May 27, 2017, 07:06:12 AM

Author Topic: Story Structure  (Read 1706 times)

Offline Peat

Story Structure
« on: August 16, 2016, 01:21:08 PM »
So I came across this Pintrest board elsewhere and it contains tons and tons and TONS of diagrams with suggestions of how to structure your story better. Sticking it here in the hope others also find it useful.

https://www.pinterest.com/robingood/storytelling-plots-and-structures-for-writing-grea/

Okay, 17, not tons. :p
« Last Edit: August 16, 2016, 01:24:34 PM by Peat »
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Offline night_wrtr

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2016, 02:23:29 PM »
Nice find. I haven't looked too closely at many outside of the Hero's Journey or the three Act format.

Offline Tanniel

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2016, 09:39:58 AM »
I'm tempted to just post my replies from the thread at bestfantasy forums, but I'll restrain myself. =P

I am curious if anyone has ever used a structure or template like this, and to what degree they found it useful?
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Offline Lady_Ty

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Re: Story Structure
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2016, 12:01:06 AM »
That is fun, can see I may neglect what should be doing today to play here.  Thanks @Peat  ;D
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Offline cupiscent

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2016, 07:46:07 AM »
I am a big, big, BIG fan of story structures...

...for revisions. Generally, my approach is to write my first draft (as fast but as thoroughly as possible), and only look at structure in my first round of revisions. I find a template or archetype that roughly fits the story I have, and then work to give my story really strong structural bones as I revise it. I mean, there's no point trying to cram a round story into a square hole, but I find that having the structure helps me get my pacing right.

The only time I've tried plotting a story to structure from scratch was as a fun group activity at a convention. The results were interesting, but by myself and for serious I think I would have sputtered out.

Offline G_R_Matthews

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2016, 08:12:02 PM »
Here you go, a tried and tested story structure method :)

http://fantasy-faction.com/2015/plotting-the-a-team-way
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Offline Jmack

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Re: Story Structure
« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2016, 08:19:22 PM »
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Offline Peat

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2016, 09:26:41 PM »
The only template that I've used before is this one

http://ticket2write.tripod.com/mysplot.html

And, well, I hope to show you the fruits of that in... I dunno, six months or so (less for anyone who is fool enough to fancy beta reading).

I've been toying with the idea of a 5 act structure though. I google and lo and behold others are doing it like this -

http://www.storyboardthat.com/articles/e/five-act-structure
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Offline Bradley Darewood

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Re: Story Structure
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2016, 11:04:52 PM »
I'm using probably a 5-act (or 4-act or 6-act depending on where you put the lines)

But basically I hit the principal climax early, then the 4th act (or 4th and 5th) etc are the aftermath (which would be a denoument but instead it's another rising action) which ultimately has it's own twist and decision point/resolution in the final chapter, which is more or less the inciting incident for the series.

I need to go back and figure out what those first acts are b/c it's the beginning of the book (with the "traditional" structure) that's really a mess, the untraditional ending actually reads pretty smoothly.

Offline Peat

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2016, 11:24:52 PM »
What I really need is a story structure that thinks of the story in terms of several climatic events, of ever bigger waves - suspenseful lull and build, violence, suspenseful lull, Violence, suspenseful lull, VIOLENCE, suspenseful lull

VIOLENCE!

Offline Tanniel

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2016, 12:20:29 AM »
I think that's called the "home-away" structure, or something like that, @Peat. Take The Hobbit. We start safe (at Bilbo's place). We meet danger (The three trolls). We go somewhere safe (Rivendell). We enter danger (Goblin-Town). We reach safety (Beorn's house). We meet danger (Mirkwood). We find safety (Laketown). We meet danger (Lonely Mountain/Smaug/battle). We reach the safe conclusion (Bilbo travels home).

Basically, you build your story as a series of events. Every other is safe, every other is danger, alternating throughout. Naturally, the danger has to increase towards the end, so the last danger encountered is the greatest.
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Offline Bradley Darewood

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Re: Story Structure
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2016, 07:04:58 AM »
What I really need is a story structure that thinks of the story in terms of several climatic events, of ever bigger waves - suspenseful lull and build, violence, suspenseful lull, Violence, suspenseful lull, VIOLENCE, suspenseful lull

VIOLENCE!

Take out the suspenseful lulls and you have the Michael Bay Story Structure

Offline Peat

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #12 on: September 08, 2016, 02:29:11 AM »

Take out the suspenseful lulls and you have the Michael Bay Story Structure

Heh. Here is the Michael Bay story structure ;)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF4BT62Haeo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF4BT62Haeo</a>

And thanks Tanniel.
This is the blog of Peat - http://peatlong.blogspot.co.uk/

Offline Peat

Re: Story Structure
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2017, 01:03:51 AM »
*performs the necromantic ritual*

Found a couple of goodies recently



From somewhere on here - http://www.storymastery.com/

And this particularly magnificent thing -



From here - http://www.mdpresley.com/single-post/2016/08/21/Screenplay-Techniques-Adapted-for-the-Novel-Structure-Structure-Structure

Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: Story Structure
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2017, 01:51:42 AM »
Not sure if I mentioned them before, but Larry Brooks' books (Story Engineering is one) are excellent for describing in detail what needs to happen within the various boxes, and his breakdown and analysis of the structure of well known stories is incredibly helpful. He's got a lot of good ideas in other areas as well.
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