February 20, 2018, 07:42:47 PM

Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 44608 times)

Online xiagan

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Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #586 on: December 30, 2017, 11:59:24 AM »
'kay, I have a couple questions:

I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength? My grasp of the English language does not extend to mechanical matters.

Also, should this sentence be:

"Such situations was where skill came in."

or

"Such situations were where skill came in."

(a character only survives a situation due to experience)
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Offline Lady Ty

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #587 on: December 30, 2017, 08:36:03 PM »
Your sentence should read “Such situations were where skill came in.”  because  ‘situations’ are plural. ie he was, they were.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2017, 08:37:52 PM by Lady Ty »
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Offline ArcaneArtsVelho

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #588 on: December 31, 2017, 10:49:06 AM »
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.

Of course, depending on the design, some other type of actuation could be used:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powered_exoskeleton#Actuators
Everything I wrote above is pure conjecture. I don't know what I'm talking about.

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Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #589 on: December 31, 2017, 02:32:49 PM »
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.

Of course, depending on the design, some other type of actuation could be used:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powered_exoskeleton#Actuators
Servo motors do not actually CONTROL movement. They do the movement. They are not used on ANY current powered suit or exoskeleton (both of which exist for medical and military applications). as they are very weak due to small size. Used for wing mirrors, model aircraft, engine throttles.  Servo motors have a built in feedback loop. Other movement systems may use sensors to a main CPU, or for mills and laser cutters, the stepper motors are used with only a limit stop.
Usually fluid or steam operated pistons are used. The power is varied with valves and pumps (or Hydrogen peroxide feeds to create high pressure steam). Stepper motors and DC servo due to intrinsic physics would never suit powered armour. Superconductors won't fix it.

Actual suit control would be by sensing existing muscles, existing nerves, a special glove or eye movement detection camera.

Best to not explain it and avoid detail.

Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #590 on: December 31, 2017, 06:30:35 PM »
Windscreen/windshield
--> which one is Brit and which American??

We use windshield in the US.

Is a fender the bumper?

I would have assumed so because of the term "fender bender," I always thought it referenced the bumper. Apparently not.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-fender-and-a-bumper

Offline ArcaneArtsVelho

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #591 on: December 31, 2017, 07:50:01 PM »
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.
They are not used on ANY current powered suit or exoskeleton...
That may very well be true.
But the question was about a futuristic powered armour. IMO, fluid operated pistons are lot less futuristic.

Servo motors do not actually CONTROL movement. They do the movement.
Well, half of the question was about the actuation. And...
Servo motors have a built in feedback loop.
Yes. There is position feedback, which is used for what? Control.
But sure, you need other sensors and microcontrollers/CPUs for suit/armour control.

Stepper motors and DC servo due to intrinsic physics would never suit powered armour.
Wouldn't know, what with my limited knowledge. But the term "servomotor" doesn't specify the type of motor, so, in a futuristic setting, a new type of motor (and/or gear system) could be used in powered armour. At least to me, it wouldn't be too far-fetched.


But yeah. Wouldn't know.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2017, 07:51:34 PM by ArcaneArtsVelho »
Everything I wrote above is pure conjecture. I don't know what I'm talking about.

I'm a perfectionist but not very good at anything. That's why I rarely finish things.

Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #592 on: January 07, 2018, 02:48:05 PM »

That may very well be true.
But the question was about a futuristic powered armour. IMO, fluid operated pistons are lot less futuristic.


Unless it's basically a fairystory, or fantasy like Marvel you can't break the laws of physics. The future will not make electric motors replace hydraulic or gas powered actuators.

Offline ArcaneArtsVelho

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #593 on: January 08, 2018, 02:39:12 PM »
Unless it's basically a fairystory, or fantasy like Marvel you can't break the laws of physics.
I never suggested breaking the laws of physics. I guess I just have more hope (perhaps misplaced hope?) for technological advancement.

The future will not make electric motors replace hydraulic or gas powered actuators.
Most likely not in all uses.
Can't really say I share your certitude in this matter, though. But since we don't have a time machine, there's really no point in arguing.


But as you said, best not to go into too many details about this stuff.
I hope this has helped Eli to make a decision that works for his story.
Everything I wrote above is pure conjecture. I don't know what I'm talking about.

I'm a perfectionist but not very good at anything. That's why I rarely finish things.

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #594 on: January 08, 2018, 02:48:09 PM »
psst @ArcaneArtsVelho, this discussion has been moved here ;)
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Offline ArcaneArtsVelho

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #595 on: January 08, 2018, 03:57:22 PM »
psst @ArcaneArtsVelho, this discussion has been moved here ;)
Yes, yes. Apologies.  :)

Though I feel that that thread has slightly different spin to it compared to this discussion.

But either way, I'm done.  ;)
Everything I wrote above is pure conjecture. I don't know what I'm talking about.

I'm a perfectionist but not very good at anything. That's why I rarely finish things.

Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #596 on: January 21, 2018, 06:48:12 PM »
Hi, it's the Nordic guy again with a grammar question:

I have a spaceship flying parallel to another one, but lagging a bit behind. Is the word for that still "parallel"?
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Offline tebakutis

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #597 on: January 21, 2018, 07:04:06 PM »
Hi, it's the Nordic guy again with a grammar question:

I have a spaceship flying parallel to another one, but lagging a bit behind. Is the word for that still "parallel"?

Seems reasonable to say yes. If you consider their flight routes/direction, they remain parallel, so that seems correct to me.

Offline Bradley Darewood

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #598 on: January 21, 2018, 09:22:10 PM »
Tandem? Why not just say trailing?

Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #599 on: January 22, 2018, 05:23:44 PM »
Tandem suggests directly behind. Which is a seriously bad idea with any normal space reaction drive.
A terminal idea with some kinds of drive even at a serious distance.  :D
Parallel is really really a good idea, you don't have to be "level".