November 24, 2020, 09:47:42 AM

Author Topic: Your top 3 Classics  (Read 18530 times)

Offline MarcoM

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2015, 08:00:27 AM »
1984 by George Orwell. It's just so... good. And terrifying. And enchanting.
Neuromancer by William Gibson. I'm a sucker for Cyberpunk and reading this one really gave me a new and wider perspective not only on the genre but also on how people perceived the future in the past.
The King of Torts by John Grisham. Not because the story was so great, but because it made a part of our society I had nothing to do with very accessible and understandable for me.

Offline Nora

  • Dropped in from another planet avec son sourire provocateur - et Hades and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4758
  • Total likes: 3617
  • Gender: Female
  • The Explorer
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2015, 09:05:36 AM »
As I define classics, I'd say :

1 - Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
2 - Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka
3 - Memoirs from Beyond the Grave - Francois-Rene de Chateaubriand (though I'd say Jane Eyre by Bronte is equal in 3rd place)

This last one is a serious serie of monstrous books, all written as memoirs by Chateaubriand as he went though the French Revolution, the imperial times, traveled in North America, met Napoleon, ect.
The man is the precursor of romanticism in literature. One of the first to be so strongly and poetically turned toward the Self. Brilliant work really and he was quite the arrogant genius, but it's definitely not for everyone.
"She will need coffee soon, or molecular degeneration will set in. Her French phrasing will take over even more strongly, and soon she will dissolve into a puddle of alienation and Kierkegaardian despair."  ~ Jmack

Wishy washy lyricism and maudlin unrequited love are my specialty - so said Lady_Ty

Offline Conan

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2015, 03:28:34 AM »
Moby Dick
Heart of Darkness
Richard II
Tied up and twisted; gnarled and knotted with wrinkles; haggardly firm and unyielding; his eyes glowing like coals, that still glow in the ashes of ruin; untottering Ahab stood forth in the clearness of the morn; lifting his splintered helmet of a brow to the fair girl's forehead of heaven.

Offline DMHamilton

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2015, 09:20:46 AM »
1. The Three Musketeers
2. Scaramouche
3. The Count of Monte Cristo

It's only just occurred to me that they are all set in France... Perhaps I need to broaden my horizons!

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3543
  • Total likes: 3026
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2015, 10:02:08 AM »
1. Hamlet - Shakespeare
2. Bleak House - Dickens
3. Middlemarch - George Eliot
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Big Wee Hag
  • ******
  • Posts: 7213
  • Total likes: 4908
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2015, 11:16:00 AM »
1. Hamlet - Shakespeare
2. Bleak House - Dickens
3. Middlemarch - George Eliot
Yay, Bleak House!
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3543
  • Total likes: 3026
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2015, 02:23:37 PM »
@Jmack glad you like Bleak House as well, but  hard to choose only three.  Had to apply only three books on a desert island rule. :) I love most of Dickens and Shakespeare, but I was very lucky as I had a brilliant teacher at school who showed us how to enjoy both. I am always so sorry when people say they hated them so much at school, never read anymore.
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Big Wee Hag
  • ******
  • Posts: 7213
  • Total likes: 4908
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2015, 02:37:40 PM »
@Jmack glad you like Bleak House as well, but  hard to choose only three.  Had to apply only three books on a desert island rule. :) I love most of Dickens and Shakespeare, but I was very lucky as I had a brilliant teacher at school who showed us how to enjoy both. I am always so sorry when people say they hated them so much at school, never read anymore.
I had a terrible bore of a teacher who taught Julius Caesar. Even though I was primed for Shakespeare from birth, I hated it and have never read it or seen it. Then Mrs. Addy gave us As You Like It the next year, and I was hooked.

An equally boring teacher taught A Tale of Two Cities. He made us write detailed chapter summaries for every chapter, and somehow I still loved it.

This teacher was so hated, a senior class hired a sophomore to throw a cream pie in his face one day during the seniors' class with him. He could have won the day by commenting on how good it tasted, but that wasn't in him. The sophomore bragged and was arrested for assault. The senior's squealed on each other and weren't allowed to get their diplomas from the stage.

But I came away loving Dickens.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline Skip

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2015, 08:17:16 AM »
1. War and Peace, hands down
2. Heart of Darkness, though pretty much anything by Conrad
3. The Big Sleep, though again, pretty much anything by Chandler

But, seriously, only three? One thing I do notice, though. For my lists, anyway, I have to go pretty far down before I get to any fantasy.

Visit Altearth

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3543
  • Total likes: 3026
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2015, 09:23:46 AM »
I had a terrible bore of a teacher who taught Julius Caesar. Even though I was primed for Shakespeare from birth, I hated it and have never read it or seen it. Then Mrs. Addy gave us As You Like It the next year, and I was hooked.

An equally boring teacher taught A Tale of Two Cities. He made us write detailed chapter summaries for every chapter, and somehow I still loved it.

This teacher was so hated, a senior class hired a sophomore to throw a cream pie in his face one day during the seniors' class with him. He could have won the day by commenting on how good it tasted, but that wasn't in him. The sophomore bragged and was arrested for assault. The senior's squealed on each other and weren't allowed to get their diplomas from the stage.

But I came away loving Dickens.
I've heard similar tales about teachers killing off Shakespeare so often and am very glad you survived. Liked the cream pie bit, but shame it went slightly askew. Have you seen the 1996 film of Romeo and Juliet by Baz Luhrman, semi modernised and filmed around Miami? I suspect you may enjoy it .Here's a taste:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjxHdNxvySU
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline Timstar

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2015, 08:59:41 AM »
Took me ten years of hating Shakespeare with a passion after school to finally give it another go. Love it now, bought the complete works and try to get to a play whenever I can.

Offline Alex

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #26 on: February 13, 2019, 11:41:25 AM »
Hard choice.

Top 3 in no particular order:

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Offline J.R. Darewood

  • aka Duckly Breadgood
  • Writing Group
  • Khaleesi
  • *
  • Posts: 2618
  • Total likes: 1571
  • Gender: Male
  • Zork. And it was all downhill from there.
    • Nerd Empire
Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2019, 07:58:27 PM »
Hmmm now I'm wondering what counts as a classic and what doesn't. Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell would top my list of nonfiction counts I have to think about the other too but probably something by Twain for sure

Offline isos81

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2019, 01:18:58 PM »
My top 3 classics are:
  • The Miserables by Victor Hugo
  • Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevski
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Kallor shrugged. 'I've walked this land when the T'lan Imass were but children. I've commanded armies a hundred thousand strong. I've spread the fire of my wrath across entire continents, and sat alone upon tall thrones. Do you grasp the meaning of this?'

'Yes' said Caladan Brood. 'You never learn'

Offline Bender

Re: Your top 3 Classics
« Reply #29 on: July 03, 2019, 02:53:24 PM »
Top off my head. Really can't drop any of them as they all had unique influences on my reading pattern.

1. Twenty Thousand Leagues under the sea - Jules Verne
2. The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas
3. The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
4. Treasure Island - RL Stevenson
5. The Scarlet Pimpernel - Baroness Orczy

"I shall hunt your firstborn children and laugh with glee as I tell them of your death in terrible detail, with many unpleasant adjectives!" - M-Bot

"Who needs science when you have a dragon?" - Neil DeGrasse Tyson in Sharknado 6