December 08, 2019, 11:20:55 AM

Author Topic: Domestic Issues  (Read 18376 times)

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2017, 10:31:10 AM »
Henry you're a genius...
I'm not sure we have the same quality standards at second hand stores where I live, however

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2017, 05:31:17 PM »
Lady Ty, I tried it.
One wash at 90 C with vinegar, then a wash right away with bicarbonate of soda at 90 C, then drying it with the wind coming through open floor-to-ceiling doors.

It did not work, they look and feel exactly the same as before >:( >:(
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Offline Lady Ty

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2017, 12:42:47 AM »
I actually did that the other way round, bicarb in wash, white vinegar in rinse. Then line dry and finish off in dryer. Can only say it was noticeable difference for me, but not massive. Maybe go back to normal wash with softener in rinse, but use the bicarb/vinegar every 4 or 5 washes to clear the residue. Thats all I can suggest.
TBH, I like Bradley's second last  suggestion best, that is sure to work. But prison towels will be really, really rough. :-\
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2017, 11:38:16 AM »
Any tips for viewing houses?
 :)
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Offline Hedin

Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2017, 01:29:38 PM »
When we bought our current house we spent a lot of time on realtor apps looking around the area we wanted within our price range to get a sense of what was available and what we liked and didn't like.  From there we figured out what features we really wanted and what we were willing to compromise on.  After that just go looking.  We did three sessions and probably looked at 20 houses total when we got ours (it was one of the first ones in the third session that we looked at).  When we looked at the house we have now it wasn't an angels shining down from heaven moment but at the same time just looking around it felt right for us.  Just have patience, our realtor said most people look at around 20 houses but she had some fall in love with the first house they looked at and others it look 30-40 houses.

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2017, 03:10:50 PM »
Find a room you can turn into a personal library.
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2017, 03:14:40 PM »
it wasn't an angels shining down from heaven moment but at the same time just looking around it felt right for us.
Thanks, I think this will be key.

Find a room you can turn into a personal library.
Oh, I so want this, yes ;D
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Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2017, 06:02:21 PM »
I'm sort of an expert at that. Here's my list of things to consider:

Features: No idea what you like, but I always start with:
1. Location. Seek a home with multiple routes to most of the areas where you go. In the UK, proximity to bus/tube would be key I think. I have had good experience getting into a balanced zone where multiple routes are within 2 minutes, even though that means nothing is super-close. This allows freedom to avoid construction, accidents, etc. over time.
2. Stairs. I avoid 'em. Unless there's a lift.
3. Look past cosmetics, which you can change easily, to things you can't change: space, cabinetry/storage, etc. If you're a homebody, light and spaces are key. Some like many small rooms. Others, like me, prefer fewer but larger rooms.
4. Separation. If you live alone, might not be an issue, but I like rooms that are separate (3 kids will do that :) )
5. Economy. I have always bought homes that had cosmetic failings - because I knew they drove down the price, and I could fix those cheaply and easily over time - more value over time. Most don't look that far ahead.

This stuff is about quality of home, not features:
1. Note the things that aren't there. I bought a house once that had no hall closet for coats. We didn't notice because that's not a major thing that jumps up.
2. Look at heat and air - turn em on and see how they run!
3. Look for signs of leaks/plumbing problems along base of walls, around plumbing, joints of floor/ceiling. Bubbling paint and small patches of fresh paint, mold, etc., indicate potential issues.
4. Be thorough. Open all closets, cabinets, dishwasher, etc. Run appliances - disposal, dishwasher, etc., to be sure they work.
5. Look at fuse box for signs of shorts - charring, etc.
6. Check gutters to ensure they're hooked up. Look for signs of water pooling outside. It should flow away. Pooling means gutters/drains clogged or not hooked up.
7. Check door and window locks to ensure they work.
8. Check stairway carpets to ensure they're properly affixed to stairs and aren't going to get loose and trip your visitors ;) Check seams between pieces of carpet, usually at the border of rooms to ensure they're properly affixed to the floor.
9. Safety. Make sure stairs have no loose boards, balconies, railings, etc. sound. Test smoke and fire alarms. Look at the building (if in a large one) fire records and elevator maintenance records. In the US these must be available. If dated in the 80s, move on :)

If you are using an agent - tell them your dad is the most anal reterntive man in the world and he's looking at everything in excruciating detail before you commit - they won't want to waste their time and will skip the places they know damned well suck and have problems.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 06:06:05 PM by The Gem Cutter »
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Offline Arry

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #23 on: July 26, 2017, 06:18:30 PM »
I'd vote for hiring an inspector to find all the quality issues. :) They are trained to know what to look for and usually know of things to check you might not think of.

Good luck and have fun! :) House hunting is fun and stressful at the same time.
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2017, 07:07:27 PM »
Thanks, those are mostly good ideas (some not applicable and others are for the second viewing).

Arry, definitely, and here in the UK we always have to have a basic survey anyway, but I'll do a more detailed one.

Summary of day 1:
Place 1 --> potential, but kinda indiferent
Place 2 --> nope, not for me

General rethorical question/surprises:
* I thought all houses would have a place for a dishwasher, especially if you've redone the kitchen relatively recently
* Why must one of the bedrooms always be. so. damn. small??
 ::)
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Offline Hedin

Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2017, 01:13:35 AM »
Oh looking at houses brings out the inner architect in me. I was constantly wondering why they did something a certain way when it was obvious to me that another way was clearly better. I'm sure most of the answers were due to water/electrical/air/etc considerations but at the same time I felt like I could have found a better solution.

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2017, 10:11:08 AM »
Here's my list:

1) can I afford it?
2) is it close to work?
3) is it close to gym and groceries?
4) are there cockroaches?

Consequently I live in a closet with half a range and no oven and a shower that barely fits one person, but hey it works.  And there's not *too* many cockroaches.

I need to win the lottery so I can one day live in places like you guys...

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2017, 10:40:55 AM »
^ Bradley ;D

Oh looking at houses brings out the inner architect in me. I was constantly wondering why they did something a certain way when it was obvious to me that another way was clearly better. I'm sure most of the answers were due to water/electrical/air/etc considerations but at the same time I felt like I could have found a better solution.
Same here. Inner architect and inner interior decorator too, hehe, although I *can* do something with the latter.
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Offline m3mnoch

Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2017, 03:24:46 PM »
funny.  we're actually house-hunting too, bea!

so, we started looking because our boys are just getting too big and noisy for the place we're in right now.  it's got a tiny yard, so any running and chasing they do consists of in-the-house-out-of-the-house-in-the-house-out-of-the-house.  and the inside is very open-shared-space, so when our tween-to-teen boys are yelling back and forth playing video games or whatever, it's *really* loud and obnoxious.

anyway, the point is, based on our current family status, we're looking for specific features.  we've even prioritized them:

1) divided living space.  basically a game room or something where we can shut the door and let them play.  preferably close to their rooms.  in our current house, our option is to convert our open loft that's right above the living/kitchen area into a noisy central place.

2) a large yard.  when they're not in their in their inside entertainment area, we can punt them outdoors.

3) a guest room.  we get half a dozen visitors a year who come stay with us.  we don't really want them sleeping on the couch.

4) a great kitchen.  we spend most of our waking hours in and around the kitchen.

5) a good investment.  we're nixing houses we see in neighborhoods where we won't be able to at least recoup the money for any improvements we make on the house.  ideally, it'd be a place with room to rise 20% in value over the next 10 years.

so, yeah.  as you can imagine, it's hard to find a place in san diego that meets all our requirements, but is still priced within our budget.  we've visited dozens of properties and browsed hundreds more on the internet.  out of those, we've found 2.  and in both of which, we were out-bid by some bastard throwing more money at the owners.

the overall theme we're finding is if we buy a cheaper place and drop a ton of money in renovations, we price ourselves out of the neighborhood and it's a crappy investment.  if we find a perfect place that needs hardly any work, we don't have the money to win a bidding war.  that leaves us with the option of buying an expensive place nobody wants in a nice neighborhood everyone wants, and figuring out where to find the cash for a remodel to make it a house *we* want.

oh, and since nobody wants a buyer with a contingency on selling their house first (that's how we lost out on the bidding war for the first house), we've had to sell our house first to get the money to buy a new one.  so, long story short, we're in escrow right now and are going to be "homeless" after we close next week.  (imagine us, with the requirements above, living in a two-bedroom apartment . . . yay.)

so, my advice bea:
- make a list of the features you want based on what fits within your life.  (near a park, an extra room for a library, a guest room for visitors, etc.)
- look in a price range you can afford, or cheaper so you still have a renovation budget. 
- keep looking until you find one, but don't fall in love with it.  bid on it, expect to be outbid, then repeat if you are. 
- don't compromise on the features you want, but be super-flexible in every other aspect.

Offline Hedin

Re: Domestic Issues
« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2017, 04:31:33 PM »
oh, and since nobody wants a buyer with a contingency on selling their house first (that's how we lost out on the bidding war for the first house), we've had to sell our house first to get the money to buy a new one.  so, long story short, we're in escrow right now and are going to be "homeless" after we close next week.  (imagine us, with the requirements above, living in a two-bedroom apartment . . . yay.)

We probably ended up in our current house because of contingency issues.  Saw one we really liked, smaller bedrooms and living spaces than we have now but it had the perfect basement (we don't have a basement), square footage was about the same just in different areas.  We wanted to put an offer in but the seller wouldn't do a contingency. A few days later we accepted an offer on our house and reached back to the first house and they were in a multiple offer situation and we would probably have to go to the top of our set budget (which was lower than what we were approved for) to get it.  We went out looking that day to see a few more houses before deciding what to do about the other house and saw the house we're in now.  If the first house had accepted the contingency or we had sold our house just a couple days sooner (and ours was only on the market for 10 days) we would probably be in that other house.