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Author Topic: Shakespeare  (Read 23272 times)

Offline Fallen One

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2012, 01:44:05 AM »
I saw a version of MacBeth done by Bell Shakespeare early this year and while Lady MacBeth was awesome the guy playing MacBeth had a really weird interpretation of the character, he seemed to have him confused with Richard III. Anyone ever seen the Rowan Atkinson sketch where he does pretty much every play Shakespeare ever wrote in about 5 minutes, with just narration from one guy? Brilliant stuff.

 This one?

 Rowan Atkinson & Hugh Laurie - Shakespeare and Hamlet (1989)


   
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Offline Elfy

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2012, 02:00:05 AM »
No, it's a different one. One guy narrates, and Atkinson sits off to the side making faces and playing multiple characters.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Fallen One

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2012, 03:13:13 AM »

 This one? But it seems to be more general, not specifically shakespearean:

 Rowan Atkinson: Pink Tights and Plenty of Props
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Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2012, 07:38:07 AM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.

No Fallen One, no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Redemption is offered in one of the most moving and beautiful speeches in the history of theatre.


Shylock:
I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same
food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases,
heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter
and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If
you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die?
And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the
rest, we will resemble you in that.
The Merchant Of Venice Act 3, scene 1, 58–68

And Shakespeare plots are sometimes contrived and cliched because that's the tropes he was playing with ... the question is what does Shakespeare want us to take from these tropes, and is he necessarily agreeing with them?  Are Romeo and Juliet really in Shakespare's view the world's greatest lovers?

I've actually heard that before, the scene I mean. I wonder if someone said that to Hitler. xD Jk. No offense to anyone with some bad memories of those times.

Also, I've written a report on all of the Sherlock Holmes' stories. You know, after finishing up the obvious classics, it's incredibly hard to find any good ones.

Which is ironic considering all classics are meant to be good if they've been immortalized as timeless classics. :P

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Offline Nighteyes

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2012, 07:49:58 AM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.

No Fallen One, no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Redemption is offered in one of the most moving and beautiful speeches in the history of theatre.


Shylock:
I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same
food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases,
heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter
and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If
you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die?
And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the
rest, we will resemble you in that.
The Merchant Of Venice Act 3, scene 1, 58–68

And Shakespeare plots are sometimes contrived and cliched because that's the tropes he was playing with ... the question is what does Shakespeare want us to take from these tropes, and is he necessarily agreeing with them?  Are Romeo and Juliet really in Shakespare's view the world's greatest lovers?

I've actually heard that before, the scene I mean. I wonder if someone said that to Hitler. xD Jk. No offense to anyone with some bad memories of those times.

Also, I've written a report on all of the Sherlock Holmes' stories. You know, after finishing up the obvious classics, it's incredibly hard to find any good ones.

Which is ironic considering all classics are meant to be good if they've been immortalized as timeless classics. :P



Its hard to find a good Sherlock Holmes story? And people say home schooling doesn'
t work. I give up. What next? Chaucer was an untalented hack?
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Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #35 on: October 16, 2012, 08:02:06 AM »
Lmao. No. I meant I considered Sherlock Holmes one of the great classics, and after reading it, there really isn't much to go around.

"Gulliver's Travels?"

"Yup. Read the book, wrote a report, saw the movie, wrote a review."

"Black Beauty?"

"Been there. Done that."

"Robinson Crusoe?"

"I liked Cast Away with Tom Hanks more."

"Abraham Lincoln's biography?"

"Yup."

"Steve Jobs' biography?"

"Of course."

"Well, OKAY THEN!"

My conversation with anyone I ask if they can recommend me some nice classics.
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Offline Idlewilder

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2012, 08:44:23 AM »
"Robinson Crusoe?"

"I liked Cast Away with Tom Hanks more."

Wow.


"Steve Jobs' biography?"

"Of course."


Is this a classic now? Double Wow.
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Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2012, 08:51:33 AM »
"Robinson Crusoe?"

"I liked Cast Away with Tom Hanks more."

Wow.  To be fair, I'd read Robinson Crusoe at a time when I hated reading, so my opinion was incredibly biased. xD


"Steve Jobs' biography?"

"Of course."


Is this a classic now? Double Wow.

To be honest with you? My dad loves it, so it may as well be a classic in my household. He's a die hard fan of Mac, and I got him a hardback edition of the biography at a discount as a gift. Of course, we can't write book reports on modern biographies, since they have to approve of it as a classic first. Unfortunately, that rules out everything fantasy and modernized, so I always have to scavenge at the darkest corners of the bookstores for some good classics. And people wonder why I only like fantasy. ;D

I actually once tried to pass off a fantasy book as something that isn't occult. It was the Chronicles of Narnia. Considering the first book was a Christian allegory, and my school pretty much gives you a medal for reading anything Christian-related, I thought it would've worked. Unfortunately, it did not. I think I had to do one of the Bronte sisters at the last minute. Err... Jane Eyre, or something like that.
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Offline Ur-Quan

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2012, 10:30:58 AM »
Try Orwell, it'll make those oppressive pricks feel self-aware.

1984. is an awesome read and quite deep.

Animal Farm is something better fit for your age category (no insult meant), but deep enough to be worth a fair bit.


Well, Orwell was writing in 20th century, so I'm not sure if he's a classic, but you did mention Jobs...  :P

Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #39 on: October 16, 2012, 10:44:01 AM »
Try Orwell, it'll make those oppressive pricks feel self-aware.

1984. is an awesome read and quite deep.

Animal Farm is something better fit for your age category (no insult meant), but deep enough to be worth a fair bit.


Well, Orwell was writing in 20th century, so I'm not sure if he's a classic, but you did mention Jobs...  :P

Touche.  ;D

Oh, and none taken. I'm mature for my age, but I'm not really out to tackle books that even adults say might be difficult to understand; I'm more or less in it just to have a good read, you know? xD

Anyways, I'll check out Animal Farm. My sister has the book somewhere in storage, I believe. Thanks for the recommendation, Quan.
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Offline Fallen One

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2012, 01:08:04 PM »

 Lord of the Rings, perhaps?

 And, now that we're at it, what is it that you mean by "a classic", exactly?

   I'm a bit lost, must it be english/ british? Otherwise, the Illiad might be a good idea or, if you wish to be a lot more cryptic, tackle exotioc classics, like the Journey to the West or the Romance of the Three Kingdoms. If you wanna go evenmore exotic, why not the tale of Gilgamesh?
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Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2012, 01:13:04 PM »

 Lord of the Rings, perhaps?

 And, now that we're at it, what is it that you mean by "a classic", exactly?

   I'm a bit lost, must it be english/ british? Otherwise, the Illiad might be a good idea or, if you wish to be a lot more cryptic, tackle exotioc classics, like the Journey to the West or the Romance of the Three Kingdoms. If you wanna go evenmore exotic, why not the tale of Gilgamesh?

Like I said, nothing occult.  :P

All of those appear to be occult. xD

It's what I hate about book reports; I can't even do a report on a book from my favorite genre! The madness!
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Offline Idlewilder

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #42 on: October 16, 2012, 01:17:11 PM »

 Lord of the Rings, perhaps?

 And, now that we're at it, what is it that you mean by "a classic", exactly?

   I'm a bit lost, must it be english/ british? Otherwise, the Illiad might be a good idea or, if you wish to be a lot more cryptic, tackle exotioc classics, like the Journey to the West or the Romance of the Three Kingdoms. If you wanna go evenmore exotic, why not the tale of Gilgamesh?

Like I said, nothing occult.  :P

All of those appear to be occult. xD

It's what I hate about book reports; I can't even do a report on a book from my favorite genre! The madness!

What on earth makes it occult?

But you should be able to do the Iliad.
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Offline Fallen One

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #43 on: October 16, 2012, 01:20:36 PM »

  Or, if you really want to bother your teachers, the Genji Monogatari :D
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Offline Jian

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Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #44 on: October 16, 2012, 01:21:04 PM »

 Lord of the Rings, perhaps?

 And, now that we're at it, what is it that you mean by "a classic", exactly?

   I'm a bit lost, must it be english/ british? Otherwise, the Illiad might be a good idea or, if you wish to be a lot more cryptic, tackle exotioc classics, like the Journey to the West or the Romance of the Three Kingdoms. If you wanna go evenmore exotic, why not the tale of Gilgamesh?

Like I said, nothing occult.  :P

All of those appear to be occult. xD

It's what I hate about book reports; I can't even do a report on a book from my favorite genre! The madness!

What on earth makes it occult?

But you should be able to do the Iliad.

It's a really strict Christian school, actually, and I got a scolding when I tried the Odyssey one time. :P

It's really quite annoying since I only read fantasy books most times, and I have to spend weeks searching for a good non-fantasy book. The Illiad would be a no-no because of the appearance of the Greek Gods and all.

What's the Genji Monogatari?
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