April 21, 2018, 04:55:06 AM

Author Topic: An example of distinct style  (Read 280 times)

Online The Gem Cutter

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An example of distinct style
« on: January 17, 2018, 12:09:28 AM »
So we've had a number of terrific discussions on several topics that all point to style, and by that, I mean the collection of writer's choices in a wide range of key areas. Our discussions have ranged from determining whether to accept feedback, which rules to follow, and others - that all should be driven, in my opinion, by what it is we're trying to do. I use the word "do" because the book should do some things to the audience, and by that I mean something more specific than the true but undecipherable "entertain". We have to have specific goals for specific bits: produce shock, cultivate empathy for our protags, reader animosity for our villains, and ... whatever other entertaining situations we can contrive.

Again, the point is that before we can determine the validity of a guideline or concept or feedback is we have to know what we're trying to do. We have to make stylistic choices, and then execute them. And we should take feedback based on the execution of those ideas.

I came across this video, one of a series that does a wonderful job of looking at filmmakers and the kinds of stylistic choices they tend to make. I think this is a useful guide - for example, with some exceptions, the work I want to produce will align more closely with Christopher Nolan's favored approaches to films. I don't juggle timelines, for an example of where we differ in our objectives. ( @Justan Henner & @Not Lu - I'd be interested if you see any similarities in style between my WIP and this video's description of Nolan's work)

Anyway, we often discuss things from an execution standpoint, and this is probably several points past the area we should be focusing on. What are we trying to do and how do we plan to do it are critical prerequisites for determining A) whether we're doing it B) how well, and C) how we should carry the story forward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQek7H9fHZs



« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 12:12:43 AM by The Gem Cutter »
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline Yora

Re: An example of distinct style
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2018, 08:46:27 PM »
Storytelling is ultimately an art and not a craft. There are many methods and approaches that have proven themselves as useful ways to accomplish certain results. But the choice of what results you want to incorporate into your storytelling are purely a matter of personal preference. And because of this, no rule can ever be universally applicable. Any useful advice can always only state that Method A has worked many times to succesfully create Effect B. If you want Effect B, then it would be very much worth the shot to try out Method A. Or we could even advise that someone trying to go for Effect B probably shouldn't attempt to make it work by using Method X.

But ultimately, it always comes down to the writer liking the final result. Not convincing others that the methods are objectively better than others, but personally liking the result.

Good writing advice is recommending suitable tools for different jobs. Telling others what their results should be is not good advice.
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Offline Justan Henner

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Re: An example of distinct style
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 05:59:34 PM »
I came across this video, one of a series that does a wonderful job of looking at filmmakers and the kinds of stylistic choices they tend to make. I think this is a useful guide - for example, with some exceptions, the work I want to produce will align more closely with Christopher Nolan's favored approaches to films. I don't juggle timelines, for an example of where we differ in our objectives. ( @Justan Henner & @Not Lu - I'd be interested if you see any similarities in style between my WIP and this video's description of Nolan's work)

Hmm. Mostly I'm finding that it's kind of hard to take someone else's interpretation of a film and compare it to my interpretation of a book, haha.

Spoiler for Hiden:
Ambiguous morality, yes. Literary equivalent of mood lighting, yes - it's a different thing, but similar idea about setting tone and mood through descriptive cues. There's certainly a sense of mystery with regard to the apeiron, though your work is far more personal - I'd say that's a good thing in that the mystery of the character tied into the mystery of the magic is what drives the plot.... whereas inception was pseudo-scientific nonsense posing as a mystery.