June 19, 2019, 10:19:57 PM

Author Topic: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)  (Read 947479 times)

Offline Bender

Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11700 on: May 24, 2019, 02:04:03 AM »
And why is buying a gift so damn difficult?
1. Make sure it's something that'll be liked.
2. Make sure it's not something given last year.
3. Make sure it's within budget.

Simple 3 rules but so difficult as years go by. I can't find anything that's not mainstream and covers all points above.
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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11701 on: May 24, 2019, 02:10:20 AM »
Gift cards!
They do the choosing ;D
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Offline Bender

Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11702 on: May 24, 2019, 06:12:17 PM »
Gift cards!
They do the choosing ;D

My wife detests that. Says it's like a payoff instead of buying a gift.  ;D
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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11703 on: May 24, 2019, 09:53:22 PM »
Gift cards!
They do the choosing ;D

My wife detests that. Says it's like a payoff instead of buying a gift.  ;D
Hmm well... I don't care - although I do admit that I only do this with my sister and now with my dad (gift card for a book/DVD shop, that he uses all the time).
I love receiving bookshop gift cards/book tokens, though! For example, my parents decided to bring me a little something, and got 2 teatowels. More teatowels, I already have a ton - a book token would have been so much better ;D
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Offline Bender

Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11704 on: May 24, 2019, 10:18:32 PM »
I do that with my brother. Gift him Amazon card which he uses solely to buy Kindle books... which I also read anyway. So all's good.
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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11705 on: May 25, 2019, 09:57:25 AM »
What do people have to do  at your place before you realise it's better to be on your own?
Between 1= breathe and 100=try to kill you

For me? 1 ::) gaaaaah
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Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11706 on: May 26, 2019, 02:10:50 PM »
Hmm.

I am seriously considering doing another release here in Iceland. I had sort of promised myself never to bother again, as it never paid off. But I've been made aware of something called the Karolina Fund. There one can advertise a project, much like on Patreon and Kickstarter, and offer reward tiers for donations. If the donations add up the amount I set, then the project will take off.

The idea is to use the money to pay for the printing. I'm thinking of rushing out a viking fantasy novella this summer; about 100 pages/30.000 words. Some of the copies I would owe to donors, but I'd still have the majority left to sell. My marketing skills haven't improved at all since 2015, but at least I wouldn't LOSE money on this one. I might actually make a little, for once.

But if I'm going to set it all up, connect donations and write before university starts up again I'd better decide. And I'll need a cover to advertise the book with.
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Offline xiagan

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11707 on: May 26, 2019, 08:37:41 PM »
Btw, where has @ultamentkiller gone? Justin? You still there?
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Offline JMack

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11708 on: May 27, 2019, 12:00:55 AM »
Hi, guys!
One year ago last Wednesday, the docs sawed open my chest and played switcheroozies with my heart arteries. It was so much fun.

To celebrate, Mrs. JMack and I are going right back up to Buffalo, NY and Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario where I had my heart attack. I’m taking with me “The Three Body Problem”, “The Dragonbone Chair” (a re-read), and “Slaughterhouse 5.” We will read books, drink wine, ride bikes, play games (Rummicube and Perquackey) and try not to fall into Niagara Falls.

Here’s hoping I finish this trip better than the last one!  :D
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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11709 on: May 27, 2019, 02:31:29 AM »
Yay Jmack! Good on you, back on the saddle again, so to speak, hehe

When you return, don't be a stranger for so long!

And yay to see Eclipse back :D
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Online J.R. Darewood

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11710 on: May 27, 2019, 06:09:21 AM »
Glad to have you back @JMack and on such a well-spent anniversary too!
You too @Eclipse  ,  without you it's like Twilight without Jacob.

Here's an update/journal entry about what I've been up to:

Spoiler for Hiden:

Chantacuro

At least three people told me I needed la chantacuro, least of which was Teresa, the motherly owner of the hotel I was staying in. 

"And the chantauro?" she asked as I stepped in, dripping with Amazonian rain.

I lied. Apologetically.  "I couldn't find them." 

She raised an eyebrow. She knew.

To be fair, Puyo is a fairly large town-- it can easily take an hour or two to walk across it-- and the mercado de los platanos is both far and once you get there a labyrinthine maze of both the mundane and the exotic.  It was possible I could have gotten lost.  But she was right, I knew exactly where the mercado was.

I desperately needed sleep, but once again I would get only 4 hours. I had work to do: my budget wasn't going to do itself while I slept.  Slaving away in my room for as long as I could, I stepped back down the open stairwell to the lobby.

Teresa was long gone but Darwin, the night worker, was there.

"Darwin, do you mind if I grab a cup of water to take my medicine?"

"You need to stop wasting money in pharmacies!" Darwin waved his arm dismissivley.  "You need to a chantacuro.  Do you know chantacuro?"

I'd eaten them, protein-starved deep in the Amazon. But here in the city, where I wasn't insanely hungry... it was a lot harder to swallow.

"Yeah. They're bugs."

"They're not bugs!" Darwin hammered away on the computer keyboard, proudly offering a picture of a pile of white, twinkie-sized larvae with hard, red heads squirming on top of each other.

"Yeah I know what chantacuros are."

"That's how I cured my son. While it's still alive, you just rip the head off," he twists his fingers and makes a tossing motion, "put it in a spoon, pour some menthol on it and--bam! You're better! Do you know menthol?"

I know what menthol is but he brings up pictures of Vicks Vapo-rub anyway.  I'm not sure you're supposed to swallow it.

"There's nothing better for asthma!" he proclaimed.

"I have pneumonia, not asthma."

Darwin shook his head.  "It doesn't matter.  They're great for your lungs. They will cure you in one day!"

Teresa's offer was more appetizing than Darwins. "I'll put them in the blender with some fruit and make you a nice liqueado," she had offered.

The few weeks before arriving in Ecuador, I caught pneumonia.  Aside from being exhausted, coughing all the time, and not being able to breathe it really wasn't as bad as I had imagined.  I took some antibiotics, but as soon as they were done I was unable to breathe once again.  Walking around drenched in chilly Amazonian showers all day probably didn't help things much. The latest round of antibiotics was starting to wear off again.  Maybe the chantacuro was my only hope.

The mercado de los platanos meandered in and out of something that looked like a giant airplane hanger, spilling into the blocks around it. It was a series of tables filled with all sorts of unidentified types of meat, fruits, vegetables and herbs I'd never seen before.  Even a handful of curanderos had tables with bark for teas and smudges, sangre de drago (dragon's blood, red sap from a white bark tree that was reputed to cure almost everything), and boa oil (like snake oil maybe?). 

The chantacuros were at the end, squirming around in a pile of shredded red palm.  The wizened old woman selling them seemed surprised that I wanted them, but she was eager to share this piece of her way of life. 

"I hear they're good for pneumonia." I explained.

She nodded emphatically.  "Take three," she said, filling a small plastic container with shredded palm for my new pets to eat. "One each day. Don't cook them. Raw is best."

I'd had them raw. The palm gives them their flavor-- it's almost like eating a palm heart, except for that it squirms in your mouth and white goo pops once you bite into it.  I remembered the experience quite vivildy from my last trip to indigenous villages deep insdie the Amazon. Nope, I was definitely going to do the liqueado. I bought some black berries.

Darwin was happy to make a shake for me once I got back to the hotel. He totally thinks I'm a pussy, I mused.  But I really didn't care.

It was amazing how well the shake tasted.

"Is it working?" Darwin asked.

"Uhh... I don't know." I chomped as I got to the bottom. "Wow these berries are really chewy."

"That's not the berries."

The next day I went to see Chris. He was going to be a partner in the course I'm teaching. A California biologist, bald and with an enormous beard, he had married a Shuar woman in Puyo and come to stay.  Her foundation is in a beautiful natural reserve in the city, where the city turns to jungle.  They offer tours demonstrating how the Shuar make their homes, medicinal plants, and other local knowledge.  Chris's wife was in Miami, successfully doing underground ethnobotanical healing, mostly involving ayahuasca, a hallucinogen used for healing, popularized and fetishized in the US. Even without it's founder, the place had really taken off since I'd last seen it. Chris had scores of volunteers, and had become something of a local doctor, with people from all over the world lining up for medical advice.

"Here, pour this liquid into your hand and snort it," he was saying to a German woman as I arrived.

It got all over her face, and snot started coming out of her nose.  "Yeah, that's great."

While I waited, Chris provided advice on periods to some women from Quito, vetrinary advice to some women from France. I followed along as they chatted in French. She paused before asking about her own health problems.  "There's something terribly wrong with my gums."

Chris nodded. "Have you tried urine therapy."

"Oh no.  No no no.  No."

She left with herbs instead.

"Urine therapy?" I inquired after they left. I knew it was suposed to be sterile and antispetic when it first comes out-- beyond the old folk tale about peeing on snakebite wounds, it's supposed to be the best thing for painful jellyfish stings in Indonesia.  But on your gums?

"There's nothing better!" he said enthusiastically.  "Just hold it in your mouth for 30 minutes first thing in the morning."

"Thirty minutes is a long time to hold anything in your mouth." I wondered how his wife felt about urine therapy. That must be some morning breath.

"It might help you with your cough," Chris offered, "If you try it, you'd be amazed at what comes up out of your system."

Yup. I would.

After making arrangements with Chris to do a workshop on some of his innovative new zero-input technologies for water filtration and waste reduction, I headed back home.

I skipped that urine therapy.  The chantacuro juices really weren't that bad.  Especially compared to drinking pee. 

"Do you feel better?" Darwin asked again, as a I downed another one of his shakes.

My lungs really did feel surprisingly clear.

"Yeah." I said, somewhat bewildered. "Yeah I do."


« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 06:12:13 AM by J.R. Darewood »


Offline Nighteyes

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11712 on: May 28, 2019, 06:08:38 AM »
Hi, guys!
One year ago last Wednesday, the docs sawed open my chest and played switcheroozies with my heart arteries. It was so much fun.

To celebrate, Mrs. JMack and I are going right back up to Buffalo, NY and Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario where I had my heart attack. I’m taking with me “The Three Body Problem”, “The Dragonbone Chair” (a re-read), and “Slaughterhouse 5.” We will read books, drink wine, ride bikes, play games (Rummicube and Perquackey) and try not to fall into Niagara Falls.

Here’s hoping I finish this trip better than the last one!  :D

Oh gawd to last year. Congrats on making it!
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Online ScarletBea

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11713 on: May 28, 2019, 11:21:11 AM »
London people must be used to it, but I was super excited to see a street of my town on TV this Sunday :D
It's supposed to be in the 19th century, so it was very funny to see all the big signs removed and the street covered with packed earth, with the carriages and urchins. Also, they completely removed the buildings of the other side and made it as if it was just fields and stuff :o
Then the characters enter through a door (the local theatre) and into a completely different place!
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Offline JMack

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Re: The King's Paws (with one holding a bottle of Peri Peri sauce.)
« Reply #11714 on: May 28, 2019, 01:26:43 PM »
Glad to have you back @JMack and on such a well-spent anniversary too!
You too @Eclipse  ,  without you it's like Twilight without Jacob.

Here's an update/journal entry about what I've been up to:

Spoiler for Hiden:

Chantacuro

At least three people told me I needed la chantacuro, least of which was Teresa, the motherly owner of the hotel I was staying in. 

"And the chantauro?" she asked as I stepped in, dripping with Amazonian rain.

I lied. Apologetically.  "I couldn't find them." 

She raised an eyebrow. She knew.

To be fair, Puyo is a fairly large town-- it can easily take an hour or two to walk across it-- and the mercado de los platanos is both far and once you get there a labyrinthine maze of both the mundane and the exotic.  It was possible I could have gotten lost.  But she was right, I knew exactly where the mercado was.

I desperately needed sleep, but once again I would get only 4 hours. I had work to do: my budget wasn't going to do itself while I slept.  Slaving away in my room for as long as I could, I stepped back down the open stairwell to the lobby.

Teresa was long gone but Darwin, the night worker, was there.

"Darwin, do you mind if I grab a cup of water to take my medicine?"

"You need to stop wasting money in pharmacies!" Darwin waved his arm dismissivley.  "You need to a chantacuro.  Do you know chantacuro?"

I'd eaten them, protein-starved deep in the Amazon. But here in the city, where I wasn't insanely hungry... it was a lot harder to swallow.

"Yeah. They're bugs."

"They're not bugs!" Darwin hammered away on the computer keyboard, proudly offering a picture of a pile of white, twinkie-sized larvae with hard, red heads squirming on top of each other.

"Yeah I know what chantacuros are."

"That's how I cured my son. While it's still alive, you just rip the head off," he twists his fingers and makes a tossing motion, "put it in a spoon, pour some menthol on it and--bam! You're better! Do you know menthol?"

I know what menthol is but he brings up pictures of Vicks Vapo-rub anyway.  I'm not sure you're supposed to swallow it.

"There's nothing better for asthma!" he proclaimed.

"I have pneumonia, not asthma."

Darwin shook his head.  "It doesn't matter.  They're great for your lungs. They will cure you in one day!"

Teresa's offer was more appetizing than Darwins. "I'll put them in the blender with some fruit and make you a nice liqueado," she had offered.

The few weeks before arriving in Ecuador, I caught pneumonia.  Aside from being exhausted, coughing all the time, and not being able to breathe it really wasn't as bad as I had imagined.  I took some antibiotics, but as soon as they were done I was unable to breathe once again.  Walking around drenched in chilly Amazonian showers all day probably didn't help things much. The latest round of antibiotics was starting to wear off again.  Maybe the chantacuro was my only hope.

The mercado de los platanos meandered in and out of something that looked like a giant airplane hanger, spilling into the blocks around it. It was a series of tables filled with all sorts of unidentified types of meat, fruits, vegetables and herbs I'd never seen before.  Even a handful of curanderos had tables with bark for teas and smudges, sangre de drago (dragon's blood, red sap from a white bark tree that was reputed to cure almost everything), and boa oil (like snake oil maybe?). 

The chantacuros were at the end, squirming around in a pile of shredded red palm.  The wizened old woman selling them seemed surprised that I wanted them, but she was eager to share this piece of her way of life. 

"I hear they're good for pneumonia." I explained.

She nodded emphatically.  "Take three," she said, filling a small plastic container with shredded palm for my new pets to eat. "One each day. Don't cook them. Raw is best."

I'd had them raw. The palm gives them their flavor-- it's almost like eating a palm heart, except for that it squirms in your mouth and white goo pops once you bite into it.  I remembered the experience quite vivildy from my last trip to indigenous villages deep insdie the Amazon. Nope, I was definitely going to do the liqueado. I bought some black berries.

Darwin was happy to make a shake for me once I got back to the hotel. He totally thinks I'm a pussy, I mused.  But I really didn't care.

It was amazing how well the shake tasted.

"Is it working?" Darwin asked.

"Uhh... I don't know." I chomped as I got to the bottom. "Wow these berries are really chewy."

"That's not the berries."

The next day I went to see Chris. He was going to be a partner in the course I'm teaching. A California biologist, bald and with an enormous beard, he had married a Shuar woman in Puyo and come to stay.  Her foundation is in a beautiful natural reserve in the city, where the city turns to jungle.  They offer tours demonstrating how the Shuar make their homes, medicinal plants, and other local knowledge.  Chris's wife was in Miami, successfully doing underground ethnobotanical healing, mostly involving ayahuasca, a hallucinogen used for healing, popularized and fetishized in the US. Even without it's founder, the place had really taken off since I'd last seen it. Chris had scores of volunteers, and had become something of a local doctor, with people from all over the world lining up for medical advice.

"Here, pour this liquid into your hand and snort it," he was saying to a German woman as I arrived.

It got all over her face, and snot started coming out of her nose.  "Yeah, that's great."

While I waited, Chris provided advice on periods to some women from Quito, vetrinary advice to some women from France. I followed along as they chatted in French. She paused before asking about her own health problems.  "There's something terribly wrong with my gums."

Chris nodded. "Have you tried urine therapy."

"Oh no.  No no no.  No."

She left with herbs instead.

"Urine therapy?" I inquired after they left. I knew it was suposed to be sterile and antispetic when it first comes out-- beyond the old folk tale about peeing on snakebite wounds, it's supposed to be the best thing for painful jellyfish stings in Indonesia.  But on your gums?

"There's nothing better!" he said enthusiastically.  "Just hold it in your mouth for 30 minutes first thing in the morning."

"Thirty minutes is a long time to hold anything in your mouth." I wondered how his wife felt about urine therapy. That must be some morning breath.

"It might help you with your cough," Chris offered, "If you try it, you'd be amazed at what comes up out of your system."

Yup. I would.

After making arrangements with Chris to do a workshop on some of his innovative new zero-input technologies for water filtration and waste reduction, I headed back home.

I skipped that urine therapy.  The chantacuro juices really weren't that bad.  Especially compared to drinking pee. 

"Do you feel better?" Darwin asked again, as a I downed another one of his shakes.

My lungs really did feel surprisingly clear.

"Yeah." I said, somewhat bewildered. "Yeah I do."



So fantastic.
Please tell me it’s all true.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com