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Re: The Future of Fantasy Fantasy is treated like video games by the mainstream press in that it has a massive following, (fantasy books often hit the top of the NYT or the Sunday Times best sellers list)- but because the sort of person that works for the BBC or writes for a newspaper doesn't understand them, there is next to no mainstream coverage.

Hopefully HBO spunking a small fortune on Game of Thrones will help address this. After all we've had sci fi on the telly for decades now. In fact I think it's one of the few things that Stephen Fry has said in recent times that makes sense: he said the BBC treat sci fi and fantasy as childrens programmes and that Dr Who and Merlin are good but only in the context of being for kids.

February 23, 2011, 01:48:31 PM
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Re: Fantasy Novels - are they based on True World Events?
Joe Abercrombie. The Union is clearly The United States under Bush. an idiot in charge who has some faked battle ground experience, controlled by shady forces with a sinister advisor who is the real power behind the throne. Disastrous involvements in conflicts in other countries.incompetent military. Need I go on?   

I think the Union could equally as easily be modelled on Regency period Britain. An incapable leader succeeded by an incompetent one (Union=Britain), a powerful enemy just across the water (France&/orSpain=Ghurkul), a potential ally/rival riven by its own internal conflicts (Styria=Netherlands) and a formerly little more than lawless northern neighbour becoming a genuine threat (Reivers into Jacobite Scots=Raiders into Bethod's Northern Kingdom). You've even got a wide open and exapansive relatively unexplored expanse of land to the west (North America), not to mention the presence of the old and formerly powerful Empire now little more than bickering city states with no real impact on the wider world stage any more (The various city states, duchies and principalities which will become modern Italy).

April 13, 2011, 02:54:36 PM
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Re: Fantasy Novels - are they based on True World Events?
Joe Abercrombie. The Union is clearly The United States under Bush. an idiot in charge who has some faked battle ground experience, controlled by shady forces with a sinister advisor who is the real power behind the throne. Disastrous involvements in conflicts in other countries.incompetent military. Need I go on?   

I think the Union could equally as easily be modelled on Regency period Britain. An incapable leader succeeded by an incompetent one (Union=Britain), a powerful enemy just across the water (France&/orSpain=Ghurkul), a potential ally/rival riven by its own internal conflicts (Styria=Netherlands) and a formerly little more than lawless northern neighbour becoming a genuine threat (Reivers into Jacobite Scots=Raiders into Bethod's Northern Kingdom). You've even got a wide open and exapansive relatively unexplored expanse of land to the west (North America), not to mention the presence of the old and formerly powerful Empire now little more than bickering city states with no real impact on the wider world stage any more (The various city states, duchies and principalities which will become modern Italy).

Damn I hate it when someone blows my post out of the water with a way more intelligent post.  Damn you Funky Scarecrow ;)

April 14, 2011, 07:51:10 AM
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Re: Are taverns overused? I think you first have to think of purpose.  Social? Motel? Drinking?  Churches/Temples could take lodgers of their same faith, and provide a social setting.  Same with Guild houses.  A low-cost hostel would make sense where there is a lot of poor travelers (I don't think peasants did a lot, but you could have migrant workers or something).  A society could have developed where people liked to have visitors in their house, and might have "room to rent" signs along the road.  Boarding houses make sense.  But for drinking, whether you call it a pub, tavern, bar, house of ill repute, or whatever, they are the same all over.
September 15, 2012, 01:43:18 AM
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Re: Are taverns overused?
I think you first have to think of purpose.  Social? Motel? Drinking?  Churches/Temples could take lodgers of their same faith, and provide a social setting.  Same with Guild houses.  A low-cost hostel would make sense where there is a lot of poor travelers (I don't think peasants did a lot, but you could have migrant workers or something).  A society could have developed where people liked to have visitors in their house, and might have "room to rent" signs along the road.  Boarding houses make sense.  But for drinking, whether you call it a pub, tavern, bar, house of ill repute, or whatever, they are the same all over.

Mediaeval monasteries certainly used to take in travellers - in fact, a lot of inns were originally monastic houses of hospitality.  For peasants, it would depend how far the journey was to the nearest market or fair.  It might well be far enough that it made more sense to stay overnight in the town than to go home in the dark.  And, of course, you can make that work however you like in your own world.

September 15, 2012, 02:57:58 PM
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Re: Things that annoy you in fantasy novels Could you imagine it?  Harry and Ron buying a pack of Bertie Bots magical condoms from George and Fred?  Every imaginable flavour!  Every imaginable size!  Every imaginable type!  Except Fred and Ron as a cruel prank sell Ron a pack that reek of onions and play Barry White loudly.
May 19, 2013, 07:42:13 PM
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Re: Things that annoy you in fantasy novels
Could you imagine it?  Harry and Ron buying a pack of Bertie Bots magical condoms from George and Fred?  Every imaginable flavour!  Every imaginable size!  Every imaginable type!  Except Fred and Ron as a cruel prank sell Ron a pack that reek of onions and play Barry White loudly.
Or maybe steam would come out with a train whistle. .... gee. The possibilities are endless.

You watch it Arry, or I will have to Citizen Mod Voice you :P

May 19, 2013, 07:52:50 PM
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Re: Romance/Relationship in Fantasy
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Is the hero really the hero if he doesn't get the girl? I think not.

What if the girl wants someone else? Sorry, that's a silly means of measuring heroic-ness without context. :P A hero can still be a hero and not get the girl. Or boy. Or whatever.

Exactly. If there's a love interest, I really don't think they (frequently 'she', because being an object to be fought over seems to be par the course for female characters here, and NATURALLY the hero of the piece is a guy) should be "got". They get together, or have a relationship, which is very different.

Back at the original question....hmm, at the moment, I'm just all for healthy, perfectly consensual relationships with no abuse or rape-y overtones. Not here for "twisted" or "dark". I also don't mind the level of romance - sometimes, I just want to read a romance. Sometimes I want to read something that has only background pairings. It just depends on the mood.

(If anyone has any recs of books that have healthy, equal relationships in them, I'd be glad to have them.)

December 18, 2013, 10:10:02 PM
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Re: Romance/Relationship in Fantasy
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Back at the original question....hmm, at the moment, I'm just all for healthy, perfectly consensual relationships with no abuse or rape-y overtones.

THIS. ALL OF IT.

So you really do want your fantasy to be fantasy and to divorce all associations with reality, huh?

(Sorry, couldn't resist.)

Would you care to rephrase that so I actually understand what you are saying? Because I'm reading one thing, and I'm sure you didn't mean it.

I don't think he means what I thinks he means- That it should have aspects of realism and that abandoning romantic elements is unrealistic, or that an appreciation of the genre, devoid of that element,  is just an escape from reality?

If that's the case. I disagree. Romance is that extra ingredient, that is not loved by everyone, but loved my most people. You may even love it, but just need to take a break from it for a while(Like the extra cheese on the whopper =3), because of the effects it has on the plot and characterization of a novel.

'Fantasy is hardly an escape from reality. It's a way of understanding it.'

Figured I would jump on the bandwagon and share what I think Dan D Jones meant.

I thought is was a joke ... that the statement

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healthy, perfectly consensual relationships

is a fantasy aspiration in the real world. I don't think he meant it literally as in they are not possible (obviously they are), but more that bad and unhealthy relationships absolutely exist in real life and to create a world without that would take the makings of a fantasy world. I think it was just a joke that to expect all relationships to meet some ideal escapes from the realm of realism.

But ..... I don't know for sure. Dan will have to speak for himself.

The way I have read this conversation, Fellshot wants more healthy examples of relationships within novels to provide positive examples, and Dan made a joke that that only exists in a fantasy world.

Don't take my opinion as anything more than my interpretation. They will both have to clarify and speak for themselves. :)

December 19, 2013, 09:04:29 PM
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Re: Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens
December 02, 2014, 09:58:30 PM
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