April 07, 2020, 01:31:56 AM

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Messages - Elfy

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1
General Discussion / Re: If there was a brand new Fantasy TV show
« on: April 06, 2020, 10:40:08 PM »
I actually think fantasy on TV is in pretty good shape. I just finished watching Locke & Key, currently watching The Good Place and started The Umbrella Academy. They’re all fantasy to an extent and all different. It’s a lot more than when if you wanted fantasy on TV you had a choice of Buffy, Charmed and Supernatural.

That's hardly answering the question though is it  :P Unless your answer is "So happy with current offering see no need for new shows"

And I have to say, all six of those are contemporary/urban fantasy as is the vast majority of new fantasy programming - from the perspective of someone whose preference is heavily weighted to quasi-historical fantasy, they are basically all the same in that they're of limited interest.
My answer actually is that. From my viewpoint things have never been better in the fantasy TV arena. I do prefer urban fantasy over a lot of the epic stuff, which is very samey to me. If you want quasi historical epic there's The Outpost (got a lot better once it realised the main actor couldn't act, and embraced it's innate silliness), there's also a recent thing called Letter for the King which was very well done. They recently made some new Monkey shows. There's Outlander. It's really a case of looking with a more positive viewpoint.

2

The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith. The premise of this is brilliant. There are an infinite number of unwritten books, and they all wind up in a corner of hell, being presided over by a succession of librarians. When one of these books gets loose, it's up to the current librarian, her assistant and a young demon to track it down, bring it back and save both heaven and hell in the process. It got a bit confusing at times, but they were fun characters to follow, even the escaped book.


See, I love the premise, but most of the characters veer between doing nothing for me and irritating me. The muse is the one character I actively enjoy. Need to pick this up again and finish it but...

I also tried a number of other books and was bleh about it. Apparently I hate reading right now... or everything I pick is okay at best.
I liked Brevity the most too, although Leto also grew on me. Try The Unlikely Escape of Uriah Heap by H. G. Parry. I ripped through that, of course a book set largely in Wellington, New Zealand is quite a novelty for me to read.

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General Discussion / Re: If there was a brand new Fantasy TV show
« on: April 06, 2020, 07:36:43 AM »
I actually think fantasy on TV is in pretty good shape. I just finished watching Locke & Key, currently watching The Good Place and started The Umbrella Academy. They’re all fantasy to an extent and all different. It’s a lot more than when if you wanted fantasy on TV you had a choice of Buffy, Charmed and Supernatural.

4
Well I live and work in Scotland, so I hear, and use, Aye quite a lot. Though not as much as wee. Wee is perfect. Much better word than "Small". Plus "Weeer" is brilliant and lots of fun.
I love 'wee' ;D
Kiwi’s seem to use the word ‘wee’ as well.
There was a big Scots presence in the colonisation of NZ - Aus got more English and Irish.
That’s true, although it seemed to centre more in the South Island (ie: Dunedin and the town of Gorr, where they all roll their r’s) and ‘wee’ is used all over on both islands, as is ‘bro’ and that’s an American thing. I’m not sure if they say chooks, though. That may be an Aussie only thing.

5
Well I live and work in Scotland, so I hear, and use, Aye quite a lot. Though not as much as wee. Wee is perfect. Much better word than "Small". Plus "Weeer" is brilliant and lots of fun.
I love 'wee' ;D
Kiwi’s seem to use the word ‘wee’ as well.

6
You'd think in a month where we've been largely confined to being at home most of the time I'd get more reading done, but it hasn't really worked out that way. I did read 6 books though.

Terminal Uprising by Jim Hines. I liked the first one of these Terminal Alliance and I think the sequel was even better. They are largely comedic, but there's enough seriousness and character development in there to get a reader really invested. I think they're the best thing Hines has done so far.

False Value by Ben Aaronovitch. There's something about the Peter Grant books that just pull me in. This one was no exception. I kind of like that he's now moved away from the thread that went through the first lot of books and his exploration of technology was very interesting. Not enough Molly for my tastes, but there can probably never be enough Molly for me.

Imaginary Numbers by Seanan McGuire. Also a departure in that Seanan decided to make her narrator a key character, but not a member of the Price family. We also got a good look at one of the more terrifying creatures (the Cuckoos) that McGuire has created for the InCryptid series. I would have liked more mice, but everyone who reads these wants more mice.

The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold. I know Luke Arnold as an actor (he was Long John Silver in Black Sails and Michael Hutchence in an INXS mini series down here), but he's turned his hand to writing. He's not bad, but he's not that good either. This was readable, but that's as far as it went for me. He probably should stick to acting, he's better at that.

The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith. The premise of this is brilliant. There are an infinite number of unwritten books, and they all wind up in a corner of hell, being presided over by a succession of librarians. When one of these books gets loose, it's up to the current librarian, her assistant and a young demon to track it down, bring it back and save both heaven and hell in the process. It got a bit confusing at times, but they were fun characters to follow, even the escaped book.

Upright Women Wanted by Sarah Gailey. Short, sharp, gritty alternated western, set in world controlled by a repressive regime and how one person who doesn't fit the mould they want, finds another group who also don't fit and carves out a life and a future for herself.


7
General Discussion / Re: The Virus thread
« on: March 29, 2020, 12:15:21 AM »
Do you know if there is a time limit on how  long we can have a walk/run/cycle outdoors for.

I’ve heard on the radio there is a 2km distance rule from your home. Not sure if that’s correct seems a bit short.
Heard a story from a person in France who was stopped by police while going for a walk and told that he was not to go more than a kilometre from his place of origin.

8
The 40 days before Easter. Traditionally, it’s a period of abstinence and prayer. This often turns into “giving up something for Lent.” Like chocolate, or TV, or alcohol. It’s a meaningful time for me as a Christian.

I still wish I hadn’t picked liquor.

Well, technically that still leaves beer, right?
As long as it’s that zero alcohol content stuff, yeah. I assume it also includes communion wine, though?

9
General Discussion / Re: The Virus thread
« on: March 22, 2020, 08:37:39 PM »
The crowds on Bondi beach were ridiculous. The two most populous Australian states have just announced closure of everything "non-essential" as of Tuesday, so here we really go. The panic-buying has just about abated, though I still don't think you can find toilet paper or pasta or rice for love or money. The next period with my four-year-old and my husband (trying to work) at home will be very long, but better than being hospitalised.
I agree with the abating of the panic buying here, although limiting the amount of certain things that people can buy has helped with that. We did find toilet paper, though a week or so back. I think it just depends on when and where you go. It didn't last long on the shelves.

10
Can’t leave out the Assassin’s Creed books based on the popular video game. While the books have a cast of thousands, Arya, who is training as an assassin, is one of A Song of Ice and Fire’s most popular POV characters.

11
I did 6 books in February, which given that its a slightly shorter month is fairly good going.

The Magnificent Nine by James Lovegrove. This is the second of the licenced Firefly novels. The first one Big Damn Hero tended to focus more on Mal and his past, and with this installment it's Jayne's turn. It was very much The Magnificent Seven in outer space, with the crew of Serenity taking the place of Yul Brynner and Co. Really fun.

Five Dark Fates and Queens of Fennbirn by Kendare Blake. The first one is the conclusion to the highly entertaining and quite dark Fennbirn series and it was rather bitter sweet. The second is a collection of 2 novellas about the world and it's past.

The Resurrectionist of Caligo by Wendy Trimboli and Alicia Zaloga. I loved this! It was set in a secondary world that was reminiscent of our Europe in the 17th century, and had a bit of Dickens thrown in for fun. It follows a princess of the realm and her childhood friend who has been reduced to sourcing cadavers to keep body and soul together. It was just such a well told story, with two great complex central characters.

The Tigers Almanac: 2019 edited by John Harms and Mandy Johnson. Non fiction. A collection of supporter written pieces about the Richmond Tigers Premiership winning season of 2019.

Angel Mage by Garth Nix. A largely YA story set in alternate France in the 18th century, where angels are used as magic. The system was extremely interesting and kind of unique. It had 4 central characters, but only 1 of them is really important to the story and I did find myself wondering why I should be interested in the other 3. Interesting enough to read, but won't live on in my memory as anything particularly special.


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Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: What are you currently reading?
« on: February 29, 2020, 12:34:46 AM »
Grey Bastards by Jonathan French

Overall: +9
Loved it. A refreshing read, which is wildly gripping and totally different from any other book I've read. A roller coaster adventures both geographically and plot-wise keeps moving to keep you stuck to the book.

Freshness: +10
The Lot Lands is a gritty hard place stuck between a semi-hostile kingdom on one side and wild orc hordes on other. A wild west meets sons of anarchy set in fantasyland! Both the setting and the characters plus they way book is written clearly sets itself on a level outside of most other fantasy book out there.

Prose: +10
An unapologetically disgusting and dirty prose that shreds modern political correctness and sensibility expectation on it's way to a wildly entertaining romp. A cascade of vulgarity and lewdness seeps through every page of the book topped with base jokes, that actually make you laugh rather than cringe, which is not an easy balance to achieve! Despite that the book has a nice flow to it and it drags you right in to experience the life on a hog in lotlands right with the characters.

Plot: +8
What starts off as a personal duel rapidly escalates into a far bigger conflict which the author keeps you from guessing till the end. The way the lead character plods through the events trying to find this way, but finding his beliefs yanked repeatedly makes this a obsessive page turner. I have dropped some points on this because of a minor gripe...the books focuses on the protagonist but fails to provide a view of other parties that will be impacted but are not properly covered.

Explicit content:
Los of vulgar speech and base humour. Some explicit but very brief sexual content. Overall good for 18+ audience.
I largely agree with this review, Bender. It was one of my best reads for the year when I read it, and the fact that I picked it up on the off chance made it even better. It does help that I really enjoyed Sons of Anarchy.

13
The Lies of Locke Lamora, said this before, but the city of Camorr is like an extra character in that book.

I've been looking at this sentiment and thinking that I slightly disagree, and trying to put a finger on why. I think it's less a disagree on the sentiment, and more a difference in definitions. I feel in TLoLL, the people of Camorr (as a whole) are vitally important to the book - what makes a Camorri, how they live and interact and the systems they build and support... all of that is hugely important. I feel like the place of Camorr is much less vital - there are settings, obviously, and those settings are unique and well-drawn and bring together a great sense of place, but I don't feel that the story was deeply steeped in that place. People yes, place no.

So that's just making me thing: is a city a place or the people? (The answer, I think, is: yes. But hitherto on this thread I'd been thinking of city as place.)
It’s kind of both in TLoLL. Camorr is a part of them and it has that reputation outside of the city itself.
Spoiler for Hiden:
theres that bit in Red Seas Under Red Skies where the pirate captain is reluctant to take Locke and Jean into the pirate city until Jean mentions that they’re from Camorr, and she immediately acquiesces
. I like all of the books, but I like the first one even more because of Camorr. I doubt the circumstances that created Locke and the Gentleman Bastards could have happened in any other city in that world, because Camorr is kind of unique in its setup.

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General Discussion / Re: If there was a brand new Fantasy TV show
« on: February 24, 2020, 08:16:28 AM »
I would love to watch Drizzt and Malazan on TV.

@Eclipse would probably prefer WoT or Mistborn :P

I would look forward to the 2 hour episode set in the bath tub.
Only one episode? That’ll need its own spin off series.
There have been a couple of really good TV fantasy shows of late, Magicians springs to mind, especially once it goes off book. Although it’s a super hero show Legends of Tomorrow is fantastical as well as being a whole of of fun, although be warned the first season is awful. I’d skip it altogether and start with season 2. I also have high hopes for WandaVision.

15
Locke and Jean are up there, as are Harry Dresden and Karrin Murphy and Peter Grant and Thomas Nightingale. Bronn and Tyrion are also quite fun.

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