April 11, 2021, 02:00:14 AM

Author Topic: Shakespeare  (Read 23271 times)

Offline Fallen One

  • Chrestomanci
  • *
  • Posts: 711
  • At long last I crafted a decent profile!
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2012, 01:06:09 PM »


But for a first Shakespeare (and the one which will have the most impact on a school project of any sort at this level) it would have to be Macbeth.

 Sorry, I had to do it:

 Don't mention Macbeth - Blackadder - BBC
Director and editor of Nerd Alert Magazine:
 https://www.facebook.com/NerdAlertMagazine

Offline Idlewilder

  • Scottish Friction
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3479
  • Gender: Male
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2012, 01:12:54 PM »
Hahaha superb!

<-----------------------------And look - it's me!  :D
Make Another World.

Offline Jian

  • Kingkiller
  • ****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Gender: Male
  • Can't think of anything clever for this...
    • Writer's Periodical
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2012, 01:22:13 PM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD
Oh, I have a blog. http://dullboredom.wordpress.com/

Check it out, if you've got the time. Much appreciated.

Writer. Read my free, serialized story Radio Silence and vote to keep it free and serialized!

Offline Lor

  • Pictish Wonder
  • Master Namer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2474
  • Gender: Male
  • Queen of the Pirates
    • The Marketplace of Opinions
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2012, 01:30:08 PM »
Hahaha superb!

<-----------------------------And look - it's me!  :D

Edmund! ;)

I have had to look away and cross myself every time I've read the name of the Scottish Play, you people know not what you do! :P
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye." - Miss Piggy

Offline Fallen One

  • Chrestomanci
  • *
  • Posts: 711
  • At long last I crafted a decent profile!
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2012, 01:42:45 PM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.
Director and editor of Nerd Alert Magazine:
 https://www.facebook.com/NerdAlertMagazine

Offline Jian

  • Kingkiller
  • ****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Gender: Male
  • Can't think of anything clever for this...
    • Writer's Periodical
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2012, 01:47:56 PM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.

Oh, they had us read a couple of scenes of the Merchant of Venice for class. Of course, it was adapted so it read like a book and not a play and the words were simplified (I wish I was kidding when I said my classmates suck at reading), and it was dreadfully boring. I hear it's his weakest work, though, so that's probably it.
Oh, I have a blog. http://dullboredom.wordpress.com/

Check it out, if you've got the time. Much appreciated.

Writer. Read my free, serialized story Radio Silence and vote to keep it free and serialized!

Offline Idlewilder

  • Scottish Friction
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3479
  • Gender: Male
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2012, 01:59:40 PM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.

Yeh, I'm not a fan of Merchant of Venice either.

But I disagree about his plots being cliche and boring to the point of absurdity. When he was writing them over 400 years ago, they were cutting edge!
Make Another World.

Offline Doctor_Chill

  • RPG Ringleader and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3774
  • Gender: Male
  • You've been pugged.
    • Acerbic Writing
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2012, 10:31:18 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D
“It’s a dangerous thing, pretense. A man ought to know who he is, even if he isn’t proud to be it.” - Tomorrow the Killing, Daniel Polansky

For book reviews - https://acerbicwriting.com/

Offline Lor

  • Pictish Wonder
  • Master Namer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2474
  • Gender: Male
  • Queen of the Pirates
    • The Marketplace of Opinions
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2012, 10:32:14 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye." - Miss Piggy

Offline Doctor_Chill

  • RPG Ringleader and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3774
  • Gender: Male
  • You've been pugged.
    • Acerbic Writing
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2012, 10:34:55 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)

Hey now. I'm a Southern Baptist. :)
“It’s a dangerous thing, pretense. A man ought to know who he is, even if he isn’t proud to be it.” - Tomorrow the Killing, Daniel Polansky

For book reviews - https://acerbicwriting.com/

Offline Autumn2May

  • Word Mage
  • Administrator
  • Khaleesi
  • ***
  • Posts: 2850
  • Gender: Female
  • Does the noise in my head bother you?
    • The Write Way To Type - Writing Blog
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2012, 10:41:15 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)

Hey now. I'm a Southern Baptist. :)

Yeah, we've had some problems with that in the past though. Religion is just one of those button pushing topics for a lot of people.

On topic my favorite Shakespeare play is Macbeth. I love the story and the setting, but I also love that saying it drives theater people bonkers. ;D

Offline Lor

  • Pictish Wonder
  • Master Namer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2474
  • Gender: Male
  • Queen of the Pirates
    • The Marketplace of Opinions
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2012, 10:45:00 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)

Hey now. I'm a Southern Baptist. :)

Yeah, we've had some problems with that in the past though. Religion is just one of those button pushing topics for a lot of people.

On topic my favorite Shakespeare play is Macbeth. I love the story and the setting, but I also love that saying it drives theater people bonkers. ;D

not just theatre people, it puts the fear in us Scots ;)

Fun fact; the castle Macduff, mentioned in hte Scottish Play, used to stand on the hill in my town, and is the reason my primary school was called Castlehill :)
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye." - Miss Piggy

Offline Autumn2May

  • Word Mage
  • Administrator
  • Khaleesi
  • ***
  • Posts: 2850
  • Gender: Female
  • Does the noise in my head bother you?
    • The Write Way To Type - Writing Blog
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2012, 11:01:42 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)

Hey now. I'm a Southern Baptist. :)

Yeah, we've had some problems with that in the past though. Religion is just one of those button pushing topics for a lot of people.

On topic my favorite Shakespeare play is Macbeth. I love the story and the setting, but I also love that saying it drives theater people bonkers. ;D

not just theatre people, it puts the fear in us Scots ;)

Fun fact; the castle Macduff, mentioned in hte Scottish Play, used to stand on the hill in my town, and is the reason my primary school was called Castlehill :)

Neat! Always wanted to go to Scotland. Someday...

Offline Nighteyes

  • Juicy dwarf/orc erotica to go.
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6957
  • OH WOW! JUST WORKED OUT HOW TO DO THIS!!!!!
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2012, 11:09:33 PM »
That was hilarious.  ;D

Rowan Atkinson and Hugh Laurie are awesome. Fortunately we're only typing the name of the Scottish play, not saying it, ey? xD

 Oh, you mean MacBeth?

 I find Shakespeare works to be cliched and boring in their plots, to the point of absurdity. The worst offender is, from my limited experience, the Merchant of Venice, where the bad guy is a jewish merchant who has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, and that scene in the end where it turns out that the good merchant's boats hadn't sank so he never was truly in danger of financial loss or bankruptcy. That sounds pretty lazy to me. Since that time, I haven't read anything by Shakespeare, so my views could be biased, but that reading took away pretty much all of my wishes to read his works.

No Fallen One, no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Redemption is offered in one of the most moving and beautiful speeches in the history of theatre.


Shylock:
I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands,
organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same
food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases,
heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter
and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If
you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die?
And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the
rest, we will resemble you in that.
The Merchant Of Venice Act 3, scene 1, 58–68

And Shakespeare plots are sometimes contrived and cliched because that's the tropes he was playing with ... the question is what does Shakespeare want us to take from these tropes, and is he necessarily agreeing with them?  Are Romeo and Juliet really in Shakespare's view the world's greatest lovers?
The Real Powers That Be

Online Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7570
  • Gender: Male
    • Purple Dove House
Re: Shakespeare
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2012, 11:22:21 PM »
On the topic of Shakespeare. You could read the King James' Bible. :P

I've only read two of his plays, Romeo and Juliet and Julius Ceasar. I hated JC. The only redeeming fact about R&J was the ending. But my mother would recommend MacBeth. That's her favorite and she's read quite a bit of his works.

Slightly off topic. A classic you say? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be good. A Study in Scarlet would be the best place to start off at. Or maybe try one of Poe's works, though they're not really long literary pieces. Nonetheless, any thread that talks about classics I am obliged to jump in and recommend those two. ;D

Oi, no slagging off the Bible in my presence please ;)

Hey now. I'm a Southern Baptist. :)

Yeah, we've had some problems with that in the past though. Religion is just one of those button pushing topics for a lot of people.

On topic my favorite Shakespeare play is Macbeth. I love the story and the setting, but I also love that saying it drives theater people bonkers. ;D

not just theatre people, it puts the fear in us Scots ;)

Fun fact; the castle Macduff, mentioned in hte Scottish Play, used to stand on the hill in my town, and is the reason my primary school was called Castlehill :)
I saw a version of MacBeth done by Bell Shakespeare early this year and while Lady MacBeth was awesome the guy playing MacBeth had a really weird interpretation of the character, he seemed to have him confused with Richard III. Anyone ever seen the Rowan Atkinson sketch where he does pretty much every play Shakespeare ever wrote in about 5 minutes, with just narration from one guy? Brilliant stuff.
I will expand your TBR pile.

http://purpledovehouse.blogspot.com