January 19, 2018, 09:27:39 AM

Author Topic: Politics and other ailments of the real world  (Read 126862 times)

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2550 on: December 18, 2017, 09:32:47 PM »
Rule of thumb any service that is run for profit will concentrate on the profit and not the service.
Once a system is run for profit it will never improve the service.
Most civilised countries provide free education, it is in their interests to do so.

The UK English (thanks to 40 Scottish MP's) education system was royally fucked over and is currently unaffordable and unfit for purpose. Yeah we adopted those American racketeering methods here.
Everything is monetised from parking on campus to playing social football. The dean of Bath university recently resigned over pay. Local politicians on the board had stepped down in protest of her £480,000 pay packet. Over 5x what the MP's got. There is no justification for anyone to be paid that much and the people who pay for it are the students. Grades are not increasing and there have been resignations over dumbing down in the last decade.
Bear in mind massive annual price increases in education and wage stagnation at 2006 levels and the motivation is being taken away from kids to get educated.

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2551 on: December 20, 2017, 04:08:01 PM »
Nobody liked the Orange buffoon before he regressed to playground bully but this is ridiculous.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-42424666




Offline NightWrite

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2552 on: December 22, 2017, 03:42:40 PM »
Maybe his plan to "Make America Great Again" involves turning the US into an isolationist state by burning all the bridges we have with the rest of the world. He certainly has no problem trying to cut our country off from another with a wall, why not cut us off in other places too. If no one is willing to talk to us of course we'll have to put ourselves first, focus on American jobs and such.

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2553 on: December 22, 2017, 05:47:30 PM »
An isolationist America has been good news for the rest of the world in the past and would be in line with Republican policy. unfortunately Trump is not a Republican as many are starting to realise.

Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2554 on: December 23, 2017, 06:59:04 AM »
He's one of those fools who think greatness has some kind of genetic (dare I say racial?) component. So he's squandering our nation's imperfect credibility and (mostly) good reputation in the mistaken belief that people trade with, work with, and support us out of fear or lack of other options. I think we'll look back in 5 years (assuming our continued existence) and see this as the period just before China's skyrocketing ascension as a world power internationally.
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Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2555 on: December 23, 2017, 07:39:47 AM »
Yeah. This reminds me of Trump's overseas trip, and bizarre belief that heads of state could be cowed with obnoxious handshakes. I mean, he honestly seems to believe that, given how deflated he looked when Emmanuel Macron turned his bullshit back on him.

This sad, pathetic man is obsessed with appearing strong but has an utterly degraded, infantile understanding of what strength is.
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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2556 on: December 23, 2017, 10:44:06 AM »
I don't know who originally said it, but the best summary of Trump is still this:

"Donald Trump is a weak man's idea of a strong man."
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Offline Peat

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2557 on: December 23, 2017, 11:08:45 AM »
The way I view free education (to return to a topic a few light years after the discussion) is to view Government spending as an investment in the country. Its like a company deciding how to reinvest the profits or whether to give back to the shareholders. When a Government invests in education, it is investing in training its future employees and its ability to do R&D.

How much can a company cut training and R&D compared to their competitors before it will eventually bite them in the bum?

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2558 on: December 23, 2017, 01:41:29 PM »
Yeah free education is investing in your people for the future.
On the subject of R&D the only nation growing what it spends in research is China (cos they make everything) The first world has declined the amount per head for decades, does not bode well. When you don't do anything or make anything how do you pay for anything?

Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2559 on: December 26, 2017, 05:40:57 PM »
The way I view free education (to return to a topic a few light years after the discussion) is to view Government spending as an investment in the country. Its like a company deciding how to reinvest the profits or whether to give back to the shareholders. When a Government invests in education, it is investing in training its future employees and its ability to do R&D.

How much can a company cut training and R&D compared to their competitors before it will eventually bite them in the bum?
I would agree with that, but unfortunately that's not what everyone here goes to college for. You see, our education system is hellbent on telling everyone they should go to college, and giving them good enough grades to get in. So then they graduate High School and, having received no vocational training, they go to college and expect it to solve their problems.

Predictably it doesn't. Because they're not meant for college, a couple of things happen.
A. they're not meant for the academic work, fail, and drop-out.
B. they have no idea how to manage time and money, spend too much of it drinking, fail, and drop out.
C. They have absolutely no idea what they want, so they spend 6 years changing majors until they're mature enough to have a plan. This is not necessarily a negative, but paying 10000 dollars a semester is not the way to figure out your life.

At schools with weaker admissions, only 32% of students graduate with a Bachelor's degree within 6 years. The tougher the admissions policy, the higher the graduation rate. The highest is 88%.
https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=40

So, if the government could select the people likely to succeed in a college environment, it would work well. But from my understanding, that's not what the people advocating for free college want. They want unconditional free college. And even people agreeing on a system for paying for college would be complicated. Do you base it on GPA? Should professors give reviews on their student's performance? Should they be required to take a minimum number of hours? Again, from my understanding, no one even has a clear plan on how to do this and what system would reliably work. If someone could present one, perhaps I could get on board with the system.

Another problem. If colleges know the government is paying for it, their prices will go up. They're start building more elaborate gyms and dorms. They'll make the food more luxurious. Unless the government sets a standard that they're willing to pay colleges and no higher, you have a new problem. In my opinion, lots of these dorms need to be remodeled. I'm guilty of this myself. I love having my own room. But if the government's paying for it, we should suck it up and learn how to get along with a room mate. Cafeterias don't need to be this incredible buffet. Keep it simple, and teach us how to be thankful for the food we're provided, especially since we're not throwing ourselves into personal debt. But that won't happen.

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2560 on: December 27, 2017, 01:54:51 PM »
Free with qualifications then? You need to get the grades or do an access courses as a mature student to get your place. I am inclined to agree higher education can be a clearinghouse for shiftless youth with no direction or likelihood of qualifying if there is no cost involved.someone I knew was very good at academia and got nine years free education with various bursaries and benefits mainly because he enjoyed university life. He now works for the inland revenue nothing to do with his qualifications Andi's vastly over qualified for what he does, like many in the UK.

There is always the option of free education but billing those who drop out or fail to make the grade. This was first suggested  50 odd years ago.

Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2561 on: January 02, 2018, 09:40:40 AM »
To steer the topic away from American politics for a moment: How has Emmanuel Macron been doing? I remember his election was considered a ray of hope when the West had seemed to be collectively losing its mind.
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Offline Bradley Darewood

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2562 on: January 04, 2018, 10:23:00 AM »

Wish I had an answer for you man!  I think Nora doesn't often frequent this thread so you might need to direct her here...

I hate to return to America, but this is from the WSJ a relatively conservative newspaper: http://www.wsj.com/video/the-trump-bannon-rift-what-are-the-implications/2886C9E5-3F51-4865-8149-53AE883839A3.html

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2563 on: January 12, 2018, 07:18:14 AM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42657954

Good news for England. I am counting on America impeaching him before I have to protest a state visit.

Offline tebakutis

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #2564 on: January 12, 2018, 02:56:56 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42657954

Good news for England. I am counting on America impeaching him before I have to protest a state visit.

He cancelled the trip because he didn't think he would be "made welcome".

Get used to that, asshole.