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Messages - J.R. Darewood

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1
I've got an idea I like but I don't wth is going on with me and cursed couples atm.  ???

My trend in writing has been everything goes down in flames no matter what anyone does. Just try to survive. Part of me wonders if there is some personal influence there.

Seriously are there any other kind than the cursed kind? F*** romance. F*ing dumbshits

2
Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: LGBT Fantasy?
« on: July 13, 2019, 09:16:30 AM »
1) @mathew wayyyyy more than 4% of dudes (aand girls) stare at my crotch in a given day so if you believe that stat you're either oblivious or the elephant man 2)  "gay agenda"? I have relatives who think "gays shouldn't marry bc then people b will think it's okay to be gay" and even THEY don't use the term "gay agenda" seriously wtf bro do you ev even realize you're a right wing extremist? Wtf is a gay agenda and what kind of dickless a-hole finds it threatening? And $) I'm drink af of of a million caipariñas and piscos in peruv and after a zip line I'm going to mashu Picchu tomorrow so forgive me for being undiplomatic but seriously wtf kind of reply was that BS??? Like idk how to even respond to that.

Anyway there's some french girls asking me to hang out so laterz

3
[MAY 2019] Earth / Re: [May 2019] - EARTH - Voting Thread
« on: July 09, 2019, 06:18:41 AM »

Just took a break and decided to read some of these for fun.  Great job @Nora !  It was fun listening to your music while I read it.

4

I have no answer to this question but suddenly I'm wishing to found a "rotten tomatoes" for books.

5

WoT is the big one for me, and the one that I'd credit with my love of fantasy. It's the one that really pulled me into the genre and made me love big, long books with lots of points of view. And no, I still haven't finished reading the whole series.

Me either. I got stuck on the Sanderson parts

6
Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: LGBT Fantasy?
« on: July 09, 2019, 01:11:20 AM »
Sorry. Doublepost.

And by the way, Matthew, your comment about working in a large place and not knowing many gay people there isn't a very valid argument. I work in a 1000+ place and not only don't I know anybody else openly gay, but I also don't know the 1000+ people from the company. We're actually starting a "Pride employee group" (with straight people) to make life easier for everyone, for example helping people change perceptions.

I should clarify, I work with 500 people, in a place with nearly 800. I'm a trainer so have had prolonged contact with a huge number throughout my time there. It's also a fairly open place in terms of acceptance, the people who are out don't get ostracized or bullied, several are in management positions.

But again, it's just the odds. In any small cast of characters the chances that any are gay is tiny (you've just said you're the only one you know of out of a thousand). I don't mind having queer characters, in the same way I don't mind minority characters, even as MCs, but a lot of people will be put off by it, or more than likely, the author just doesn't think about adding them because it's not in their experience, just as it isn't in most readers.

I do think my overall point has been misunderstood though. I'm only opposed to the hypocrisy of the genre existing at all, when people would be mauled in the media for announcing a book as HETRO. Neither genre is needed to tell a good story. It also feels like a cheap marketing ploy "Here, read this, this character's just like you".

@Matthew check out cupiescent's post I quoted above.  She says it better than me. But consider this: I met a man during my research in college who's mother had convinced him he was French for fear of being discriminated against-- his grandfather had been refused treatment in a hospital for being Sioux and died of gangreen.  He was in his 20s when he found out he was Native American. Throughout Latin America you've got all the paintings of jesus and saints and whatnot as white.  There are people who refuse to allow their children to speak spanish, who use bleaching cream on their faces to erase their identity. No matter how inclusive your workplace is, the severe social ostracism of gay people is embedded in our society finds its way into every psyche. For people who identify as gay, and those who don't identify as gay but might like members of the same sex, how might they feel when every hero-narrative is anchored in a heterosexual romantic subplot?

So, while it can be really nice to have some sort of representation in art, there isn't much.  But, as a social scientist, I want to refute your numbers argument.  There is probably a lot more gayness than you realize.  Here's some possible reasons.

1. It's biologically present but socially erased.

In terms of the probability of having an LGBTQ character, consider Kinsey's research.  In terms of same-sex and opposite-sex attraction (even if it's not acted on) Kinsey found a normal distribution.



In purely biological terms 10% of people are straight, 10% are gay.  Everyone else is somewhere in between.  But most people on that curve don't *identify* as bisexual. Which probably has to do with straight people defining themselves as "not gay" and gay people defining themselves as "not straight", performing gender stereotypes with all their might to make sure that scary grey area doesn't exist. One study found that something like 74% of men who have had sex with men around the world identify as straight because they also have sex with women.

Anyway, when you said "trainer" I immediately thought of physical trainer (even though I'm sure you're a different kind of trainer) and that made me think of this brosciencelife video where he's doing curls and some guy looks over at him and he says "It's okay to look.  It's not bisexual, it's biceptual." Which was pretty hilarious.

2. Gayness and straightness changes throughout time, as it is a social construction:

The ancient incans left tons of statues of orgies: gay, straight, you name it. Almost no homosexuality was reported in the Trobriand islands until *after* missionaries came and insisted that platonic male on male intimacy (as in cuddling) was homosexual and therefore prohibited, then there was tons. In medieval Europe, the was tons of gayness among the aristocracy (some of its really juicy stuff, like when Cardinal Richelieu brokered a gay relationship with the king of france, then had the guy killed when he didn't do the Cardinal's bidding).  In pre-Islamic Indonesia, the shamans had gay apprentices.  Leonardo di Vinci was super gay.  Michealangelo was tortured over his sexuality.  Alexander the Great was either gay or bisexual.

3. Gayness can also change over a person's lifetime. 

In Greece (and much of the Islamic world) it was often considered common to bang your same-sex bff until you get married. Increasingly people are identifying as fluid.  It was previously talked about as a "phase" but increasingly people are arguing that tastes can change back and forth, and one isn't any more of a "phase" than the other.  Also attraction can have nothing to do with sexuality.  Maybe you're demisexual and attracted to people based upon a personality connection.  Maybe you've got a creepy blonde hair fetish and it doesn't matter if it's Fabio or Barbie.  Attraction is a lot more varied and transient than the simple categories society has made for us.

This image is pretty cool:
Spoiler for Hiden:


4. Its unprofessional to talk about your sex life, and who you bang is absolutely no one else's business.

Privacy is a right. It's rude to ask, and shouldn't have any bearing on how you relate with colleagues.

Anyway, I'm not saying whether any of this fits in your stories or whether it doesn't.  But it's there, and it's something we're all exposed to, but society does a serious number on our brains.

Anyway, sorry for the long post, but I felt the need to put my education in gender studies to use :)

7
Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: LGBT Fantasy?
« on: July 08, 2019, 11:51:06 PM »
Yes, exactly as ScarletBea said. I find that an awful lot, when writers say that character sexuality isn't important, what you find is that every single character is heterosexual - often only denoted by reference to a spouse, or a passing comment about what they find attractive, or some other throwaway element that is barely distinguishable from background noise. But it is distinguishable, especially when you're desperately looking for yourself in this universe and finding nothing.

There are so many ways to indicate that a character is not heterosexual other than including a romance subplot or having it be significant to the character's story in some other way. In fact, I remember reading a book where I could tell the main character was at least bisexual by the way he described another male character. It wasn't a sexualised description, the hero wasn't at all interested in this other guy, but the nature of details he noticed and the way he noticed them suggested strongly that he did find some guys attractive. (I stopped reading the book for other reasons before I found out whether his sexuality was important to the plot, though.)

And, of course, consider the ways in which sexuality matters in the world that you're writing. In our present day, age and society, people may not refer to casually to their same-gender significant-others or otherwise demonstrate their sexuality because they fear adverse reactions. I know gay friends of mine have been afraid to hold their partner's hand in public because it may lead to hostility or outright violence. But we're creating our own societies, so we get to decide how sexuality is viewed, and why.

However, if the society being written does view non-heterosexuality negatively, for whatever reason, then sexuality is possibly more important a trait for a character, and having a character who is "incidentally" gay is not doing full justice to the repercussions of that trait - in a similar way as having a pale, blond character in a desert world who never gets sunburnt is not doing full justice to the repercussions of that trait. There are some times when a sexuality sort of had to actively colour at least that character's story and other personality traits.

But in general, sexuality is just one more character trait. People can be blonde or dark (or redheaded). People can be tall or short (or somewhere in between). People can be male or female (or trans or intersex). People can be straight or gay (or bi or asexual). Having all one kind of person in a story is sort of odd. Having all one kind of person in most stories is definitely rather boring.

One thing I will note in closing, however: the original point was about centring queer characters in the narrative. Pushing queer characters to the expendable margins is cliche and counter-productive - cliche inasmuch as the gay-character-who-doesn't-survive is a whole trope by itself (warning: Television Tropes link) and counter-productive inasmuch as the point of this is argument is about showing that queer characters get to be the hero of a story too.

@cupiscent I really love this. It's a heartfelt argument for why we need more diversity in every genre. I almost wish you had written the FF article we're all talking about!!

That said, I don't feel like you're being fair with @Justan Henner and @Not Lu and I want to back them up for a moment.

I doubt selfishness and politics are the reasons that zebras are under-represented in SFF. It is much more likely that zebras aren't needed to tell the story the author wants to tell.

I don't like this argument and I have short patience with it. I have never written, nor off the top of my head can I say I have read, a story that needed straight characters to tell it, and yet, there they are, all over fiction.

You basically set this argument up in your post saying that wondering why there isn't LGBTQ representation is like wondering why there isn't rain, so I don't think its fair to dismiss it so surreptitiously. My immediate response was "hmmm, my WIP doesn't have rain...." it just didn't make it in.  It wasn't what I imagined at the time. That doesn't mean I don't care about diversity. I have one WIP about the African experience of colonialism, another WIP about a poor whitish person confronting class.  If you only read the second one does that mean I don't care about diversity?

I care about representation and want there to be more. Where the article (and this discussion) rubs me the wrong way is when we attack artists who happen not to have diversity in one of their works.  It's simply not going to be in the scope of every thing you write, and I think this strategy (which to be fair is everywhere) is completely pointing guns in the wrong direction and I think Justan is right to point out that it's alienating.

Here's the main point I'd like to make:
If we want to do advocacy on representation, the pressure point is the publisher not the artist. A writer isn't homophobic bc he/she wrote a story about some straight people-- it's not helpful to vilify Scott Lynch or Niel Gaiman bc one of their books had no man on man action. But if on the large scale a publisher has no LGBTQ representation then that's where your issue is.

Seriously. I face palmed when I read the numbers argument. There's 1000 people out there writing inclusive stuff, they just need a publisher to help them reach audiences.

That's not to say that authors can't do more, if the muse hits. You yourself made the case for how authors should write whatever they feel in their hearts, but look for ways to stretch themselves.  Unlike Leo's article, I found what you wrote to be really inspirational and a great case for branching out.

Obviously and of course, writers can and should do whatever they like.

But as a reader, I - and the article's author - get to say, "I want to read books with more xyz and I think more authors should actively think about why they're leaving it out." Especially when the books are for younger readers and xyz is something that a lot of those readers will be dealing with directly or indirectly. I mean, it's not just a case of queer teens reading books that include queer characters in main roles - it's queer teens knowing that their peers are reading books that include queer characters in main roles. The inclusion of xyz (queer characters, female character, characters of diverse ethnic origins, whatever) helps to normalise the idea of those traits. No child is born a bigot, but we all react strongly to something we've never encountered before, especially if everything about our lives has underlined that we are normal and people with other traits are not. And you can tell children that it's ok to be gay / female / brown-skinned until you're blue in the face, but it won't stick if what they're being shown is that people who are gay / female / brown-skinned aren't the hero of regular stories.

So yes, I agree, writers can do whatever they want with their stories. But I think they should include more diversity (of all types). And I think if they aren't comfortable doing that they should stretch themselves to become comfortable doing it. I think that stretching is just part of being a writer - of being someone who aspires to tell stories of humanity. If all a writer wants to do is tell stories about their own experience, then that's their prerogative, but I'm not really interested in reading them (especially when that experience is the one that has dominated media for the last hundred years and more) and - I gotta be honest - I'm going to think less of them as a writer for it.

Yes, writing is hard, and this makes it a little harder. But life is hard, and being consistently excluded from the central narrative makes it harder. I weigh other people's lives as slightly more important than my art.

That said, I would say if you're writing outside of your area, keep in mind that you can very very easily get things wrong.  Visibility, done wrong, is worse than no visibility at all. This generation seems to have forgotten that media isn't the end goal, it's a tool to humanize, or dehumanize, and it can just as easily be leveraged to remove rights as to grant them. Take your pick, plenty of visibility of the black community continues to be racist af. For my moral compass, what's right or wrong has to do with how discrimination is handled in a work way more so than having xyz character represented.

The right kind of representation is NOT easy, and especially with all the mental gymnastics our culture goes through to erase bisexuality and fluidity (and that goes for members of the LG(b)T(q) community as well) it can very easily go wrong. Take ice man in the comics. In the episode where he comes out (celebrated by gay men and predominantly female "allies") a psychic straight woman tells him he's gay even though he insists he's not and has been sleeping with woman  The bi community (there's a thing where straight women and gay men insist to bi men that they are gay, since bisexuals can't exist) was understandably furious but largely ignored. And don't get me started on the controversies over stereotypes in representation.

When you try something new, you need people to vet it through the right people, and vetting can also be tricky. Your white gay friend might be biphobic, racist and sexist. Sexuality in particular is a very complicated subject, and there are a lot of different controversies to fall into. Does your stereotypical gay representation erase fluidity and bisexuality?  Does it reduce their humanity to a cliche? Does it have some sort of subtext that rationalizes discrimination or violence?

Anyway here's what I'm saying: 1) All the ire surrounding better representation needs to be pointed at publishers, not artists and 2) encouraging writers to stretch themselves is a noble goal and far more effective than vilifying artists who might not deserve it (though some probably do deserve it) and 3) visibility as a virtue in itself is infuriatingly dangerously wrong; if you *do* stretch yourself please for the love of god realize that there is a big learning curve with this stuff, and the learning never ends

8
Okay here it is.  I feel like it is too long.  It has to be short and to the point for the recruiter, but comprehensive and eloquent if it makes it past the recruiter to the hiring committee. It still needs to be proofread too.

Gaaahhhhh it's so stressful!!!

Here's the job description: https://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/job-opening-executive-director

Spoiler for Hiden:

Dear Mr. Moran:

As an anthropologist and an indigenous rights activist, I have long admired the work of Cultural Survival and was very excited when Barbara Rose-Johnston suggested I apply for the position of Executive Director. I align perfectly with Cultural Survival’s core values, I have broad experience managing nonprofit and research programs on four continents, my expertise in visual anthropology will parlay well into overseeing CS Quarterly and indigenous media programs, and my collaborations with development directors and grant writers has offered me insight into a diverse range of funding streams and how to access them.

Very much in line with Cultural Survival’s mission, my work conducting research and overseeing programs in Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mali, Niger, and the US has been about strengthening the voices of people in the crosshairs of colonial development practices and identifying effective resistance strategies.  I’ve found both inspiration and guidance from indigenous communities I’ve worked with: Amazonian groups confronting mining interests, Saharan pastoralists confronting climate change, and Indonesian ethnic minorities facing violent political repression. A leadership role Cultural Survival would be an exciting chance to translate the political innovations of my indigenous mentors into global action, working together to confront the colonialism that has plagued us for centuries.

I write this letter from the Ecuadorian Amazon, where the pan-Amazonian confederations CONFENIAE and COICA have made great advances defending their territory, the key to indigenous livelihoods and continued existence as peoples. Their work includes the exciting things that Cultural Survival funds-- indigenous radio, alternative economies, and political advocacy in support of Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)—but also a “new realities” initiative: finding ways to enroll urbanized indigenous youth in the struggle, valorizing their skills as inter-cultural mediators and uniting their class struggle with the struggles of remote indigenous territories. Like COICA has done across the Amazon, Cultural Survival is well positioned to extend its reach as a network facilitating skill-sharing, solidarity, and the scaling-up of new indigenous rights strategies.

Converting grassroots knowledge and political will into actionable advocacy has been central to every role I’ve held.  At the California League of Conservation Voters (CLCV) I converted a simple get-out-the-vote program into an environmental justice lobbying and leadership development program. As a facilitator of the voices of those most affected by environmental injustice, I was asked to join the board of directors of their multi-million-dollar PAC, as well as several other PACs. Some of my work in Indonesia involved designing a program to teach young homeless musicians to engage in media advocacy. At BARA, I was focused on translating Bambara and Tuareg voices into advocacy videos used to promote changes in development agency practices. At the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) I brought the voices and insights of survivors into our outreach and training strategies, building their capacity to do their own outreach in the process. I was not only a spokesperson for CAST on Spanish radio and television, I trained survivors in media relations strategies.

My work has frequently involved facilitating remote partnerships and teamwork across great geographical and cultural divides to empower bottom-up social change.  My role directing media-advocacy programs for the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA), the British Red Cross, and Oxfam America involved negotiating between academic institutions, American and European NGOs, West African nonprofits, and on-the-ground beneficiaries.  I coordinated the simultaneous efforts of staff and volunteers in 4 countries.

In addition to community relations, I also bring organizational, administrative and fundraising expertise to the table. Having managed substantial government and foundation grants for my own research and nonprofit programs, I am adept at administration and interfacing with institutional funders. At CAST, I managed our training and outreach program’s budget, including re-granting to partner organizations. I was the point person for our interactions with funding agencies like the US Office of Trafficking in Persons and the UN Office of Drugs and Crime, including annual and quarterly reports.

Frequently based in Los Angeles, my network includes a wide range of development directors, donors, and foundations in an environment very willing to give to causes like Cultural Survival. In my previous roles coordinating, managing and designing programs as well as sitting on the Board of Directors of two political action committees (PACs), I spoke at meetings attended by prospective donors, networking events, workshops and media events, communicating the life experiences of the vulnerable to the wealthy, and establishing the importance of our programs. 

I have a broad range of experience as a boundary-spanner between communities, organizations, the media, governments and foundations. I would love to put that experience to work for Cultural Survival, growing the organization, and expanding its role in the global movement for indigenous rights.

Sincerely,


So given everyone's advice I'm playing with this:

Spoiler for Hiden:

Having long admired the work of Cultural Survival, I was very excited when Barbara Rose-Johnston suggested I apply for the position of Executive Director.

1) I align perfectly with Cultural Survival’s core values,
2) I have broad experience managing nonprofit and research programs on four continents,
3) my expertise in visual anthropology will parlay well into overseeing CS Quarterly and indigenous media programs, and
4) my collaborations with development directors and grant writers has offered me insight into a diverse range of funding streams and how to access them.

Core Values

I’ve found both inspiration and guidance from indigenous communities I’ve worked with: Amazonian groups confronting mining interests, Saharan pastoralists confronting climate change, and Indonesian ethnic minorities facing violent political repression. A leadership role Cultural Survival would be an exciting chance to translate the political innovations of my indigenous mentors into global action, working together to confront the colonialism that has plagued us for centuries.

I write this letter from the Ecuadorian Amazon, where the pan-Amazonian confederations CONFENIAE and COICA have made great advances defending their territory, the key to indigenous livelihoods and continued existence as peoples. Their work includes the exciting things that Cultural Survival funds-- indigenous radio, alternative economies, and political advocacy in support of Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)—but also a “new realities” initiative: finding ways to enroll urbanized indigenous youth in the struggle, valorizing their skills as inter-cultural mediators and uniting their class struggle with the struggles of remote indigenous territories. Like COICA has done across the Amazon, Cultural Survival is well positioned to extend its reach as a network facilitating skill-sharing, solidarity, and the scaling-up of new indigenous rights strategies.

Management and Media Expertise

Spoiler for Hiden:

I need to cut all of this down to 1 paragraph:

Quote
Converting grassroots knowledge and political will into actionable advocacy has been central to every role I’ve held.  At the California League of Conservation Voters (CLCV) I converted a simple get-out-the-vote program into an environmental justice lobbying and leadership development program. As a facilitator of the voices of those most affected by environmental injustice, I was asked to join the board of directors of their multi-million-dollar PAC, as well as several other PACs. Some of my work in Indonesia involved designing a program to teach young homeless musicians to engage in media advocacy. At BARA, I was focused on translating Bambara and Tuareg voices into advocacy videos used to promote changes in development agency practices. At the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) I brought the voices and insights of survivors into our outreach and training strategies, building their capacity to do their own outreach in the process. I was not only a spokesperson for CAST on Spanish radio and television, I trained survivors in media relations strategies.

My work has frequently involved facilitating remote partnerships and teamwork across great geographical and cultural divides to empower bottom-up social change.  My role directing media-advocacy programs for the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA), the British Red Cross, and Oxfam America involved negotiating between academic institutions, American and European NGOs, West African nonprofits, and on-the-ground beneficiaries.  I coordinated the simultaneous efforts of staff and volunteers in 4 countries.

In addition to community relations, I also bring organizational, administrative and fundraising expertise to the table. Having managed substantial government and foundation grants for my own research and nonprofit programs, I am adept at administration and interfacing with institutional funders. At CAST, I managed our training and outreach program’s budget, including re-granting to partner organizations. I was the point person for our interactions with funding agencies like the US Office of Trafficking in Persons and the UN Office of Drugs and Crime, including annual and quarterly reports.

Fundraising

Frequently based in Los Angeles, my network includes a wide range of development directors, donors, and foundations in an environment very willing to give to causes like Cultural Survival. In my previous roles coordinating, managing and designing programs as well as sitting on the Board of Directors of two political action committees (PACs), I spoke at meetings attended by prospective donors, networking events, workshops and media events, communicating the life experiences of the vulnerable to the wealthy, and establishing the importance of our programs. ]

I have a broad range of experience as a boundary-spanner between communities, organizations, the media, governments and foundations. I have a long history of both work and research focused on strengthening the voices of people in the crosshairs of colonial development practices and identifying effective resistance strategies. I would love to put that experience to work for Cultural Survival, growing the organization, and expanding its role in the global movement for indigenous rights.

Sincerely,


9
General Discussion / Re: Tattoos
« on: July 06, 2019, 06:12:18 AM »

I have 2.

One covers much of my right chest, wraps over my shoulder, and then winds down my tricep and around my bicep.  It's a dragon, it's head and upper claws coiled on my chest, wing over my shoulder and tail wrapping its way around my arm. It's done mostly in solid black with the negative space used for the spaces that would normally be darker.  The negative space has a sort of shifting color pallate of green and aqua. When I'm wearing a short sleeved shirt, only the tail peeks out on my bicep, and it's got an aqua color in the middle so everyone who sees it is like "Oh!  Is that a dolphin?" To which I sullenly reply "No.  It's a dragon." because 1) dragons are way more badass than dolphins and it's embarrassing that everyone thinks I have a dolphin all the time and 2) because dragons are considered pretty trite at this point, like some sort of bad 90s gangster tattoo, so its embarrassing to tell people I have a dragon. I got it because my roommate in college was an art major and he bought a tattoo gun on the internet and everyone else got really tiny tattoos and I was like f* that I want a huge one.  He designed it himself and it was mostly black and he had no idea what he was doing (it was like his 4th tattoo ever) so he didn't know what angle to hold the gun at and my whole chest and shoulder were like just one giant inky wound.  It took him 5 sessions, 20 hours total.

The other one is on the right back shoulder just below the wing of the dragon.  It took like 20 min.  I got it from another friend who owns a tattoo parlor.  I designed this one myself amalgamating things from the internet.  It's a painted/brushstroke style ouroboros encircling an awen, an ancient druidic symbol for the creative power of poetry and the rays of the sun, which may have possibly been entirely made up by a shady pseudohistorian in the 17th century.

I want to get a giant tattoo of a phoenix going up my left leg b/c I don't have anything on my left side and a phoenix is said to complement the dragon in eastern mythology (as yin and yang) and in western mythology the phoenix is the positive aspect of scorpios, and the whole death and rebirth thing is cool but I haven't gotten it yet maybe one day.

10

Who was the first person to welcome you to your new home?
Who was the first person to reply to your outside the intro section?
Who were the first three posters who replied to your first ever topic?

The first post I ever made in the introduction section was about 3-4 years after I joined and it was "Hi, I'm Brandon Darewoodson" because Eclipse had nicknamed me that in a post and Xiagan changed my name to Brandon Darewoodson without me noticing in like forever.  Scarlet was the first to reply.

So my first post ever on the forum was in the middle of a conversation, and it was pretty much ignored, my second post ever was starting my own topic that 2 people replied to.
...but I actually replied to myself first!
Then jefGoelz
Then RocknRollnWrite

My next post got ignored...

The next time someone replied to a topic I posted was over a year later, and that was
Dr. Chill

11
Okay here it is.  I feel like it is too long.  It has to be short and to the point for the recruiter, but comprehensive and eloquent if it makes it past the recruiter to the hiring committee. It still needs to be proofread too.

Gaaahhhhh it's so stressful!!!

Here's the job description: https://www.culturalsurvival.org/news/job-opening-executive-director

Spoiler for Hiden:

Dear Mr. Moran:

As an anthropologist and an indigenous rights activist, I have long admired the work of Cultural Survival and was very excited when Barbara Rose-Johnston suggested I apply for the position of Executive Director. I align perfectly with Cultural Survival’s core values, I have broad experience managing nonprofit and research programs on four continents, my expertise in visual anthropology will parlay well into overseeing CS Quarterly and indigenous media programs, and my collaborations with development directors and grant writers has offered me insight into a diverse range of funding streams and how to access them.

Very much in line with Cultural Survival’s mission, my work conducting research and overseeing programs in Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mali, Niger, and the US has been about strengthening the voices of people in the crosshairs of colonial development practices and identifying effective resistance strategies.  I’ve found both inspiration and guidance from indigenous communities I’ve worked with: Amazonian groups confronting mining interests, Saharan pastoralists confronting climate change, and Indonesian ethnic minorities facing violent political repression. A leadership role Cultural Survival would be an exciting chance to translate the political innovations of my indigenous mentors into global action, working together to confront the colonialism that has plagued us for centuries.

I write this letter from the Ecuadorian Amazon, where the pan-Amazonian confederations CONFENIAE and COICA have made great advances defending their territory, the key to indigenous livelihoods and continued existence as peoples. Their work includes the exciting things that Cultural Survival funds-- indigenous radio, alternative economies, and political advocacy in support of Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)—but also a “new realities” initiative: finding ways to enroll urbanized indigenous youth in the struggle, valorizing their skills as inter-cultural mediators and uniting their class struggle with the struggles of remote indigenous territories. Like COICA has done across the Amazon, Cultural Survival is well positioned to extend its reach as a network facilitating skill-sharing, solidarity, and the scaling-up of new indigenous rights strategies.

Converting grassroots knowledge and political will into actionable advocacy has been central to every role I’ve held.  At the California League of Conservation Voters (CLCV) I converted a simple get-out-the-vote program into an environmental justice lobbying and leadership development program. As a facilitator of the voices of those most affected by environmental injustice, I was asked to join the board of directors of their multi-million-dollar PAC, as well as several other PACs. Some of my work in Indonesia involved designing a program to teach young homeless musicians to engage in media advocacy. At BARA, I was focused on translating Bambara and Tuareg voices into advocacy videos used to promote changes in development agency practices. At the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST) I brought the voices and insights of survivors into our outreach and training strategies, building their capacity to do their own outreach in the process. I was not only a spokesperson for CAST on Spanish radio and television, I trained survivors in media relations strategies.

My work has frequently involved facilitating remote partnerships and teamwork across great geographical and cultural divides to empower bottom-up social change.  My role directing media-advocacy programs for the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA), the British Red Cross, and Oxfam America involved negotiating between academic institutions, American and European NGOs, West African nonprofits, and on-the-ground beneficiaries.  I coordinated the simultaneous efforts of staff and volunteers in 4 countries.

In addition to community relations, I also bring organizational, administrative and fundraising expertise to the table. Having managed substantial government and foundation grants for my own research and nonprofit programs, I am adept at administration and interfacing with institutional funders. At CAST, I managed our training and outreach program’s budget, including re-granting to partner organizations. I was the point person for our interactions with funding agencies like the US Office of Trafficking in Persons and the UN Office of Drugs and Crime, including annual and quarterly reports.

Frequently based in Los Angeles, my network includes a wide range of development directors, donors, and foundations in an environment very willing to give to causes like Cultural Survival. In my previous roles coordinating, managing and designing programs as well as sitting on the Board of Directors of two political action committees (PACs), I spoke at meetings attended by prospective donors, networking events, workshops and media events, communicating the life experiences of the vulnerable to the wealthy, and establishing the importance of our programs. 

I have a broad range of experience as a boundary-spanner between communities, organizations, the media, governments and foundations. I would love to put that experience to work for Cultural Survival, growing the organization, and expanding its role in the global movement for indigenous rights.

Sincerely,


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Same process for Firefox. Go to the extetions or add ons tab and search "ad blocker"

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General Discussion / Employment issues
« on: July 04, 2019, 10:19:15 AM »
ScarletBea's note: I've moved these posts from the "Depression etc" thread because I feel they address a different issue. Let's have a separate thread for employment advice (similar to the "Domestic issues" thread for stuff around the house).
I hope this is ok with the people involved?



I'm nervous about this job application for a job I really want, but that's definitely outta my league.  Can I post my cover letter here for editing advice?

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General Discussion / Re: Mom or Mum
« on: July 04, 2019, 10:14:48 AM »
We all know the correct answer don’t we?

Apparently not

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Short story contest for next month:

Crudeness

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