July 15, 2020, 12:22:37 PM

Poll

Have you found that your E-reader has given you a richer experience?

Absolutely - My E-reader has opened new avenues to adventure that I would have missed otherwise.
Some what - I have been exposed to new writers, but its been a mixed bag
Neutral - Im only buying books I would have purchased in print so it has little impact other than price
No - I have made purchases I would never have made otherwise and regret.
I do not own an E-read

Author Topic: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not  (Read 9497 times)

Offline The Mad Hatter

Better get ready to own an ereader or tablet
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2011, 07:11:31 AM »

Because within five years book stores will be extinct like record stores. It's basic economics. I bought my first ebook the other night, Lazette Gifford's Kat Among the Pigeons. It cost me $1.99, which is a lot less than a paperback. My IPad now holds over twenty ebooks (I raided Project Gutenburg) and still only weighs 1.5 pounds. The battery life isn't as good as a Kindle (10-12 hours), but unlike a Kindle, I can use to it work on my novel.

And reading on the screen isn't hard. In fact I've had no problems at all.

So why would I ever buy another hard copy book again? Cheaper. More convenient (not only do the books not take up any space, but I did the shopping from my arm chair). The dog isn't going to eat the books (this was a puppy thing - he hasn't done it in over a year). Oh, and I can read in bed without having the light on, which means I don't keep my wife awake. Lots of advantages.

Let's face it folks, it's the near future. Hard copies books are an anachronism. Why do you think that Borders declared bankruptcy? They are but the first.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline nilling

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2011, 01:18:58 PM »
I have a hardcopy of this months book read and I think I still love to hold a book! ;) I think I will let price be the dictating factor when choosing the format ;)
“My reality is based on a head shot being a kill shot.”

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2011, 03:00:16 PM »
I have a hardcopy of this months book read and I think I still love to hold a book! ;) I think I will let price be the dictating factor when choosing the format ;)
You assume that you will have a choice. Economics dictate that you won't. Try to find a record store. You won't. They don't exist anymore. Compact Discs are a dying distribution mechanism for music, it's all going electronic.

The same thing is happening in books. Book stores are going away, as are hard copy books, and it will happen a lot quicker than the music store/compact disc change over happened, because the rate of change is accelerating.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline Shamrock

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2011, 05:42:49 AM »
I disagree with you completely. Remember not everyone in the world has an e-reader let alone a PC. In South Africa having a kindle or another e-reading device is the exception not the norm. Books will never die for the exact reason that not everyone who reads can afford to buy these devices, or has the means to buy them. In Nigeria especially they have a huge book market, because in Africa we have young women who are aspirational, so they read books but don't fit into the economic groups that can afford e-readers.
Another point most of the fiction read in South Africa is international so therefore publishing houses might have to decrease their print runs but I doubt very much if books will stop existing.
Books are the blessed chloroform of the mind

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2011, 05:31:15 PM »
I disagree with you completely. Remember not everyone in the world has an e-reader let alone a PC. In South Africa having a kindle or another e-reading device is the exception not the norm. Books will never die for the exact reason that not everyone who reads can afford to buy these devices, or has the means to buy them. In Nigeria especially they have a huge book market, because in Africa we have young women who are aspirational, so they read books but don't fit into the economic groups that can afford e-readers.
Another point most of the fiction read in South Africa is international so therefore publishing houses might have to decrease their print runs but I doubt very much if books will stop existing.
You make the assumption that prices will remain constant, where history teaches us  that prices will drop, and that within 2 years an equivalent to the original IPad will sell for $50.00 US, and an equivalent to the original Kindle for $5.00. At that point Nigeria won't be able to afford to print hard copy books, they will be too expensive.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline Minesril

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2011, 09:51:07 AM »
It is another subject, but yes, there are record stores, enough for me to have built a pretty good vinyl collection.  You just need to know where to look.  You can even get them brand new at the big London stores.

Borders declared bancruptcy because they were trying to compete with Amazon, and it didn't work.  Whenever they released a new hardback they would sell it at half price, and if you know your book margins which I do, you know they were making a tiny profit, if any at all.  THAT is why bookstores are closing down - it's Amazon, not the e-reader.

People will always want the actual book.  People will always want to actually come into a bookstore, browse, even ask the really rather knowledgable staff for recommendations.  I know that Amazon has the 'you might like this' option, but most of the time it's a link to something completely different.  A kid asks me for something like Harry Potter, I can give a better answer than a website can.  I've read the book, for one thing.

Us booksellers are going nowhere.  Or so I have to tell myself, because the alternative is just too grim to contemplate.

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2011, 12:23:22 PM »
It is another subject, but yes, there are record stores, enough for me to have built a pretty good vinyl collection.  You just need to know where to look.  You can even get them brand new at the big London stores.

Borders declared bancruptcy because they were trying to compete with Amazon, and it didn't work.  Whenever they released a new hardback they would sell it at half price, and if you know your book margins which I do, you know they were making a tiny profit, if any at all.  THAT is why bookstores are closing down - it's Amazon, not the e-reader.

People will always want the actual book.  People will always want to actually come into a bookstore, browse, even ask the really rather knowledgable staff for recommendations.  I know that Amazon has the 'you might like this' option, but most of the time it's a link to something completely different.  A kid asks me for something like Harry Potter, I can give a better answer than a website can.  I've read the book, for one thing.

Us booksellers are going nowhere.  Or so I have to tell myself, because the alternative is just too grim to contemplate.
I haven't seen a record store in years. Oh, we have a chain called HMV, which supposedly is a music store - but mostly carries DVDs. I get my British DVDs there, it's got a far better British selection than any other place I've found.

And yes, there probably will be some market for real, actual, books, just as there is some market for vinyl. But my guess is that it will be a small, specialist market.

As to recommendations, that function is slowly being taken on by websites like Fantasy Faction, Goodreads, and other community based reading sites. No one takes Amazon's recommendations seriously. Not even Amazon.

I'm not being nasty in saying that I think book stores are on the way out. I'm a futurist (I write Science Fiction as well as Technology and Science Articles) and I'm making a prediction based on the technologies I see, and trends that I see. When you put together all of these broad based trends, which include:

  • The Move to Mobile Computing
  • The further drop in costs of mobile computing
  • The death of Windows (and Microsoft)
  • The replacement of Intel Chips by ARM Chips
  • The further drop in Flash Memory Pricing
  • The further drop in touch screen display unit pricing
  • Further advances in battery technology
  • Software advances
  • Wifi Radio advances

My estimate is that we should see devices relatively equivalent to the original IPad on the market for about $50.00 dollars in about 3 years, and devices relatively equivalent to the current Kindle selling for about $5.00.

With prices like that, just about everyone in North America, Europe, Japan, Korea, & Russia, will be able to afford to own one, down to the kids. In many parts of the rest of the world they'll be affordable too. But paperbacks will still cost $10.00. The economics of the situation will force a move to Ebooks. In fact with the price of the original IPad equivalent being so low, and it having the capabilities of a laptop computer (I know - I have an original IPad, and I use it as a laptop), it would make sense for governments to standardize on it as an instructional tool for schools, as a replacement for the One Laptop Per Child Project.

This of course assumes that I'm right. I think that I am. Logic says that I am, but you know what logic is.

A means of going wrong with confidence.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline DracoFidus

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2011, 12:33:46 PM »

  • The death of Windows (and Microsoft)


What? I see over 40 computers per day and in nearly 4 years I havent seen a computer that isnt Microsoft (except in the apple store - but thats to be expected)
I Trust You Will Do Me Proud - Uther Pendragon (BBC Merlin)
Youtube - http://www.youtube.com/user/MontHulmeProductions?feature=mhum

Offline Minesril

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2011, 02:30:57 PM »
It's a scary, scary vision of the future.  Rather like the human race in Wall*e: nobody going out to the shops, or work, because everything can be done with some electrical device.  I would prefer to stop that from happening, which is why I hardly ever internet shop (unless I genuinely can't find something in the shops).  Being told I buy stuff all from the comfort of my sofa actually makes me shudder.  But, hey, some people like that, and I am not one to judge.

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2011, 10:18:43 PM »

  • The death of Windows (and Microsoft)


What? I see over 40 computers per day and in nearly 4 years I havent seen a computer that isnt Microsoft (except in the apple store - but thats to be expected)

I've crunched the numbers. If you feel like going through them go to my website and do a search on the term 'Microsoft Death Watch', because it really is off-topic for this board. But that's the result I'm getting, and I'm pretty good at this sort of thing.

Of course this assumes that Microsoft is too stupid to see the problems. I know that they aren't that stupid. Problem is, that I can't see any evidence that they are taking any action...

Which is the root of another article :)

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline Tiffany Kysis Tackett

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2011, 11:36:33 PM »
There are two record stores just down the street from where I live, and they do very well.  They also have a small section with cassettes.  And two used book stores which only handle used books (one of which accepts cash only!) just down the street from them.

Hell, me and a few of my friends use typewriters to get rough drafts of our current WIPs done, I still have a G1 phone, and my boyfriend still has a record player, that we lovingly use. *shrugs*  I don't think old technology will die out all together.  In fact, there is too much nostalgia attached to it for people to let them just fade away into the past.

While e-books are a nifty alternative for some people, like those who read a lot on the go, or need to enlarge the font for sight reasons, it is great.  HOWEVER, I love having a physical book on my hands and I will continue to buy books.

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #26 on: March 20, 2011, 01:11:49 AM »
It's a scary, scary vision of the future.  Rather like the human race in Wall*e: nobody going out to the shops, or work, because everything can be done with some electrical device.  I would prefer to stop that from happening, which is why I hardly ever internet shop (unless I genuinely can't find something in the shops).  Being told I buy stuff all from the comfort of my sofa actually makes me shudder.  But, hey, some people like that, and I am not one to judge.

Don't you mean the human race in Isaac Asimov's Robot/Spacer novels from the 50's? That has some huge advantages to a semi-invalid like myself who rarely leaves the house.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline Minesril

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2011, 08:56:02 AM »
It's a scary, scary vision of the future.  Rather like the human race in Wall*e: nobody going out to the shops, or work, because everything can be done with some electrical device.  I would prefer to stop that from happening, which is why I hardly ever internet shop (unless I genuinely can't find something in the shops).  Being told I buy stuff all from the comfort of my sofa actually makes me shudder.  But, hey, some people like that, and I am not one to judge.

Don't you mean the human race in Isaac Asimov's Robot/Spacer novels from the 50's? That has some huge advantages to a semi-invalid like myself who rarely leaves the house.

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter



I didn't know that, and I apologise for the insensitivity of my post.

Offline The Mad Hatter

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2011, 11:36:38 PM »

I didn't know that, and I apologise for the insensitivity of my post.

Since I wasn't offended, it wasn't insensitive.

But I do think that we are going to see a far more rapid move towards eReaders than we did to MP3 players. The economics are just too compelling, and there are already a lot of books only being released in electronic format. Compact Discs cost about $15.00, and with individual songs priced at $0.99, that only dropped album prices to about $10.00. Ebooks on the other hand are often priced at $2.99 as compared to $12.99 for paperbacks, and $30.00 for hardcover!

And of course computer usage is widespread in the English speaking world, and most eReader software can run on the more common computer operating systems as well, so it's not just the Kindle/Kobo/IPad hardware platforms that are useful. Never mind mobile phones...

Wayne aka The Mad Hatter

Offline Ninevah

Re: E-readers - Enriching your reader experience.. or not
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2011, 05:19:17 AM »
My wife bought me a Nook for Christmas last year and I've used it every day since.  We're at the point right now where we own too many books, and have no more shelf space.  It sucks, because I love the artwork. . .the feel. . . as a graphic designer, I'm even interested in the typefaces they're printed with.  It's just the sad fact that if we get new books, some of the old ones have to go away.

I hope at some point ebooks will be sold on author's websites like some music is now, so I KNOW my money is going directly into their hands and not Amazon or B&N or wherever.

I'm a huge thrift shopper, and still bring home used books from time to time. . . but I don't feel I can just run out and buy everything brand new from the bookshop like I used to.