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Re: Orbit, we need to talk... I don't know if we need a talk with Orbit but we need a talk with you about putting things in alphabetical order....
February 25, 2015, 04:59:13 PM
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Re: DNFs and Worst Books We Never Finished: WARNING - really stupid bad language Right, I finished this book, though it was in a haze of hatred and desperation, but it definitely deserves to be here and I know plenty who never did finish it and it is objectively awful.

This is my Ode to the Wheel of Time:

The Eye of the World was fantastic to me
And The Great Hunt too, made me read number three.
They got longer and longer but I didn’t care
I thought, ‘the slump in the middle, that’s only fair’.
In a series like this you have to invest,
With a story this big there’s a lot to digest
So while it slowed to a terrible slog
I kept going, hoping Jordan would clear up the fog.
Then Book 10 came along, the Crossroads of Twilight
And I slumped to my death in a river of dog shite.

February 05, 2016, 12:07:24 PM
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Re: This Census-Taker and Mieville Discussion Worth a lot as you are the only person posting who has read it.
February 08, 2016, 11:21:04 AM
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Re: Mainstream fantasy publishing ain't what it used to be A couple of things:

a book which proved to be the UK’s first new wave zombie book and which became the best-selling self-published title in the UK - Citation needed

True Blood by Charlaine Harris was rejected by every publisher in the western hemisphere for two years. She was close to giving up. Twilight became successful in 2008 and then there was an insane scramble to secure the rights to True Blood. - Dead Until Dark was published in 2001, and was repackaged for the release of the TV show. Harris has had books published and - generally - in print since the early 90s to the present day.

And what about Joss Whedon’s Firely? Seems sensible? Not really - Firefly was a tv show, not a book. It had low enough ratings that it was, sadly, cancelled.

What we need are innovative, risk-taking, marketing-savvy and IT-savvy companies. We need companies that respect their authors and invest in their authors in the longer-term. - If we shuffle your list 1,6,2,4,3,5 then it goes: take a punt on new talent, but invest in established authors; don't try and catch trends - be unique, but don't look for things that are too unique; commit to series, but don't commit too much to them.

I get that you're frustrated with publishing as an entity - of course there's going to be a disconnect between the financial needs of a company and the creative needs of an author - but this is just...a confusing rant. I don't know what you expected to happen as a result of it. The likelihood of fandom rising up to smash the looms of traditional publishing is really rather slim. Maybe a cup of tea and a nice biscuit is in order. 



March 30, 2016, 04:50:12 PM
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