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Author Topic: Politics and other ailments of the real world  (Read 268792 times)

BeardKing

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #420 on: February 24, 2016, 04:00:13 PM »
Gosh!!!
And you pay to go into ER? Anyone, not just those that are wasting their time?
What if you don't have money, do they let you die?

Yes, you have to pay to visit the ER. If you don't have money, they'll still treat you (they have to by law), but that doesn't mean I don't have to pay it back.

It's very expensive. So my struggles have been to either pay rent and buy food, or to see the doctor. I can't afford to do all three, unfortunately. And that brings me back to stagnant wages. I've been working IT for a law firm for 12 years now and in those 12 years, I haven't seen any significant pay increase. But the cost of living all around me has gone up.

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #421 on: February 24, 2016, 04:03:21 PM »
And for those in the UK this is why you should be fighting the outsourcing of the health service to American medical companies. See which company manages your GP now you may be surprised.

Offline Hedin

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #422 on: February 24, 2016, 04:27:41 PM »
I must say, if you're a political nerd like me, this presidential season has been fun to watch.

It's been fascinating.  I'm going to be interested to see if Trump gets the nomination how it would affect all of the other elections.  Right now Republicans have Congress and have control in a majority of the states, will there be enough anti-Trump voters out there that will sway the control of those areas?

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Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #424 on: February 24, 2016, 05:12:47 PM »

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #425 on: February 24, 2016, 06:30:56 PM »
Pegasus on the left? Or were you talking about Glen Beck  ;D

American street artist living in London trying too hard to monetize everything he does. Banksy he aint.

Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #426 on: February 24, 2016, 06:39:02 PM »
Pegasus on the left? Or were you talking about Glen Beck  ;D

American street artist living in London trying too hard to monetize everything he does. Banksy he aint.

Ah. No idea who the street artist is, but it's a theme I've seen building for a few days/weeks now in a couple left-leaning websites. I was more commenting on that, this just happen to spark the recollection.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2016, 06:41:37 PM by Justan Henner »

Offline Rostum

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #427 on: February 24, 2016, 06:49:51 PM »
I think the serious left is aware of Godwins Law. I am sure Trumps supporters would claim victory the moment he was compared to Hitler in serious debate.

Offline xiagan

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Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #428 on: February 24, 2016, 08:28:47 PM »
Sorry, Beardking. It sounded more generalized and condescending as it was meant. Of course Obama didn't right every wrong and a lot of people hoped for as much change as he promised - which they didn't get.

I still believe that even the best leader, who manages it to make everyone's life significantly better, will hear complaints.
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BeardKing

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #429 on: February 24, 2016, 09:28:43 PM »
Sorry, Beardking. It sounded more generalized and condescending as it was meant. Of course Obama didn't right every wrong and a lot of people hoped for as much change as he promised - which they didn't get.

I still believe that even the best leader, who manages it to make everyone's life significantly better, will hear complaints.

No worries. :)

And you're absolutely right that even the best leader would hear complaints. Such is life.

Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #430 on: February 24, 2016, 10:48:48 PM »

I wish someone had prepared me to find a major in highschool, which would have helped me choose the right college, which then would have put me on the path to a career. Maybe I am just blinded in my age, since its been a while since I was in school, but I don't recall a large effort going into preparing me for life outside of standardized testing.


Sorry to go back in topics a bit, but I thought I'd address this, because I had a fairly different experience.

It's possible that it's a phenomenon that began just as I got into high school, or perhaps its due to the culture in the area I attended school, but as someone who graduated college in 2013, I feel like this warning of "choose a profitable major" was one that was constantly spoken of, at least at the three schools I attended (high school, community college, and at my university, though less so at the university).

There was always that supposedly opposing theme of: "pursue your dreams, find a career you really love, don't settle for anything less!" and it was a pretty powerful theme, which seemed to envelope the majority of schooling, but I feel like that was more something you'd hear from liberal arts teachers, whereas the college/high school counselors were constantly suggesting that we find something worthy of the large investment. At my high school, the standard advice from the counselors was always "if you don't already know what you want to do with your life, go to community college instead of a 4 year. Don't spend the money unless you already have a plan."

I remember I had one teacher in high school that had worked in mechanical engineering most of her career, who was always giving us suggestions on related fields that were relatively cheap to get into (two year degrees, trade schooling, and so forth) that made a decent living, and even offered to help many of her students find jobs at places she had worked for, or with contacts she had made in the industry. It did seem, however, that it was always the teachers in STEM fields that gave this sort of advice, and at the high school I attended these weren't very popular classes short of the required minimum of basic chemistry, physics, and algebra. I think maybe that's how many of my friends say they never heard this advice, and it's kind of a shame (though I think a few of them are simply in denial).

But I have to admit, I'm always baffled when a friend reveals they have 100k in debt, a four year degree in Critical Analysis of Cinema, and could not foresee their inability to find work in their field.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2016, 11:02:11 PM by Justan Henner »

Offline Arry

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #431 on: February 25, 2016, 12:53:45 AM »

I wish someone had prepared me to find a major in highschool, which would have helped me choose the right college, which then would have put me on the path to a career. Maybe I am just blinded in my age, since its been a while since I was in school, but I don't recall a large effort going into preparing me for life outside of standardized testing.


Sorry to go back in topics a bit, but I thought I'd address this, because I had a fairly different experience.

It's possible that it's a phenomenon that began just as I got into high school, or perhaps its due to the culture in the area I attended school, but as someone who graduated college in 2013, I feel like this warning of "choose a profitable major" was one that was constantly spoken of, at least at the three schools I attended (high school, community college, and at my university, though less so at the university).

There was always that supposedly opposing theme of: "pursue your dreams, find a career you really love, don't settle for anything less!" and it was a pretty powerful theme, which seemed to envelope the majority of schooling, but I feel like that was more something you'd hear from liberal arts teachers, whereas the college/high school counselors were constantly suggesting that we find something worthy of the large investment. At my high school, the standard advice from the counselors was always "if you don't already know what you want to do with your life, go to community college instead of a 4 year. Don't spend the money unless you already have a plan."

I remember I had one teacher in high school that had worked in mechanical engineering most of her career, who was always giving us suggestions on related fields that were relatively cheap to get into (two year degrees, trade schooling, and so forth) that made a decent living, and even offered to help many of her students find jobs at places she had worked for, or with contacts she had made in the industry. It did seem, however, that it was always the teachers in STEM fields that gave this sort of advice, and at the high school I attended these weren't very popular classes short of the required minimum of basic chemistry, physics, and algebra. I think maybe that's how many of my friends say they never heard this advice, and it's kind of a shame (though I think a few of them are simply in denial).

But I have to admit, I'm always baffled when a friend reveals they have 100k in debt, a four year degree in Critical Analysis of Cinema, and could not foresee their inability to find work in their field.

My research was completely self driven,. I didn't have anyone in high school or college directing me. I am just kinda anal about certain things and was determined to become financially independent. Also, being a math and statistics geek at the time, yeah, it kinda made sense that I would look into the stats for the options. It is just pretty much how my brain likes to work.

This said, I would never advocate someone selecting a career based solely on "profitability". Yes, I did choose a major/career that has proven to be profitable, but it was something I new I was interested in and enjoyed. There were few things I hated more during my time in college than getting stuck on a group project with people you could tell chose the major based on how much money they thought they could make. They had no interest in the material, they had no aptitude for it. They really just kinda sucked at it. I still run across people like that in workforce, but it is not as bad as it was in college (I think some were weeded out before graduation, I think others were weeded out during layoffs).

What I do advocate is looking at things that you find interesting and then research what kind of career you can get in that field and what it takes to get there (and what percentage of graduates are able to find a job). And if there is truly nothing that has demand, look and see what kind of jobs you might be interested in that do have a demand.

I dunno. This is all so much easier for me to say given that I was interested in math and science and programming. When I graduated, the Engineering curriculum required pretty much zero English, foreign language, history, etc. etc. and as appalling as that might sound, at the time, I found it appealing because it meant that I could fill up on the classes I enjoyed. Hindsight, I think if I had better teachers for history, I should have enjoyed that more. I never disliked English, but when I was in college, I would much rather spend my time in a computer lab than writing a paper.

TL;DR I am a complete dork and always have been.
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Offline JMack

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #432 on: February 25, 2016, 01:41:42 AM »
I have been very lucky. I majored in Theater and English at a local state school that was inexpensive enough for my folks to cover the freight. (Both brothers were sucking up dollars and borrowing money for a very good liberal arts college. My dad was sooo happy I went state school.)

I learned I was a better director than actor.
Then I learned I was a better theater historian than director.
Still, I tried to do theater professionally after school. I did four months of dinner theater at night and children's theater in the day. Then the dinner theater realized I really couldn't dance (I could and can sing) and could not be taught.

So I learned I was a better business analyst than any of that.
And it's mostly fun.
And I can still do singing and theater and stuff on the side.
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Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #433 on: February 25, 2016, 03:59:01 AM »

This said, I would never advocate someone selecting a career based solely on "profitability". Yes, I did choose a major/career that has proven to be profitable, but it was something I new I was interested in and enjoyed. There were few things I hated more during my time in college than getting stuck on a group project with people you could tell chose the major based on how much money they thought they could make. They had no interest in the material, they had no aptitude for it. They really just kinda sucked at it. I still run across people like that in workforce, but it is not as bad as it was in college (I think some were weeded out before graduation, I think others were weeded out during layoffs).


No, me neither, however I will say, I always felt certain teachers put emphasis on it to the point of implying it was impossible to find a career that is both well paying and fulfilling. I also think there are just some skills that are a better time investment than a monetary one, especially given the availability of free education online. As someone with a degree in Mathematics, I will readily admit that a large portion of my understanding of the field comes from the internet, from places like Khan Academy and wikipedia, not from my professors. And, truth be told, for the major I studied in, my community college was a better school than the "top tier" university I attended, though I think that might've been different had I picked a major requiring a lab. Most of the transfer students I spoke to at the 4 year had the same opinion, though whether that is a problem with the university I attended, or a testament to the quality of California's community colleges, I couldn't tell you.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2016, 04:01:49 AM by Justan Henner »

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Politics and other ailments of the real world
« Reply #434 on: February 29, 2016, 06:57:04 PM »
spoiler to save folks who get riled up by ignorant people talking about politics from getting riled up.

Spoiler for Hiden:

myself, however, i find great entertainment in wading through the comment section in places like brietbart.  the stark ridiculousness of some americans is a downright wonder to behold.  i long ago gave up trying to convince strangers from harming themselves by voting against their self interest.  i've moved to "holding their beer while darwinism takes its course".

that being said, OMG!  this is my FAVORITE NEW THING!!
https://www.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/