December 18, 2018, 03:29:30 PM

Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 57788 times)

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #645 on: November 19, 2018, 04:33:35 AM »
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.
No, underpants are under pantaloons.

Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #646 on: November 22, 2018, 09:31:08 PM »
Some British people say pants for trousers.
Never heard anyone other than Americans call trousers, pants.

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #647 on: November 22, 2018, 10:14:45 PM »
Some British people say pants for trousers.
Never heard anyone other than Americans call trousers, pants.
I have, although I can't remember where or when. It's been a while since I've lived in the UK. I've also heard people say truck for lorry.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2018, 11:04:36 PM by NedMarcus »

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #648 on: November 22, 2018, 11:05:51 PM »
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6759
  • Total likes: 4599
  • Gender: Male
  • ridiculously obscure is my super power.
    • View Profile
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #649 on: December 01, 2018, 01:01:16 AM »
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

Pretty much never.
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #650 on: December 01, 2018, 09:58:04 AM »
American is taking over...
I saw the local supermarket advertise an offer on 'Chips'. They are CRISPS. Even says so on the packet.
Chips are the deep fat fried chips of potato.
"French Fries" are the fake too skinny chips sold in Fast Food Franchises, usually controlled by parasitic international companies. Franchise means the owner puts up all the money, pays the rent but is only a "minder". The Franchise dictates suppliers, menu, style, everything. Some leading french fries have a special coating to encourage eating and drinking more. Real chips have no coating.
I'm in Ireland. More people use Polish and Chinese than Irish. We mostly use 'British English' but with big variations between Belfast (in UK), Derry (in UK also called Slash City Derry/Londonderry)) Dublin (Ireland but nicknamed Western Britain), Cork, Limerick and Galway. That's the five biggest cities on the Island. Rural Kerry, Donegal, Clare, Wexford etc very different.

It's very evident on the UK & Irish Media, aided by Netflix (a loss making parasite), US TV, US Cinema and (anti-) Social Media is rapidly becoming American in spelling, vocabulary and style.
Perhaps in 25 years all English speakers will only be using American.

The Evil of American Format Dates:
My Computer has a creeping Americanization, the Email program is displaying all dates in the foolish MM DD YYYY format. ISO YYYY MM DD is best for sorting. Non-American format is DD MM YYYY, a logical ascending format.

Recipes on the Internet (Food or Wool) and stupid cups
Is it American or British Imperial?  What size is a cup! The standard UK imperial measure* is hardly used now and doesn't apply to ANYTHING other than baking. There seems to be various US standard "cups" for various purposes. Also a Japanese one.
Also don't Americans have weighing scales for Yarn or non-liquid ingredients? We have had cheap dial type since 1950s with grams and also UK pounds & ounces. For nearly 20 years the digital ones have been cheap and have a button for grams and also UK pounds & ounces, also to zero out weight of empty bowl.

* In the United Kingdom the standard cup was set at 10 imperial fluid ounces, or half an imperial pint. The cup was rarely used in practice, as historically most kitchens tended to be equipped with scales and ingredients were measured by weight, rather than volume.  (There are also UK teaspoons = 5ml, UK tablespoon = 15ml).
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(unit) and also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measuring_spoon to see why it's SO STUPID to post recipes on the Internet using cups,  tablespoons or teaspoons. Non-liquid should NEVER use cups, tablespoons or teaspoons.

Offline J.R. Darewood

  • aka Duckly Breadgood
  • Writing Group
  • Master Namer
  • ******
  • Posts: 2141
  • Total likes: 1240
  • Gender: Male
  • Zork. And it was all downhill from there.
    • View Profile
    • Nerd Empire
Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #651 on: December 02, 2018, 05:23:02 AM »
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

@NedMarcus It's typically used when speaking to children.

Eg.  "Dinner is ready.  Turn off fortnite and come eat."  @Lady Ty  is actually an expert at this particular usage.

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #652 on: December 02, 2018, 07:43:43 AM »
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

@NedMarcus It's typically used when speaking to children.

Eg.  "Dinner is ready.  Turn off fortnite and come eat."  @Lady Ty  is actually an expert at this particular usage.
I actually have no idea what you've just said  ???