December 12, 2017, 08:17:10 AM

Author Topic: Why I don't generally recommend self-publishing.  (Read 7191 times)

Online Peat

Re: Why I don't generally recommend self-publishing.
« Reply #45 on: November 25, 2017, 07:59:21 AM »
Thanks for the correction then Bradley - that's some very poorly written stuff on their part.

I don't suppose it said how many authors of each type there are? Computer's acting up or I'd open it myself.


And cupiscent raises some fair points (particularly libraries). But there are some readers I know who increasingly read SP only because its cheaper/they like looking for gems in the rough. I also think really die-hard one subgenre only fans (i.e. mil sci-fi) are far more likely to go to SP to get their fix.

I'd also point out that, issues about not controlling your price point withstanding, there's no reason an author can't learn how to do their own marketing and advertising and go to town on their trad published book. And while you can't control your price point, you can open a lot more doors for places to go and people to talk to with a trad published book. Not least arts council funding - I know one author who did better on one book alone before it was published than all of the others put together just down to that.

And while we sit here talking SP vs Trad, I'd point out the happiest looking column on that graph is Hybrid.

Offline Not Lu

Re: Why I don't generally recommend self-publishing.
« Reply #46 on: November 26, 2017, 06:15:26 PM »
And while we sit here talking SP vs Trad, I'd point out the happiest looking column on that graph is Hybrid.

The reason for this is a lot of hybrid authors get there with a big hit self published book then sell their print rights, foreign rights, etc. Some of them go on to sign a contract for full rights on the next book or series, but it's not super common for the big hitters in self publishing. They don't see the value of the publisher for their ebook rights.

The other authors that end up hybrid get a book deal with a publisher and build an audience, but then the publisher doesn't want their next work. They leverage their existing audience to sell it and subsequent books as self published.

The common thread is that hybrid authors were successful to some extent before going hybrid. So, it makes sense that they're more successful as a group. Add to that the indie and trade published stats lose authors who crosses over and that group has a big advantage statistically speaking.