Fantasy Faction

Fantasy Faction => Fantasy Resources => Topic started by: NightWrite on July 23, 2015, 03:13:22 PM

Title: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: NightWrite on July 23, 2015, 03:13:22 PM
This was a thread I had originally started in the Writing Group. It was meant as a way to compile useful links to improve our craft, all kept together in an easily accessible thread. After some discussion, however, I realized it was unfair to keep the thread on a board only a handful of people could access. Here in the Fantasy Resources board it can be seen and used by everyone.

The links already listed are ones compiled before recreating this thread. No one will be forced to submit resources. Nor will any be forced to use these resources. This is just for fun. All I ask is you keep the resources limited to those related to writing.

Any books, articles, podcasts, etc. you'd like to share? Post them here. I hope to continually update this first post so people don't have to go searching the thread for them. I'll also reserve the second post, just in case we one day exceed the character cap.

General Writing Advice & Stash
Write About Dragons (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyUHzyUE31r16wUL4vEVRJA) - series of lectures by Brandon Sanderson
Limyaael's Rants (https://curiosityquills.com/limyaael/) - series of rants about writing, some of these are brilliant
Writing Advice (http://riyria.blogspot.com/2011/06/writing-advice.html) - the first of a good series of writing advice articles on Michael J Sullivan's blog (links further down on the right)
Jim Butcher Collection (https://docs.google.com/document/d/11MFT2cJmlrVnGRRhCVlG-e7zIybQyKhR7bQRic5s2RU/edit?usp=docslist_api) - a compiling of advise from author Jim Butcher, compiled into a Google Docs by @Jmack (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/profile/?u=37094)
Lost Ark Transcripts (http://maddogmovies.com/almost/scripts/raidersstoryconference1978.pdf) - a copy of the transcripts from a 1978 story conference dealing with the Raiders of the Lost Ark.
Watt-Evans' Laws of Fantasy (http://www.watt-evans.com/LawsofFantasy.html)

Punctuation, Grammar, & General Word Play
Space and Punctuate Dialogue Correctly: Creative Writing Success Tips  (http://www.be-a-better-writer.com/punctuate-dialogue.html) - guidelines and examples of how to correctly use punctuation in dialogue
Onelook Thesaurus (http://www.onelook.com/thesaurus/?s=faction)

Software
Word Menu (http://www.creativewritingsoftware101.com/word-menu-software.php)

Checklists to Edit By
Creative Writing Tips for Fiction Writers (http://www.be-a-better-writer.com/creative-writing-tips.html) - a checklist writers can use to make their story stronger

Critiques
How to Critique Fiction (http://www.crayne.com/howcrit.html) - I've had this open while writing critiques, and found it a really good prompt that helped me come up with (I think) constructive feedback

Submissions Help
I am your editor (http://www.caroclarke.com/iamyoureditor.html) - article about the submissions experience from the point of view of an editor, really good read

Misc. Links
Outlines Written by Famous Authors (http://flavorwire.com/391173/famous-authors-handwritten-outlines-for-great-works-of-literature)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: NightWrite on July 23, 2015, 03:14:36 PM
*Reserved for the future*
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on July 23, 2015, 04:05:02 PM
I'm not that steeped in the advice of successful writers, but this Jim Butcher's writing blog is one of my go-to resources. You can easily google for it online, but it's in multiple posts, etc. and with some irrelevant crap in the middle. (It was a blog, after all.)

I've put it all into a Google Doc here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/11MFT2cJmlrVnGRRhCVlG-e7zIybQyKhR7bQRic5s2RU/edit?usp=docslist_api (https://docs.google.com/document/d/11MFT2cJmlrVnGRRhCVlG-e7zIybQyKhR7bQRic5s2RU/edit?usp=docslist_api)

(At least, I think I deleted all the irrelevant griping about irritating readers and trolls.)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on July 29, 2015, 07:10:06 PM
Limyaael's Rants (https://curiosityquills.com/limyaael/) - series of rants about writing, some of these are brilliant

good gravy.  you've just cost me hours and hours of my life.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Raptori on July 29, 2015, 09:11:44 PM
Limyaael's Rants (https://curiosityquills.com/limyaael/) - series of rants about writing, some of these are brilliant

good gravy.  you've just cost me hours and hours of my life.
I did say they were brilliant. (http://www.smiley-faces.org/smiley-faces/smiley-face-angel-006.gif) Think I've read about 3/4 of them in total, it took forever but was well worth it!
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on August 10, 2015, 10:48:47 PM
oh!  oh!

it's absolutely impossible that this hasn't been mentioned somewhere else on the site, but as a noob running all over the internet looking for solid writing advice, i found "writing excuses" with brandon sanderson, mary robinette kowal, howard tayler, and dan wells -- it's awesome.

like i said, it's called "writing excuses" and it's a weekly podcast about the art and craft of writing.  (they appear to focus on fantasy)  it's amazing.  they cover subjects like "How Do I Write a Story, Not an Encyclopedia?" and "What Do You Mean My Main Character is Boring?"  it's chock-full of tactical advice and examples -- not just hand-waving, theoretical musings.

they've been at it since '06, i believe, so there are about a bazillion back episodes -- all perfectly relevant.  and it looks like nobody's mentioned them in the forums for a couple years, so i'm bringing them up.

http://www.writingexcuses.com


edit:  *sigh*

of course, i post this and go click a bit.  writing excuses is LITERALLY the first link in this first sticky of this board.  in my defense, on a search, that post showed up for 2011.

so.  um.  bump!
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on August 11, 2015, 12:30:01 AM
oh!  oh!

it's absolutely impossible that this hasn't been mentioned somewhere else on the site, but as a noob running all over the internet looking for solid writing advice, i found "writing excuses" with brandon sanderson, mary robinette kowal, howard tayler, and dan wells -- it's awesome.

like i said, it's called "writing excuses" and it's a weekly podcast about the art and craft of writing.  (they appear to focus on fantasy)  it's amazing.  they cover subjects like "How Do I Write a Story, Not an Encyclopedia?" and "What Do You Mean My Main Character is Boring?"  it's chock-full of tactical advice and examples -- not just hand-waving, theoretical musings.

they've been at it since '06, i believe, so there are about a bazillion back episodes -- all perfectly relevant.  and it looks like nobody's mentioned them in the forums for a couple years, so i'm bringing them up.

http://www.writingexcuses.com


edit:  *sigh*

of course, i post this and go click a bit.  writing excuses is LITERALLY the first link in this first sticky of this board.  in my defense, on a search, that post showed up for 2011.

so.  um.  bump!

[bumped]  Just subscribed to the podcast. If my commute tomorrow sucks, it'll be your fault. ;)  If it's great, it'll be due to the brialliant writer-hosts.  ;D
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on August 11, 2015, 01:23:55 AM
[bumped]  Just subscribed to the podcast. If my commute tomorrow sucks, it'll be your fault. ;)  If it's great, it'll be due to the brialliant writer-hosts.  ;D

story of my life.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Raptori on August 11, 2015, 08:57:20 AM
I listened to a couple of seasons of writing excuses, but got bored with them and found them a little irritating by the time I stopped. Plus everything they cover is done in more detail elsewhere. It'd be cool to follow it if I had some kind of commute, but since I don't it's not really worth it.  :P
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: KaiHerbertz on August 19, 2015, 11:51:14 AM
Agreed, writing excuses is awesome.

As for something (hopefully) not yet mentioned: Rachel Aaron's blog and her writing advice posts (she does one every Wednesday) are great, imho, ymmv. The classic post I always recommend is "How I went from writing 2k words a day to 10k words a day": http://thisblogisaploy.blogspot.de/2011/06/how-i-went-from-writing-2000-words-day.html
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on August 19, 2015, 01:07:13 PM
I've listened to a few Writing Excuses, and so far they're breezy and interesting. I imagine it could get dull over time.

One I listened to had an interview with David Farland, who writes the Runelord series, was Sanderson's and Stephanie Meyers's writing teacher, and currently runs an online writing workshop. ($399 per workshop @ mystorydoctor).

I've been reading his book "Million Dollar Outlines". It suffers some from being a quick conversion from workshop guide to stand alone book (including some glaring editing errors), but it's an overall interesting read. In a lot of ways it's a book of lists: things to do to create impactful plots, things to avoid in different parts of your book...

Have just been going through the section on starting your story, and I recognize a number of things from my own attempts and those of others.

Things not to do (my wording of his points):

> Take more than a page to grab your reader's attention
> Start your story describing the weather
> Have only one character in the opening scene
> Have no conflict of any type in the opening scene
> Fail to give your main character a name right off
> Have your character running for her life from something he doesn't recognize/see/understand (cliche)
> Trick the reader by offering "false suspense" or "false mystery" (his example is, a woman is walking to her car through the mist, and feels someone coming; terrified, she drops her keys; a man materializes and says "Hey, hon, drop your keys? We gotta go get the kids")

And more.

So, interesting book with some useful suggestions.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on August 20, 2015, 06:30:18 PM

OK, almost finished Farland's Million Dollar Outlines and my excitement over it really built in the last 50 pages.

At the end of the book, he summarizes and quotes extensively from a story conference from 1978 about Raiders of the Lost Ark, with Lucas, Spielberg, and Kasdan brainstorming what Kasdan should include in the script. Farland's summary is great; the quotes are great. Here is a link to the full transcript (which I've not read; it's almost 100 pages):

http://maddogmovies.com/almost/scripts/raidersstoryconference1978.pdf (http://maddogmovies.com/almost/scripts/raidersstoryconference1978.pdf)

I really encourage folks to get a copy of the Farland book. It's changing how I'm going to approach my WIP.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Raptori on September 02, 2015, 10:20:54 PM
Watt-Evans' Laws of Fantasy (http://www.watt-evans.com/LawsofFantasy.html)

@ClintACK (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40381) shared this in another thread, I think it's really good. The laws are stated near the top in short form, but the article further down is well worth reading. Obviously loads of popular fantasy (I'm looking at you, Wheel of Time) completely breaks half of these rules, but for me those are the flaws that keep me from liking the books as much as I otherwise might have.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on September 03, 2015, 12:35:15 AM
Watt-Evans' Laws of Fantasy (http://www.watt-evans.com/LawsofFantasy.html)

@ClintACK (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40381) shared this in another thread, I think it's really good. The laws are stated near the top in short form, but the article further down is well worth reading. Obviously loads of popular fantasy (I'm looking at you, Wheel of Time) completely breaks half of these rules, but for me those are the flaws that keep me from liking the books as much as I otherwise might have.

Great read.
And I liked Brust's Rule: Don't explian how it works; Explain how you use it.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: ClintACK on September 11, 2015, 01:43:58 PM

And I liked Brust's Rule: Don't explian how it works; Explain how you use it.

That's a good one.  Reminds me of another.

I can't remember whose rule this is but:  Explain one well-chosen thing in vivid detail, let the reader fill in everything else.

This also works with sci-fi technology.  Explain how slingshotting or LeGrange points work, then just take it for granted that the FTL drive works, and it will still feel like hard sf.  (See Firefly w/ space suited EVAs vs. Star Trek)

Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on November 05, 2015, 02:49:04 AM
Not so much a resource as a very cool link... For those of us who need outlining or are very visual...

It includes several famous authors' written outlines for their plots and novels.

http://flavorwire.com/391173/famous-authors-handwritten-outlines-for-great-works-of-literature
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Adrian_Selby on December 06, 2015, 09:46:46 AM
Link to an article I did on worldbuilding, which is basically outlining a fantastic book for worldbuilding, called Pathfinders, by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, and how it helped me with my fantasy world, Sarun.

http://www.adrianselby.com/2013/07/worldbuilding-how-prevailing-winds-shaped-civilisations-winners-and-losers/

Adrian
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on December 06, 2015, 12:09:01 PM
Link to an article I did on worldbuilding, which is basically outlining a fantastic book for worldbuilding, called Pathfinders, by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, and how it helped me with my fantasy world, Sarun.

http://www.adrianselby.com/2013/07/worldbuilding-how-prevailing-winds-shaped-civilisations-winners-and-losers/

Adrian

I enjoyed the post and it quite interesting. It reminds me, too, of the winds impact on seed dispersion that is prominent in the Guns, Germs and Steel narrative on human history.

@Adrian_Selby (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40894), I also scanned your discussion of The Children Act, and am going to have to add the author to my list. I just saw the movie of Brooklyn, which has a nice connection through the movie actress to your author. I'd be interested in your response to a US book, "The Memory of Old Jack". I found the book, which is generally a quiet thing, so intense emotionally that I about it down for months in the middle before being able to bring myself to finish the read.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Raptori on December 06, 2015, 12:14:32 PM
Link to an article I did on worldbuilding, which is basically outlining a fantastic book for worldbuilding, called Pathfinders, by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, and how it helped me with my fantasy world, Sarun.

http://www.adrianselby.com/2013/07/worldbuilding-how-prevailing-winds-shaped-civilisations-winners-and-losers/ (http://www.adrianselby.com/2013/07/worldbuilding-how-prevailing-winds-shaped-civilisations-winners-and-losers/)

Adrian
Interesting post, enjoyed it.  :)

Have you read Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond? It also explores how the environment shapes civilisation, but focuses instead on the early stages of development: why the earliest civilisations appeared where they did. It's a really good book, plus it's great for worldbuilding - if you apply the principles then you can take another step back in time and determine what places will be more likely to be the cradles of civilisation.

Edit: uh... didn't see Jmack's post when I replied, and the forum didn't give me the "someone else has replied" notice.  :o What was that about minds that think alike?  ???
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Adrian_Selby on December 06, 2015, 07:03:45 PM
Hi both, yes, I've bought Guns, Germs, not got round to it, I have another book somewhere about Greek Fire and chemical warfare in ancient times, can't remember the name of it.  I'll add the Old Jack book to my list too, if it's anything like as intense as 'Stoner' I'm all in :)

Glad you enjoyed the articles too.

Adrian
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on December 06, 2015, 07:37:41 PM
Hi both, yes, I've bought Guns, Germs, not got round to it, I have another book somewhere about Greek Fire and chemical warfare in ancient times, can't remember the name of it.  I'll add the Old Jack book to my list too, if it's anything like as intense as 'Stoner' I'm all in :)

Glad you enjoyed the articles too.

Adrian

Quietly intense. That's my view.  :)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Yora on December 06, 2015, 07:39:20 PM
My perception of Jarred Diamond is that he seems to be rather unconventional in the field of anthropology. But he's poking around in subjects that are often taken for granted and his ideas tend to sound very convincing. I'd be careful citing his books in a science paper, but even if he's mistaken about how early cultures actually developed, his ideas are just pure gold for creating fictional cultures.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on December 07, 2015, 04:03:59 AM
Random stuff :

Sounds of rocket engines from NASA : https://soundcloud.com/nasa/sets/rocket-engine-sounds

But also, these are all the tracks recorded on the golden disk, sent on Voyager 1 and 2, in case aliens pick them up :
https://soundcloud.com/nasa/sets/golden-record-greetings-to-the

and

https://soundcloud.com/nasa/sets/golden-record-sounds-of

In case anyone wants to include comments on these things in their sci fi...
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: alexsbradshaw on January 14, 2016, 09:48:22 AM
I'm a bit late to the party with this one but I've put together a massive list of resources at my blog/website:

https://alexsbradshaw.wordpress.com/resources/resources-for-writers/

It's got some things already mentioned here but hopefully some new ones too :)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Yora on February 27, 2016, 11:55:23 AM
Mythcreants (http://mythcreants.com)
I found this website by acident and they have a lot of great articles related to good and bad writing. Will take me forever to get through all of it.
Title: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on February 27, 2016, 06:16:19 PM
i just found autocrit.com - it's amazing.  it does automated, deep structural analysis on your work and points our variances from the averages from other published works.

it's so good, i signed up for the pro version.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: JMack on February 27, 2016, 10:07:25 PM
i just found autocrit.com - it's amazing.  it does automated, deep structural analysis on your work and points our variances from the averages from other published works.

it's so good, i signed up for the pro version.

Wow. It really is good.
I gulped hard before paying, but I'll find a place for it in the budget.

I'm using it right now on my February story.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Blackthorn on February 28, 2016, 03:34:29 AM
Here's a link to my favorite site for research on dragons. It takes a scientific approach to legends and dragons various abilities. Definitely worth checking out if you plan on writing about dragons. http://www.blackdrago.com/index.html (http://www.blackdrago.com/index.html)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on March 18, 2016, 10:31:46 AM
Here is a very serious link I stumbled on and is of no use to me. I'm looking around for a downloadable/kindle version of a book (the Oxford Handbook of the philosophy of Death) and stumbled on the book on Religion.

These are simply state of the art philosophy books, easy to read, referenced like crazy, ect.

If anyone is interested in the topic of Religion and wants to have a stronger grip on its philosophical repercussions, that would be one of the best books to flick through, since it lacks the sensationalism of many pro or anti religious commentators. It is purely academic.

http://www.ntslibrary.com/PDF%20Books/The%20Oxford%20Handbook%20of%20Philosophy%20of%20Religion.pdf

Also, for those who write about warriors and want to delve in this particular area, here is a link from the british naginata association that gives away very interesting books (see the other interesting works section)

http://www.naginata.org.uk/resources/downloads/


Want to dip your toes in the murky waters of philosophy of Death without paying for Uni? Attend with Yale students with here the first video of a complete course on the topic (YAY!!!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2J7wSuFRl8&list=PLFAFD994B866E80F1

Same goes here with UC Berkeley lectures on Philosophy of Mind (my huge favorite), Society, or languages. Fascinating stuff.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zi7Va_4ekko&list=PL553DCA4DB88B0408
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Lady Ty on March 24, 2016, 12:46:16 AM
Video showing how much effort and the processes needed to make the authentic materials for a copy of an old book. Even with modern appliances like a processor and a chain saw.  ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPK9ZSRViSE


Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on September 15, 2016, 02:33:45 PM
oh!  while we're resurrecting this thread, i realized i hadn't posted my favorite word-finder.

it's one of those "i can't remember that word, but it meant this" or "i need to find a word with an internal rhyme" or "this is the feeling i'm going for, but need a fun word" kind of sites.

technically, you could call it a thesaurus, but it also throws in related words, which makes it my absolute favorite writing tool:
http://www.onelook.com/thesaurus/?s=faction
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: night_wrtr on September 15, 2016, 07:56:29 PM
oh!  while we're resurrecting this thread, i realized i hadn't posted my favorite word-finder.

it's one of those "i can't remember that word, but it meant this" or "i need to find a word with an internal rhyme" or "this is the feeling i'm going for, but need a fun word" kind of sites.

technically, you could call it a thesaurus, but it also throws in related words, which makes it my absolute favorite writing tool:
http://www.onelook.com/thesaurus/?s=faction

I frequent thesaurus.com most of the time, but this looks like a neat tool.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on September 16, 2016, 12:25:16 AM
I use the dictionary and thesaurus app that is installed by default in Mac. It's great because it's instant, and can correct my English (I write in Ulysses without anything telling me I made a mistake, because it keeps my brain fresh!) in one click, or open up and easily browse through thesaurus without Internet or page loading times. Less distraction.

This being said I'm gonna save m3m's link cause I think it could help for these times when I struggle coming up with the word at all and turn in circles on the dictionary.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: The Gem Cutter on September 16, 2016, 12:37:35 AM
Here's a little vocabulary/word tool that I like. It's essentially a theme-organized thesaurus with a visual orientation, for those of us who (like me) who like their information visual.

http://www.creativewritingsoftware101.com/word-menu-software.php (http://www.creativewritingsoftware101.com/word-menu-software.php)

It's cheap and easy to use, and lends itself to researching words in brainstorming mode.

For example, in my WIP, I wanted to organize my school of wizardry using a combination of magical and religious terms, ranks, and structures. So I maneuvered through the tool and identified the words that met those criterion, and then racked and stacked 'em. I hated them! So I then used the tool to go with Roman ranks.

This was a fairly quick process. And I forget the price, like $20? It might have been free when I bought Dramatica. Anyway, I arrived at the below rank structure pretty quickly, and I've stuck with it. A cheap, quick option that got my work done fast.

Cut & pasted from my library, so it's not meant to be clear to anyone but me:

Titles and Ranks of the Year:
High Council - twelve-member council that leads the Year, composed of:
   Exarch Prime - figurehead, facilitator to the High Council. *Not a Proconsul/actual member of the council. Only votes to break stalemates.
   2 Consuls - chief magistrates of the High Council
   4 Tetrarchs/Zeniths:
      Tetrarch Tercia - Vernal Tetrarch
      Tetrarch Satharus - Canicule Tetrarch
      Tetrarch Savina - Autumnal Tetrarch
      Tetrarch Mallenought - Hibernal Tetrarch

   4 Legates:
      Legate Cebrail, Vernal Legate
      Legate Aglacia, Canicule Legate
      Legate Spathas - Autumnal Legate
      Legate Rachtus, Hibernal Legate, Secret Emissary to the Thorn
   
   Celebrant-General Armus (formerly Apex-Celebrant)
   1 Chronicler: Strachtus
   1 Archivist: Prashir
         
Proconsul - generic term for any of the High Council members
Praetor - generic term for a wizard reporting to a Legate responsible for a mission, activity, etc.
Apex - title for a wizard who has legitimately killed another wizard






Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: m3mnoch on September 16, 2016, 12:56:39 AM
I use the dictionary and thesaurus app that is installed by default in Mac. It's great because it's instant, and can correct my English (I write in Ulysses without anything telling me I made a mistake, because it keeps my brain fresh!) in one click, or open up and easily browse through thesaurus without Internet or page loading times. Less distraction.

This being said I'm gonna save m3m's link cause I think it could help for these times when I struggle coming up with the word at all and turn in circles on the dictionary.

that was exactly the way i stumbled into it -- i'd toil at thesaurus.com and fail.  "it's just giving me the same basic words!"
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on October 23, 2016, 10:17:16 PM
Turns out the FBI has plenty of fascinating information on their website, lots of free publications that give you a true glimpse of the state of things.

https://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/serial-murder

Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on November 30, 2016, 11:42:52 PM
Not exactly a resource to share per se, but just found this video on youtube, and found the narrator's analysis of what makes Miyazaki so great very interesting in his description of character building and world-building. I think it's enlightening and worth thinking through for any writer, though it might seem a bit "evident".

[youtube]52raDbtNpa4[/youtube]
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Peat on December 18, 2016, 05:05:48 AM
https://www.writingclasses.com/toolbox/character-questionnaire/proust - Decent pair of questionnaires for those looking to really dig deep into a character.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Mehman on December 18, 2016, 06:27:30 PM
https://www.writingclasses.com/toolbox/character-questionnaire/proust - Decent pair of questionnaires for those looking to really dig deep into a character.

I'm always on the lookout for good character questions as I believe one can't know their characters too well. You've just won the internet today, @Peat ;D!
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Nora on May 04, 2017, 02:59:06 PM
awesome Youtube channel by a guy who does pretty much all you need to do in order to survive, from scratch. Very informative videos. Channel is called "primitive technology" and seeing it done rather than reading about it is useful.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JXZSzSm8AlZyD3nQdBA
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Ashur-is-King on May 16, 2017, 09:47:51 AM
I find some of the best resources are books that can help one understand more of the world. As a case in point, I have to credit The Dictator’s Handbook by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith with much of my understanding of how political systems work.

In a super-condensed nutshell, dictators and absolute monarchs rely on small “coalitions” to stay in power, incentivizing them to act in certain ways that benefit those people by giving them preferential access to resources—often at the cost of the broader society. Democratically-elected leaders, on the other hand, are incentivized to deliver public goods, because they depend on so many people for their positions.

Once you understand that political systems create incentives, and some of the ways in which the key dynamics play out, you’ll never see the world in quite the same way again. It’s a terrific insight for when you’re world-building fictional political systems.

https://www.amazon.com/Dictators-Handbook-Behavior-Almost-Politics-ebook/dp/B005GPSLHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1494924217&sr=8-1&keywords=the+dictator%27s+handbook
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: OnlyOneHighlander on April 23, 2018, 08:35:53 PM
For researching mythology and in particular mythological creatures, I've found Carol Rose's 'Giants, Monsters & Dragons: An Encyclopedia of folklore, legend and myth' really helpful.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Giants-Monsters-Dragons-Encyclopedia-Folklore/dp/0393322114

Now that I think about it, I wonder if the word 'encyclopedia' is related to 'cyclops' in any way.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Rostum on April 25, 2018, 04:39:04 PM
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Now that I think about it, I wonder if the word 'encyclopedia' is related to 'cyclops' in any way.

only in that they are both Greek words. The translation is not good to English but something like all encompassing knowledge.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: The Gem Cutter on April 25, 2018, 05:41:10 PM
They share a common root (round/circular), but the other half of their seeming similarity is a false cognate.
The word "cyclops" literally means "round-eyed" or "circle-eyed". (Greek root "Op" relates to eyes/seeing)

The word "encyclopedia" comes from the Koine Greek, transliterated enkyklios paideia, meaning "general education" from enkyklios, meaning "circular, recurrent, required regularly, general"[9] and paideia, meaning "education, rearing of a child"; together, the phrase literally translates as "complete instruction" or "complete knowledge".
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: Yora on October 27, 2019, 09:47:05 AM
Worlds of Speculative Fiction (https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4gvlOxpKKIiuo3yYSBeOsrT-iSHvDRUb) A 40 part series of 90 minute presentations on philosophy in various fantasy and science-fiction settings.
I've only watched a few videos yet, but found them to be pretty good. Nothing amazingly groundbreaking, but still interesting stuff.
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2019, 09:29:14 AM
A.J. Dalton, who's published a couple of trilogies and short stories anthologies (and written a couple more books, which I've read and deserved to be published!), has branched into non-fiction and published a few books that are useful as resources.

His latest is The Satanic in Science Fiction and Fantasy, to be published in April.

Quote
Satan, Dracula, Sauron, Lord Foul, Darth Vader. The motif of the Satanic Dark Lord is ever-present in science fiction and fantasy, a malign intelligence seeking to thwart the Chosen One.

In the literature of the 1980s and 90s, the Dark Lord is always defeated. However, post-millennium, there are signs that he has finally begun to get the upper hand, as we witness his change from anti-hero to hero.

In this enthralling study, prize-winning author A J Dalton considers how our understanding and characterisation of Satan has developed over time. From early depictions of Satan as a brutal dragon in the Bible, to the playfully seductive friend in the works of Chaucer and Marlowe, to the sympathetic and sensitive vampire of the modern-day, to the alien and unknowable artificial intelligence of tomorrow.

This book provides a starting point for researchers, writers and fans of science fiction and fantasy interested in the development of one of the biggest tropes in speculative fiction.

If you're interested in the subject, please give this book a try and pre-order, as it will help both the author and the publisher (which is a small house) :)
Title: Re: A Writer's Stash - Share Your Resources
Post by: ScarletBea on December 02, 2019, 05:53:53 PM
World-building workshop with N.K. Jemisin (2 hours):

https://www.wired.com/story/nk-jemisin-how-to-write-science-fiction-wired25/?utm_source=CRM&utm_medium=email&utm_content= (https://www.wired.com/story/nk-jemisin-how-to-write-science-fiction-wired25/?utm_source=CRM&utm_medium=email&utm_content=)