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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a cheeky Nandos.)
saw this.  totally thought of our lady ty.

http://www.tor.com/2016/09/21/obviously-you-need-gloves-that-make-you-look-like-a-dragon/

Saw it too. Got mildly annoyed because it directs to an etsy shop, and not to the knitting patterns.

I think those are the sexiest scales of them all :



Seen applied by someone here :



You can knit flat scaly impressions of all sorts like so :



http://www.ravelry.com/projects/anneleterme/brickstreet

Or the dragons themselves :





http://theraineysisters.com/?p=2454

Or soft impressions :



Or gauntlets :



http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/galadriel-battle-mitts

Or make a whole cowl of it :



http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/loop-teufelszwirn

Crochet a whole blanket :



https://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/truebluemeandyou-diys-for-creative-people-2735225/diy-crochet-dragon-blanket-from-mjs-off-hook-4724183991

Knit the dragons themselves :





http://tinyurl.com/hjndyek

http://blog.fuzzymitten.com/2013/06/wee-dragon.html



Game of thrones knits...  http://intheloopknitting.com/10-game-of-thrones-free-knitting-patterns/

September 22, 2016, 06:28:15 PM
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Re: [Sep 2016] - Pirates! - Discussion Thread
I mean, no one says Aye for yes outside of scottish people and pirate characters. So it's "affected" in that sense. It doesn't seem natural, and comes with a certain gruffness due to the type of tropey characters who use this casually. KnowwhatImean?


In the north of England and to some extent around the Midlands (but not as common), 'aye' is used fairly naturally to mean 'yes' 'sure' or 'okay.' I think as far south as Devon (farming lands) it's used in the more common sense of asking a question, the equivelent of the Americanised 'eh' but pronounced 'ay.' Pretty sure Welsh folk use it too, in both forms. Tbh, I'm just gonna go ahead and say it's a British term, but became synonyous with pirates due to popularity of West country accents in Carol's work.

I think the trope comes from everyone following the 'rule' that fantasy has to be in a medieval setting, but for myself it's just a natural part of language (though I'll admit I say it less that my characters, but I do say it often in real life). Hopefully that clears some things up for you?

Woosh... dialect and accent lesson over!

Yam Barmpot don't Bamboozle them ya blobmouth my old murker

September 24, 2016, 07:53:39 PM
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Re: [Sep 2016] - Pirates! - Discussion Thread Bin mon, your noggin yed is yampy  ;D
September 24, 2016, 11:04:26 PM
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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*

September 30, 2016, 05:11:20 PM
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Re: [Oct 2016] - Corpses - Discussion Thread

But my stories tend to have a blurred focus as opposed to a linear plot, so it often feels like it lacks direction. But I enjoy writing things with a heavy atmosphere, where things aren't really explained - you just kinda have to assume and let your mind run with the idea :)

I think I'm going to try something different for this month. Good luck everyone! Great to see we have a decent amount of submissions already!

You're probably just more advanced than us plotters!!! There's a fair amount of well-regarded plotless literary fiction, I think the slice-of-life format fits very well for shorts too!

October 15, 2016, 03:17:23 AM
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