May 19, 2019, 06:05:09 PM

Author Topic: What's your jersey?  (Read 38086 times)

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6873
  • Total likes: 4691
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • View Profile
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2015, 12:22:01 PM »
I think we should have Photos of the Kits the Players wear and Photos of the Mascots  :)
Ugh I hate mascots, so cheesy! But yeah, kits I guess would be good...  :D

In order:

Tottenham, Arsenal, Chelsea, West Ham United, Everton, Sunderland;
Manchester United, Queens Park Rangers, Swansea City, Crystal Palace, Southampton, Manchester City;
Aston Villa, Leicester City, Liverpool, Burnley, West Bromwich Albion, Stoke City.

 8)
This is looking like Nascar where there isn't a spare piece of uniform or race car not plastered in ads.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline Raptori

  • Barbarian who does not use the Oxford comma and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4054
  • Total likes: 2111
  • the prettiest kitty cat in the world
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2015, 12:25:57 PM »
I think we should have Photos of the Kits the Players wear and Photos of the Mascots  :)
Ugh I hate mascots, so cheesy! But yeah, kits I guess would be good...  :D

In order:

Tottenham, Arsenal, Chelsea, West Ham United, Everton, Sunderland;
Manchester United, Queens Park Rangers, Swansea City, Crystal Palace, Southampton, Manchester City;
Aston Villa, Leicester City, Liverpool, Burnley, West Bromwich Albion, Stoke City.

 8)
This is looking like Nascar where there isn't a spare piece of uniform or race car not plastered in ads.

Haha yeah it does at a glance, though for some reason English football teams only put one sponsor on their kits. Some foreign teams, on the other hand...

I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6873
  • Total likes: 4691
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • View Profile
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2015, 12:39:10 PM »
So for once, the money-grubbing U.S. keeps it pure.  ;)
Well, except for Nascar and the names of stadiums.  ;D

Here are the baseball Baltimore Orioles:
the mascot is just "the Oriole bird"




And the Baltimore football Ravens:
the mascot is "Poe", because Edgar Allen lived here for a scrap of his life and we've claimed his scrawny self.



Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6873
  • Total likes: 4691
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • View Profile
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2015, 12:49:20 PM »
Do you have relegation in American sport?

Nope. Here's how it goes:

American football: No professional "minor league" teams. Players almost universally come through colleges and are drafted. Pro teams that suck just keep sucking. But it would be grand to see the college champion move up to the pros... except that the worst pro team will always kill the best college; it's just that hard.

Baseball: Huge minor league system. All minor league teams are affiliated with a pro team, which uses them as a training academy and pro player rehabilitation setting. There are four or five levels of team from "rookie league" to "Triple-A", with promising players moving up through the scale until they finally reach the bigs. Woe to the pro team that loses to its AAA affiliate in an exhibition - deep embarrassment.

Basketball: There is a league for small cities, but the pro league just pretends it doesn't exist. Like football, the players mostly come through college. In football and basketball, college sports are an American religion.

Hockey: Works a bit similarly to baseball.

Soccer: No one knows. No one pays attention. (Well, indoor soccer maybe. But the Baltimore Blast are the winningest team in pro indoor soccer, and they pack 'em in at maybe 6,000 fans a game.)
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline Yora

Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2015, 03:10:44 PM »
I don't follow any games and don't know any of the current players, but I am still hoping Hamburg SV is getting back on track and not going down to 2. league. Because Hamburg is the only German football team that never once dropped down a tier in 127 years. No matter how German football was organized, they've always been first tier.



The season has still 6 games to go, but right now they are on last place and need to go up two spots to get into relegation. Three up and they'd be safe another season. It's pretty close at the bottom of the league now and if they win the next game they are out of the death zone again.
But it's been like that for a while and it seems the legend is coming to an end.
Beneath the Leaves of Kaendor

There is nothing to read!

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7060
  • Total likes: 712
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Purple Dove House
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2015, 12:13:45 AM »
We can do things the way we do, because we're a little smaller in terms of total supporter base, although the MCG can hold 100,000 people. I've been to a game with more than 95,000 and believe me that is packed. Once the crowd getting going particularly if they belt out 'Yellow and Black!' in full voice it can really raise the roof. I do kind of miss the old days when we could decide to go to the game in Saturday morning, rock up after 12:00, buy a bag of donuts on the way in, get a record, and a ticket, watch the twos and then the main game. Now you can still get general admission, but most people are either members, or they've booked ahead. The record costs $5 (it used to be 50 cents) and the donuts are far too expensive, you have to take out a second mortgage on your house if you want to buy food inside, and no teams have reserves sides now and even if they did it isn't played as a curtain raiser in the G. As a Richmond member if our VFL team are playing at Punt Rd before the game I can go in and have a look, but the standard's pretty low.
Er, I think there must be 83 instances of impenetrable jargon in those few sentences. Records? Is that a program in my lingo? Reserve sides = home and away sides? Twos? Curtain raiser? No clue. Standards pretty low?
Yep, a record is a program sort of. Most people only use them now because they list all the players and their jumper numbers for both sides, so you can keep track of who is who. I generally listen to a radio broadcast of the game while I'm watching, so I can keep up with the action when it's on the other side of the ground from where I sit. I can look at the scoreboard, which shows vision of the game, but you miss things that way. Back in the dim dark days when the AFL was still called the VFL, every team (we only had 12 back then, now we've got 18), had 3 sides. You had a senior side (the older guys, the better guys, who got picked week in, week out), a reserves or twos side (also known as the Magoos in rhyming slang), which comprised the guys who weren't so good or were returning from injury and then the thirds or under 19's, made up of as the name suggests players under 19 years of age. Then when the VFL became the AFL and admitted a whole bunch of other sides from outside Victoria and moved South Melbourne to Sydney, it abolished the reserves and turned the under 19's competition into the under 18's and established a league of their own to look after the juniors. The clubs allied themselves with sides in the lower competition, which changed it's name from the VFA to the VFL. The season is comprised of 23 rounds of home and away games (each team plays roughly 11 games where they are the 'home' team and 11 where they are the 'away' team), where the teams all play each other. The best 8 teams play off in the finals, which go over a few weeks, and culminate in the Grand Final, where the 2 teams that won the previous week's preliminary finals play each other for the Premiership. Never heard of a curtain raiser before? It's a prelude to the main event. Hence when they played a reserves game before the main game, it was referred as a curtain raiser. The standard in the VFL is lower than that in the AFL, it's a lesser competition, so it only stands to reason. In baseball terms it would be like watching AAA match as opposed to a Major League one, and the AAA teams tend to serve the same purpose as the VFL and the other state leagues do to the AFL, they're feeder leagues, where the sides can farm their players out to and nurture them to get them ready one way or another for the big league. The best place to go for information is AFL.com.au.

Offline Raptori

  • Barbarian who does not use the Oxford comma and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4054
  • Total likes: 2111
  • the prettiest kitty cat in the world
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2015, 06:56:17 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7060
  • Total likes: 712
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Purple Dove House
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2015, 07:14:41 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
Have you seen how many people are on the bench in an NFL game? There's a whole second team there. I think the college system sort of negates the need for feeder teams in the way we have them in Australia, the UK and Europe.
I will expand your TBR pile.

http://purpledovehouse.blogspot.com

Offline Raptori

  • Barbarian who does not use the Oxford comma and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4054
  • Total likes: 2111
  • the prettiest kitty cat in the world
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2015, 07:25:42 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
Have you seen how many people are on the bench in an NFL game? There's a whole second team there. I think the college system sort of negates the need for feeder teams in the way we have them in Australia, the UK and Europe.
Nope, I don't think I've ever been able to stomach more than a minute or two of american football in one go.  That'd partially explain it I guess, really strange though. I do find the popularity of college sports extremely weird actually, it's just so alien.  :P
I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7060
  • Total likes: 712
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Purple Dove House
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2015, 07:32:43 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
Have you seen how many people are on the bench in an NFL game? There's a whole second team there. I think the college system sort of negates the need for feeder teams in the way we have them in Australia, the UK and Europe.
Nope, I don't think I've ever been able to stomach more than a minute or two of american football in one go.  That'd partially explain it I guess, really strange though. I do find the popularity of college sports extremely weird actually, it's just so alien.  :P
NFL have players whose sole reason for being on the team is to simply kick the ball a few times a game. We've had a few ex AFL players enjoy success as kickers over there. A couple of them actually laid tackles, which is always surprising to the commentators over there, because kickers aren't generally meant to tackle. College sports is huge in the US. A friend of mine has a daughter attending university in the States on a tennis scholarship.
I will expand your TBR pile.

http://purpledovehouse.blogspot.com

Offline Raptori

  • Barbarian who does not use the Oxford comma and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4054
  • Total likes: 2111
  • the prettiest kitty cat in the world
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2015, 07:37:55 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
Have you seen how many people are on the bench in an NFL game? There's a whole second team there. I think the college system sort of negates the need for feeder teams in the way we have them in Australia, the UK and Europe.
Nope, I don't think I've ever been able to stomach more than a minute or two of american football in one go.  That'd partially explain it I guess, really strange though. I do find the popularity of college sports extremely weird actually, it's just so alien.  :P
NFL have players whose sole reason for being on the team is to simply kick the ball a few times a game. We've had a few ex AFL players enjoy success as kickers over there. A couple of them actually laid tackles, which is always surprising to the commentators over there, because kickers aren't generally meant to tackle. College sports is huge in the US. A friend of mine has a daughter attending university in the States on a tennis scholarship.
Yeah I remember that being referenced once by commentators in a football match - a manager subbed on a player in the last minute just so he could take a penalty, which is naturally incredibly unusual.

Don't even mention American commentary! Makes me shudder. Sometimes I have to watch American coverage of football matches and it's sooooo bad. English commentary isn't great, but it's streets ahead of the US version.  ;D

Yeah that's really odd too, the whole concept of going to college to "study" as an athlete. Studying sports science makes sense, but literally going to college to play sports is just crazy to me.  :P
I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7060
  • Total likes: 712
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Purple Dove House
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2015, 10:26:39 AM »
Interesting, so American sports don't have reserves? Do you have youth teams? The big football clubs in England (and it's the same throughout most of the world) have many teams - first team,  reserves, then a whole host of youth teams that compete within each age group. Considering that there are 92 clubs in the top four divisions in England, and there are hundreds more below that level, that's just a little more widespread than it sounds like it is in the US...  :P
Have you seen how many people are on the bench in an NFL game? There's a whole second team there. I think the college system sort of negates the need for feeder teams in the way we have them in Australia, the UK and Europe.
Nope, I don't think I've ever been able to stomach more than a minute or two of american football in one go.  That'd partially explain it I guess, really strange though. I do find the popularity of college sports extremely weird actually, it's just so alien.  :P
NFL have players whose sole reason for being on the team is to simply kick the ball a few times a game. We've had a few ex AFL players enjoy success as kickers over there. A couple of them actually laid tackles, which is always surprising to the commentators over there, because kickers aren't generally meant to tackle. College sports is huge in the US. A friend of mine has a daughter attending university in the States on a tennis scholarship.
Yeah I remember that being referenced once by commentators in a football match - a manager subbed on a player in the last minute just so he could take a penalty, which is naturally incredibly unusual.

Don't even mention American commentary! Makes me shudder. Sometimes I have to watch American coverage of football matches and it's sooooo bad. English commentary isn't great, but it's streets ahead of the US version.  ;D

Yeah that's really odd too, the whole concept of going to college to "study" as an athlete. Studying sports science makes sense, but literally going to college to play sports is just crazy to me.  :P
I think one of the best rationalisations of college sports that I ever heard came from the movie All The Right Moves. The main character Stef Djordjevic knows that he probably can't make it as an NFL player, but he can do the job in college, so he's basically looking to trade football for an education. My friend's daughter is in a similar situation, she doesn't think she'll make it as touring professional, but she'll get a good solid education, which is all paid for and she doesn't have a HECs debt, which most of her friends here who attend university will have when they finish, plus she'll have had a very different life experience. Lejays17 has at least one friend who attended college in the US on a softball scholarship. You're going there for an education, but you can use your sporting prowess to fund it.

Offline Yora

Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2015, 10:38:03 AM »
Nope, I don't think I've ever been able to stomach more than a minute or two of american football in one go.  That'd partially explain it I guess, really strange though. I do find the popularity of college sports extremely weird actually, it's just so alien.  :P
In Germany, almost all professional football clubs are actual just local sport clubs where people play sports for fun. HSV is actually Hamburg Sports Club and they also got handball, ice hokey, volleyball, table tennis, rugby, and such exotic things like cricket and baseball. They got a total of 73,000 members (though probably not all actively playing right now). Bayern M√ľnchen has 250,000 (and is the largest sport club in the world). There is always a steady supply of new players for the professional teams.
Bayer Leverkusen was created by the Bayer company to provide sport facilities their workers could use after their shifts to improve health and work satisfaction. VfL Wolfsburg was created by Volkswagen for the same purpose. In both cases the professional football teams have now been turned into separate companies, but still keep the old company as their main sponsor.

Offline Raptori

  • Barbarian who does not use the Oxford comma and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4054
  • Total likes: 2111
  • the prettiest kitty cat in the world
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2015, 02:20:01 PM »
@Eclipse your lads had better do us a favour today!  :P
I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline Eclipse

  • Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4007
  • Total likes: 1969
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: What's your jersey?
« Reply #29 on: April 25, 2015, 02:29:18 PM »
@Eclipse your lads had better do us a favour today!  :P

We try our best to beat Liverpool Hopefully Berahino will score ,at this moment in time Liverpool are seventh hehe
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate