January 20, 2018, 11:09:31 AM

Author Topic: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?  (Read 680 times)

Offline Skip

Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2018, 03:20:04 PM »
They're more what you call guidelines than actual laws ....

Offline Lady Ty

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Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2018, 06:07:15 AM »
My apologies for not returning to this thread, having started it, we have had a week of extreme heat and I couldn’t cope well. Tomorrow should be cooler and I will read properly.  ;)
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Offline Ryan Mueller

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Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2018, 06:27:48 AM »
I've always liked the idea that you get "One Big Lie." It may not be strictly one thing, but it makes sense to me.

Obviously, you can have magic and creatures and such that break the laws of physics. But if regular people (those with no magical talent) are breaking laws of physics left and right, it makes your magic less interesting. Magic is interesting in part because it breaks the laws of physics. If you play fast and loose with those laws everywhere in your book, then your magic loses a lot of its impact.

Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #33 on: January 14, 2018, 06:53:12 AM »
Magic is interesting in part because it breaks the laws of physics. If you play fast and loose with those laws everywhere in your book, then your magic loses a lot of its impact.
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Offline Rostum

Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2018, 09:49:53 AM »
I recently forced myself through the Emperors Blades and while the story had stuff going for it, the book was constantly let down by people not dying through the authors laziness to actually research what he was writing about or the consequences thereof. Burying someone for a week in the ground in tundra described as having snow on the ground walking over mountains without food shelter clothing etc. then the rational for actions was often twisted round breaking people makes them broken not in some way tougher. This made reading it a chore.

Offline SevasTra82

Re: Should Fantasy adhere to the Laws of Science, Physics in particular?
« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2018, 04:27:24 PM »
I don't think fantasy books should adhere to anything real-world.  It's kind of like saying "hey, this is a medieval book, therefore it must have castles in it!"

Ok, maybe not that extreme, but you get my point  :)

I once witnessed Mary Robinette Kowal go off on a guy on Twitter because the guy told her that there was no such thing as a black viking, therefore her story shouldn't have any in it.  It unnerved me so much that I did a Youtube rant on the subject, lol.

So yea, works of fiction can have any laws they want in it, IMO :D