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Messages - K.B. Adams

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Repeated history among family generations is very believable. How often do we hear of children of alcoholics growing up to marry alcoholics, or military families producing offspring who join the military when they grow up. Often, such children even swear they refuse to grow up to be like their parents, but they do anyway. I like your idea of the characters mocking how they are repeating history.

I do understand your concerns on the issue, and one that comes to my mind is that it's now "cool" to depict homosexual relationships and it can almost come across as taking advantage of a trend. Yet, humanity sincerely  seems to want to explore minority sexual orientation now, perhaps for a long time to come, so having it in the story might be a great reader draw. And if this trend peaks and settles back, hopefully homosexual relationships in story will have become mainstream and completely accepted, and therefore whatever direction you take these characters will be fine as long as your writers' heart is in to it. I do appreciate your concerns about avoiding hot-lesbian-on-hot-lesbian.

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Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: Religion in Fantasy
« on: May 18, 2017, 01:42:05 AM »
I'm not the least bit religious, but as long as a book isn't preaching about why I should have religion in my life, I don't have issues with. Religion is often in the center of conflicts and societies in history, it makes sense that it would feature heavily in epic fantasy. It is a very important component of how people function, what motivates them. As long as the author approaches religion in the same way as they should approach characters it should be fine. Avoid blatant stereo-types (or creating stereotypes within the fictional world), make it realistic, don't preach to the reader. Religion provides so many possibilities for conflict! Both personal and on a larger scale, there is so much room to build your world, your characters and the story.

I sure agree with this -- especially the warning not to preach to the reader, unless of course one is specifically writing for a certain religious genre (such as Enclave Publishing which publishes Christian fantasy and sci-fi) with a fan base that already wants and expects that. But it isn't just the major religions such as Christianity where authors can fall into the preaching trap. With some New Age paranormal and ascended master types of fiction, the authors would surely feel they are not preaching, just telling a good story. But in fact, it's blatantly obvious the authors feel their spiritual slant is superior, and the authors make sure their characters come to understand, in the end, just how superior that spiritual school of thought is.

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It could become overwhelming (if you're already a very tired writer  ;)) to bounce around from the various renaissance time frames and locations (Italian Renaissance... General European Renaissance...) to get enough information that gives your story a coherent sense of place. As someone else suggested, good idea to choose a one time and location, then start collecting data for that. Here's a link that describes the overall beginnings and where the Ren. spread over time, to help you choose. Once there, if you click the link "European Map" it shows how and when the Renaissance spread from Italy into Europe.

http://www.st.cr.k12.ia.us/Renaissance/geography.htm

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Sounds somewhat like an S-Corporation to me. Member numbers can be as low as one, so four is fine. Can be set up so voting is needed to make financial decisions. Except that S-Corps must only have members from the USA. So perhaps a C-Corporation which can have members from around the world. Though they can have unlimited members/shareholders, a limit of four might be fine if that's in their rules. They can further own or be owned by other entities, including financial trusts that might be funding them.

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Fantasy Resources / Re: Employment in a futuristic world
« on: May 09, 2017, 08:46:56 PM »
The Trends Institute says that because of innate human wiring, the more high tech a society gets, the more they crave "high touch" and hands-on to balance it.

Handcrafting and handmade are no longer a necessity in the future world, but they become a novelty experience others crave and now must pay for in order to experience. Teaching or allowing tours to handcrafting and experiences revolving around high touch now become new paid occupations.

Also, someone has to continue to build, repair, upgrade, and eliminate outdated drones, computers, etc.


"high touch" is why i think we're approaching a new artistic renaissance.  i'm actually pretty excited about it.

that being said, it's gonna be rough getting there:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/05/03/what-are-humans-good-for-bosses-worry-about-the-workforce-of-tomorrow
Quote
“Seriously? You’re asking about the workforce of the future?” added another respondent, a science editor who asked to stay anonymous. “As if there’s going to be one?”

m3mnoch -- I agree, getting from here to there could be very rough. I do see it sneaking in here and there, though. Several people in my group have worked with the agricultural industry since the 1980s. Used to be, farmers did their work, produced the crops, then got paid. Non-farmers couldn't have cared less about the farmers' farming business. Then industrialization made many of the smaller farms obsolete because huge machinery and more distant larger and larger plots of land now did the work that the smaller neighboring local farms once did by human labor.
Today, smaller farms are returning again, some even reverting back to horse power, most returning to gentler hands-on local production. And part of their income comes from agritourism, meaning they offer tours and hands-on workshops for people to come right onto their farm to see hands-on agriculture. (How to milk cows, how to make cheese at home, pick your own pumpkin, etc.) Pumpkin farms are making six-digit incomes by inviting people onto the farm -- which those people now crave because we no longer have the 40% agriculture society we used to have at the turn of the century (1800s/1900s) where farms were around every corner and taken for granted. Mainstream society now sees hands-on farming as a precious novelty they crave to experience. Higher tech continues to enter agriculture with computerized indoor growing operations -- yet the human soul still yearns to touch real soil.

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Fantasy Resources / Re: Employment in a futuristic world
« on: May 05, 2017, 10:07:44 PM »
The Trends Institute says that because of innate human wiring, the more high tech a society gets, the more they crave "high touch" and hands-on to balance it.

Handcrafting and handmade are no longer a necessity in the future world, but they become a novelty experience others crave and now must pay for in order to experience. Teaching or allowing tours to handcrafting and experiences revolving around high touch now become new paid occupations.

Also, someone has to continue to build, repair, upgrade, and eliminate outdated drones, computers, etc.

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Writers' Corner / Re: Do you start big or start small?
« on: May 03, 2017, 08:54:15 PM »
In a way, both -- starting small but with just a segment of the bigger world. The segment of the bigger world does have its set of life conditions and rules which are restrictive to the character but not restrictive to the story itself because they are what give conflict and challenge for the characters to negotiate through, rather than letting the world change on a whim to fit the character's latest desires or need to be heroic. But the segment of that world can then expand as the smaller details unwind.

On the other hand, Tolkien is known for saying he "started with a map, and made the story fit," and said about its reverse, “to compose a map from a story” is “weary work.”

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Self Publishing Discussion / Re: Good freelance editors?
« on: May 02, 2017, 09:56:43 PM »
Two we've had some experience with:

Sara Stamey at sarastamey.com is an award winning novelist (fantasy/sci-fi) who is also a university professor of "writing the novel" and has freelance edited for years. We met her at a writers' gathering years ago and have been following her work ever since. She also tries to help her clients find publishers and agents.

Or, if you want to write short story romance fiction for pay, one person in our group used Kate Willoughby's services for getting published in Woman's World Magazine. Not fantasy... needs to be contemporary USA "real" world. But if you write fantasy romance and also real world romance, it could be a place to break in with paid publication if you don't mind starting with real world. Her page is womansworldstyle.blogspot.com and she focuses only on that magazine, where she's also had many short story romances published.


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Writers' Corner / Re: Wearing costume while writing
« on: May 12, 2015, 08:23:55 PM »
Sort of a way to get a deeper felt sense of being the character, or being within the setting's time frame. I wouldn't have known this worked if I hadn't taken part in an historical re-enactment as an educational project that had nothing to do with fantasy writing. It was almost haunting, even the children involved were saying they didn't feel they were in the 21st Century anymore, they had time traveled.

I don't do this for my entire writing session, just now and then I get tangibly into character in some way, even for 15 minutes, and something in the mind shifts and gives me a thought wave to return to. To continue to just sit in the costume while in front of a laptop doesn't do the trick. Once I'm really into the writing itself in front of the keyboard, I don't notice the current surroundings or garb and need to be free from distraction and to be very comfortable.

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Writers' Corner / Re: Wearing costume while writing
« on: May 12, 2015, 05:37:59 PM »
"K" is the initial of my late husband's first name, he died of pancreatic cancer. "B" is the initial of my first name. We wrote the ebook "Build 100 Worlds" (fantasy fiction ideas) together before he died. So K.B. is my fantasy fiction name from now on.

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Writers' Corner / Wearing costume while writing
« on: March 26, 2015, 09:52:50 PM »
Does anyone else ever find it useful and/or fun to dress in costume similar to the main character you're currently writing on?

Doesn't work if you're a gal writing about a three-headed male dragon, or switching characters quickly. But a few times when I donned translucent wings, or another time I wore a pinafore over a calico dress, pantaloons and a bonnet, it helped me tap into other realms of thought.

The hard part is doing this as an adult and hoping no one will see you. If you continually worry about someone finding you out, it's harder not to have one foot in the current realm on guard while slipping off into fairyland or the 1890s. Even if other people "understand why you're doing it," I find their presence pulls me right out of my suspension of disbelief.

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Build 100 Worlds

Fantasy fiction writing ideas, inspirations and story starters
(From enchanted lands to lost alternate histories to
astounding future realms)


Here!









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Fantasy Book & Author Discussion / Re: 4-Word Reviews
« on: March 19, 2015, 06:11:19 PM »
The Postman (film)

Boys will be boys

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Beatrix Potter and her Peter Rabbit -- my first fantasy fiction author love from when I was a very young child about 10,000 years ago. I guess I've always sensed fantasy fiction as something powered by a strong female force. Though I, too, don't want to play "women as always the victim," this thread does point out that the playing field is unbalanced. Thanks for posting this.

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