody else been watching this?
I've just finished season one and really enjoyed it, though it took two espisodes to grab me.
I just finished watching it and thought it was great. Glad it got a second season, because it did end on a bit of a cliff. I felt it was well acted and well made.

23

The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith. The premise of this is brilliant. There are an infinite number of unwritten books, and they all wind up in a corner of hell, being presided over by a succession of librarians. When one of these books gets loose, it's up to the current librarian, her assistant and a young demon to track it down, bring it back and save both heaven and hell in the process. It got a bit confusing at times, but they were fun characters to follow, even the escaped book.


See, I love the premise, but most of the characters veer between doing nothing for me and irritating me. The muse is the one character I actively enjoy. Need to pick this up again and finish it but...

I also tried a number of other books and was bleh about it. Apparently I hate reading right now... or everything I pick is okay at best.
I liked Brevity the most too, although Leto also grew on me. Try The Unlikely Escape of Uriah Heap by H. G. Parry. I ripped through that, of course a book set largely in Wellington, New Zealand is quite a novelty for me to read.

24
General Discussion / Re: If there was a brand new Fantasy TV show
« on: April 06, 2020, 07:36:43 AM »
I actually think fantasy on TV is in pretty good shape. I just finished watching Locke & Key, currently watching The Good Place and started The Umbrella Academy. They’re all fantasy to an extent and all different. It’s a lot more than when if you wanted fantasy on TV you had a choice of Buffy, Charmed and Supernatural.

25
Well I live and work in Scotland, so I hear, and use, Aye quite a lot. Though not as much as wee. Wee is perfect. Much better word than "Small". Plus "Weeer" is brilliant and lots of fun.
I love 'wee' ;D
Kiwi’s seem to use the word ‘wee’ as well.
There was a big Scots presence in the colonisation of NZ - Aus got more English and Irish.
That’s true, although it seemed to centre more in the South Island (ie: Dunedin and the town of Gorr, where they all roll their r’s) and ‘wee’ is used all over on both islands, as is ‘bro’ and that’s an American thing. I’m not sure if they say chooks, though. That may be an Aussie only thing.

26
Well I live and work in Scotland, so I hear, and use, Aye quite a lot. Though not as much as wee. Wee is perfect. Much better word than "Small". Plus "Weeer" is brilliant and lots of fun.
I love 'wee' ;D
Kiwi’s seem to use the word ‘wee’ as well.

27
You'd think in a month where we've been largely confined to being at home most of the time I'd get more reading done, but it hasn't really worked out that way. I did read 6 books though.

Terminal Uprising by Jim Hines. I liked the first one of these Terminal Alliance and I think the sequel was even better. They are largely comedic, but there's enough seriousness and character development in there to get a reader really invested. I think they're the best thing Hines has done so far.

False Value by Ben Aaronovitch. There's something about the Peter Grant books that just pull me in. This one was no exception. I kind of like that he's now moved away from the thread that went through the first lot of books and his exploration of technology was very interesting. Not enough Molly for my tastes, but there can probably never be enough Molly for me.

Imaginary Numbers by Seanan McGuire. Also a departure in that Seanan decided to make her narrator a key character, but not a member of the Price family. We also got a good look at one of the more terrifying creatures (the Cuckoos) that McGuire has created for the InCryptid series. I would have liked more mice, but everyone who reads these wants more mice.

The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold. I know Luke Arnold as an actor (he was Long John Silver in Black Sails and Michael Hutchence in an INXS mini series down here), but he's turned his hand to writing. He's not bad, but he's not that good either. This was readable, but that's as far as it went for me. He probably should stick to acting, he's better at that.

The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith. The premise of this is brilliant. There are an infinite number of unwritten books, and they all wind up in a corner of hell, being presided over by a succession of librarians. When one of these books gets loose, it's up to the current librarian, her assistant and a young demon to track it down, bring it back and save both heaven and hell in the process. It got a bit confusing at times, but they were fun characters to follow, even the escaped book.

Upright Women Wanted by Sarah Gailey. Short, sharp, gritty alternated western, set in world controlled by a repressive regime and how one person who doesn't fit the mould they want, finds another group who also don't fit and carves out a life and a future for herself.


28
General Discussion / Re: The Virus thread
« on: March 29, 2020, 12:15:21 AM »
Do you know if there is a time limit on how  long we can have a walk/run/cycle outdoors for.

I’ve heard on the radio there is a 2km distance rule from your home. Not sure if that’s correct seems a bit short.
Heard a story from a person in France who was stopped by police while going for a walk and told that he was not to go more than a kilometre from his place of origin.

29
The 40 days before Easter. Traditionally, it’s a period of abstinence and prayer. This often turns into “giving up something for Lent.” Like chocolate, or TV, or alcohol. It’s a meaningful time for me as a Christian.

I still wish I hadn’t picked liquor.

Well, technically that still leaves beer, right?
As long as it’s that zero alcohol content stuff, yeah. I assume it also includes communion wine, though?

30
General Discussion / Re: The Virus thread
« on: March 22, 2020, 08:37:39 PM »
The crowds on Bondi beach were ridiculous. The two most populous Australian states have just announced closure of everything "non-essential" as of Tuesday, so here we really go. The panic-buying has just about abated, though I still don't think you can find toilet paper or pasta or rice for love or money. The next period with my four-year-old and my husband (trying to work) at home will be very long, but better than being hospitalised.
I agree with the abating of the panic buying here, although limiting the amount of certain things that people can buy has helped with that. We did find toilet paper, though a week or so back. I think it just depends on when and where you go. It didn't last long on the shelves.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 406