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Re: What do you find most difficult about writing? I guess my biggest problem is that often things don't turn out as well as they do in my head, and I don't like writing when something like that happens.
February 27, 2016, 03:21:14 AM
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What do you find most difficult about writing? plot, characters, dialog - these are my faves.  they've always come easy for me.

the painful, suffering-filled bits?

1) writing interesting prose.  i struggle tremendously with the "he did this.  she did that.  he did this other thing.  she followed up with something else."  every sentence would start with a name or pronoun if i didn't constantly battle against it.

2) finding the time to write.  family, work, social activities.  goddamn timesinks, they are.

February 27, 2016, 06:26:10 PM
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Re: What do you find most difficult about writing? Trying to stop procrastinating and actually start writing
March 03, 2016, 03:40:03 PM
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Re: Writing in order Can't remember which author I heard discussed, but he would pretty much always write the ending first, and work backwards. A technique I've been curious about using to see how it would go.

Patrick Ness said he always knew the beginning and the end of his stories, so he had a direction to aim for and allows him to fill up the rest with whatever he likes.

I write chronologically but outline way in advance, that way I know where the next few bits of the story are going so I can plan forward while I'm writing and (hopefully) doesn't feel directionless.

I also tend to have a vague notion of where and how I want it to end, but nothing is concrete, apart from the thing I'm working on atm, which I have the scene very clearly in my mind as what should be the last page.

March 18, 2016, 10:45:37 AM
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Writing in order My problem with writing later scenes is that I find it a nearly unbearable chore to write the in between.
This is probably the case because I'm a discovery writer (gardener) and when I have a later scene or ending already fleshed out, I loose all interest and motivation to get my characters there.

March 18, 2016, 11:26:35 AM
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Re: Writing in order
My problem with writing later scenes is that I find it a nearly unbearable chore to write the in between.
This is probably the case because I'm a discovery writer (gardener) and when I have a later scene or ending already fleshed out, I loose all interest and motivation to get my characters there.

I feel much the same as it happens. If I over-outline or write later scenes then I lose all interest in actually writing it.
The character and tone will also have changed a lot by the time I work my way up to that later scene, then I'll just have to re-write it anyway (if it's even still viable).

March 18, 2016, 01:21:05 PM
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Re: Writing in order I had to do an outline on my current WIP because it is an overhaul of an earlier work that had many issues. After my outline, I have started to write the ending, so I have a point that I am now writing to. This seems to be helping me a great deal to fill in the earlier and middle sections as I can do a better job of weaving threads that come together instead of gods know where.


March 18, 2016, 05:21:16 PM
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Re: Writing in order I write in chronological order. If I'm stuck for a while at a point in the story I will write start the next chapter and then go back when the missing bit of the story comes to me.
March 19, 2016, 06:54:02 PM
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Re: What are you currently reading?
Just started Saint's Blood by  Sebastien de Castell, really good so far and always nice to read something a little light hearted every now and again.

I'm annoyed that this isn't available in the US until later this summer.   I'll probably do a VPN to get it from Amazon UK before then but I wish they  would come out at the same time.

April 12, 2016, 02:35:19 AM
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Re: Author recommendations
Love reading anything from these guys:
Brandon Sanderson
Joe Abercrombie
Scott Lynch

Sanderson:

Brent Weeks: His work is a lot like Sanderson's, but much grittier. Lots of action. Cool magic, especially in his Lightbringer series.

Brian McClellan: As mentioned above, he actually was a student of Sanderson's. His work is also grittier than Sanderson's, but it features the same focus on interesting magic systems and lots of action.

Jim Butcher's Codex Alera: This is one of my favorite series. Full of magic and action and epic stakes. Like Sanderson, Butcher tends to focus on heroic characters.


Abercrombie

Luke Scull: The Grim Company feels a lot like Abercrombie's work in terms of grittiness and the characters, but I actually liked it better because there's more emphasis on magic like you'd get with Sanderson.

Scott Lynch

Rachel Aaron's Eli Monpress series. This is another thief fantasy that I actually liked even better than Lynch's work. It's a little more over the top and just plain fun. There's also quite a bit more magic.

Douglas Hulick's Among Thieves. A different take on the thief fantasy. Lots of action and a more down-to-earth kind of thief.

May 08, 2016, 11:32:40 PM
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