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Messages - Dark Squiggle

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1
*Necromancy*
I find it amazing that Rowling doesn't even appear on this list.
Also, if we count Leguin and Pratchett, who are dead, we should also count Tolkien, E.A. Poe, Hans Christian Anderson,The Grimms, and maybe even Richard Wagner, W. Irving, Verne, and all the other dead authors who still sell well, influence current fantasy, and are probably better known outside of fantasy then even Brandon Sanderson.

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Will it be animated? If so, 2D or 3D?

3
Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: Abebooks top 50 Fantasy Book List
« on: September 14, 2018, 02:14:00 AM »
Definitely mostly British and old. The Golden Compass is even shown with its British Name, Northern Lights (Which I guess is fair, as its Author is British).
My tally:
Did Not Read 12
Never Heard Of 27
Read, Liked 9
Read, Did Not Like 2 (Seriously Graceling and American Gods? American Gods[i\] is far and away Gaiman's worst book, and Graceling has such consistency problems :( grrrr...

4
Many a time in urban fantasy. New York is popular. :)
Yeah, on the rare occasion that Urban Fantasy is set outside of London, it is usually set in NYC, so I do see it.

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Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: Most Evil Character in Fantasy
« on: July 08, 2018, 07:44:03 PM »
Capricorn, from Cornelia Funke's Inkheart.
He has an evil henchman, Basta who he lets run free, spitting pure love of being nastyat everyone, but once you meet the master... Ambitious, but willing to be extragavantly cruel for no reason, not so dumb as to become theatrical. Strikes only when he can hurt emotionally, phsically and monetarily and effect multiple people - otherwise it's not worth his bother. Comes from a rough fantasy world, read out of a book by someone with a superpower called a 'silvertongue' and then tries to killl all silvertongues and destroy all copies of his book for fun and to prevent a double of himself from being made. He kills the author who wrote him. He has that distinct attitude of 'because I can'. Holds court and forces characters tto hurt each other while he watches. He is so realistic, and so evil....

6
The Jean Valjean-Javert duo from Les Miserables.  Their lives both begin with a set path, but both are forced to admit their outlooks are wrong and change, and both choose to leave the world when it no longer needs them.They are nearly identical yet polar opposites. Their lives are just a little out of sync, and that makes all the difference.

7
General Discussion / Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« on: June 27, 2018, 04:53:47 AM »
Either like with their legs under them, like birds and dinosaurs, or by using their wings as legs, like vampire bats.

Like a T-Rex might be good—can't really see them hopping about as birds though.
More like an emu than a sparrow.

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General Discussion / Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« on: June 26, 2018, 03:12:59 PM »
As an artist, I hate 4 legged dragons. There simply isn't enough room on a body for big breast muscles to drive wings and the shoulders and chest muscles for forelegs. Every 4 legged dragon drawing or painting I've ever seen omits muscle and joints and/or hides them. It doesn't bother me much when the have wings that sprout from the back like an angel or bumblebee sized wings, as these are stylistic anyway. My .02, and slightly irrelevant, I know.

How can they move about on land with only two legs?
Either like with their legs under them, like birds and dinosaurs, or by using their wings as legs, like vampire bats.

I find that you can have dragons without actually having them. Intelligent spaceships, anthromorphized trucks, men of war, \any real central monster are all dragons.

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General Discussion / Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« on: June 25, 2018, 09:59:32 PM »
I like my dragons with four legs. Two legged dragons are overused. I know it's less aerodynamically feasible than the scaly bat model, but a dragon is too big to get off the ground anyway. If they can breathe fire, presumably that's a magical ability, so actually being able to fly should be as well and therefore four legs is fine. Or why not leave off the wings altogether? Wingless dragons are underused. Or legless dragons.

In all seriousness though, I'm not the biggest fan of dragons. I think they're a little overused, though not as much as zombies, and often too overpowered as well. But the dragons in the 'Silmirillion' are awesome. I love their origin story, I think they start off as fallen angels turned into giant snakes and Morgoth gradually upgrades them over time. And in spite of what I said earlier about them being overused, I think even the most overused tropes can still be awesome if done right.

My least favourite dragons I can remember are the dragons in 'The Wardstone Chronicles'. They're elemental spirits without bodies and they spend most of their time asleep. The only sign that they're even there is when you get an odd feeling. That's subversive, sure, but it's also really dull. That series has many strengths, but its dragons aren't one of them.
As an artist, I hate 4 legged dragons. There simply isn't enough room on a body for big breast muscles to drive wings and the shoulders and chest muscles for forelegs. Every 4 legged dragon drawing or painting I've ever seen omits muscle and joints and/or hides them. It doesn't bother me much when the have wings that sprout from the back like an angel or bumblebee sized wings, as these are stylistic anyway. My .02, and slightly irrelevant, I know.

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Small Press & Self-Published / Re: Fantasy Medieval-like manuscript
« on: May 30, 2018, 07:43:03 PM »
Wow.
It's beautiful. I love it.

11
General Discussion / Re: How many nationalities have we here
« on: May 13, 2018, 05:50:21 AM »

Quote
Britain counts as a separate nation from France and New York is counted with Texas, California, and the stuff in between?

You a thinking like an American. Everything doesn't compare (usually unfavorably) to how you do things. There is a tiny political elite who are desperate to make Europe into a single federalized state uniform and the similar wherever you travel within it. They are fighting against thousands of years of history, wildly different language, culture, cuisine and a lot of bloodshed.

Britain or better the UK is a separate nation from France despite or maybe because of a lot of shared history (often violent) because we are very different people with very different attitudes and lives to lead. Locality and geography have very little to do with it.
Yeah, but England and Wales have a bloody history and are mostly considered one nation, as are Bavaria and Prussia, yet both are considered part of the nations of Britain and Germany. New York and California  have different cuisine and culture. Even if you stay in Flatbush (a section of the New York City Borough of Brooklyn), the different neighborhoods have histories, languages, cuisines and cultures, some 100+ years old,
 and they're definitely not nations. Just because New York and New Jersey never fought a war with California doesn't make them less of a nation. We did have wars here in the US, too, mostly thanks to the Europeans, (Queen Anne's War, The French and Indian War, the Civil War.), in which the American states fought each other. Not being a sovereign state doesn't prevent you from being a nation, classic examples are Poland under Russia and Greece under Turkey. I understand how Britain and France are a little more separate then Texas and Rhode Island, but to me the difference between Britain and France is almost nonexistent, except that the French speak a language I can't understand. "Nation" is a pretty meaningless word, and glorifying Europe over the US is ridiculous.

12
Fun can be deep and meaningful. Terry Pratchett is proof of it. I think the reason people associate dark with meaningful is because dark stories (I'm thinking G. Orwell) make good cautionary tales, and because it is the only redeeming factor they have. A fun story doesn't have to be meaningful, or even very clever for people to love it, while a "dark" one does. Harry Potter is a perfect example of this.
I would pick fun over meaningful any day. I was given Zen and the art of Motorcycle Repair as a meaningful book that might help me in life, and it sent me into a months-long depression, part of which time I thought I was insane. Not worth it.

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General Discussion / Re: How many nationalities have we here
« on: May 10, 2018, 03:54:25 PM »
New Yorkers/Amsterdamners may be in a world of there own but don't count as an independent nation yet.
Britain counts as a separate nation from France and New York is counted with Texas, California, and the stuff in between?

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General Discussion / Re: How many nationalities have we here
« on: May 09, 2018, 08:16:23 PM »
New York.

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Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: History in Fantasy Books
« on: May 08, 2018, 05:38:55 PM »
Without the Norman conquest, would there have been a "Britannia Rules the Waves"?

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