November 18, 2019, 07:31:00 AM

Author Topic: What is the nature of dragons?  (Read 2699 times)

Offline Dark Squiggle

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2018, 03:12:59 PM »
As an artist, I hate 4 legged dragons. There simply isn't enough room on a body for big breast muscles to drive wings and the shoulders and chest muscles for forelegs. Every 4 legged dragon drawing or painting I've ever seen omits muscle and joints and/or hides them. It doesn't bother me much when the have wings that sprout from the back like an angel or bumblebee sized wings, as these are stylistic anyway. My .02, and slightly irrelevant, I know.

How can they move about on land with only two legs?
Either like with their legs under them, like birds and dinosaurs, or by using their wings as legs, like vampire bats.

I find that you can have dragons without actually having them. Intelligent spaceships, anthromorphized trucks, men of war, \any real central monster are all dragons.

Offline NedMarcus

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2018, 12:41:18 AM »
Either like with their legs under them, like birds and dinosaurs, or by using their wings as legs, like vampire bats.

Like a T-Rex might be good—can't really see them hopping about as birds though.

Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2018, 01:21:41 AM »
One thing I find most compelling about all of Tolkien's dragons is their ability to cast spells. Glaurung bewitched people leading to all manner of tragedies that hurt the heroes hearts in ways fire and claws never could.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Offline Dark Squiggle

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2018, 04:53:47 AM »
Either like with their legs under them, like birds and dinosaurs, or by using their wings as legs, like vampire bats.

Like a T-Rex might be good—can't really see them hopping about as birds though.
More like an emu than a sparrow.

Offline Alex

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2019, 11:23:28 AM »
I can recommend a good anthology that is all about dragons and has a variety of perspectives. It's called Dreamtime Dragons and edited by Nils Visser. The stories are well above par and the profits go to an animal sanctuary.

Offline Matthew

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2019, 11:32:17 PM »
I love the dragons in Naomi Novik's series (they're bloody adorable but ferocious with all the draconian qualities that act as mirrors to our own).

If you're at all into shapeshifting and magic, I'd recommend the Heartstriker series by Rachel Aaron. Very full world.

Both of these are good because they incorporate dragons into the world rather than having them just tacked on as they so often are.

I recently read Dragon of Ash & Stars: The Autobiography of a Night Dragon. Really enjoyed that too.

In short, dragons should be possessive hoarders full of bloodlust in their early years (or centuries) who grow into their wisdom. I don't care what they look like or how they live, just that they can represent the best and worst in us.

Offline Bender

Re: What is the nature of dragons?
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2019, 02:32:21 AM »
I like them in Eragon and Paolini's Inheritance Cycle. Also in Malazan.

They are ancient, knowledgeable and magical...not always good. Treasure hoarders.
Not all those who wander are lost