December 18, 2018, 03:30:40 PM

Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 57790 times)

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #630 on: November 09, 2018, 08:55:40 AM »

 ???

Wait how do you fit pants underneath your pants? Aren't trousers underwear anyway? This is why I can never follow when English people speak to each other...

Offline JMack

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #631 on: November 09, 2018, 10:57:44 AM »
British people don't have pants???
Our pants are worn under trousers ;D
Not to mention unmentionables.  8)
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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #632 on: November 09, 2018, 12:43:26 PM »
Quote
Wait how do you fit pants underneath your pants? Aren't trousers underwear anyway? This is why I can never follow when English people speak to each other...

Ah my friend let me assist in your linguistic dilemma. America is well known for it's crimes against grammar and its misconceptions of the English language. Let me assure you that no gentleman is seen in his pants in public. pants being underwear. Underwear is worn next to the skin and is not displayed publicly. What you mistakenly call pants are actually trousers and are described as 'a pair of' like socks and shoes.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 02:21:05 PM by Rostum »

Offline DrNefario

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #633 on: November 09, 2018, 01:19:32 PM »
I kind of feel that US-English is more in the right on this one.

In British English, pants is an abbreviation of underpants, but surely the name underpants implies that they* are garments that go under pants?


*And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.

Online ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #634 on: November 09, 2018, 01:51:10 PM »
*And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.
Although the people "in fashion" use singular: "that's such a lovely shoe", "you need a trouser to go with that" ::)

(yes, I watch Project Runway...)

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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #635 on: November 09, 2018, 04:36:17 PM »
Quote
In British English, pants is an abbreviation of underpants, but surely the name underpants implies that they* are garments that go under pants?

British English! Gods damn you sir there is only the Queens English anything else is a foul invention of Microsoft. If you choose to wear such outmoded garments as pantaloons that is your choice, but do not expect anyone to take you seriously.

Offline Elfy

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #636 on: November 10, 2018, 12:37:25 AM »
Down here pants are the outside garment, as are trousers or strides. Underpants are undies or underdaks, not to be confused with trakkies or trakky daks, which are what I think Americans refer to as sweatpants.

Offline Justan Henner

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #637 on: November 12, 2018, 06:38:27 PM »
trakky daks

 ;D

Australian is the best English.

Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #638 on: November 17, 2018, 09:58:15 PM »
And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.
Originally leg coverings where not sewn together at the front and back of the bum/torso. Hose (for men or women) were separate legs, often footless and hung from the waist over the top of the smalls.
In some periods of time the sleeves also might not be stitched into the body garment (bodice, dress, blouse, shirt etc) but lace on.
A "dress" or "gown" wasn't originally a one piece female garment that was modest enough to be worn on it's own, but part of a description of many items of clothing. "Gown" seems to have been any kind of full length garment, as survives in Ballgown, dressing gown and hospital gown.
A "dressing gown" seems a strange name compared to a "night gown" (rare on men now).

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #639 on: November 18, 2018, 01:02:34 AM »
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #640 on: November 18, 2018, 12:10:36 PM »
If anyone from the UK refers to pants it will be an abbreviation of underpants or they are talking to an American and ensuring there is no confusion brought about by the forked use of English in this matter. If you have read English authors using Americanisms it is because English is translated across the pond (one way only) as Americans are apparently put off by English terms. Ben Aaronovitch  has a blog post about this covering dominant language theory.

Offline Elfy

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #641 on: November 18, 2018, 08:40:29 PM »
If anyone from the UK refers to pants it will be an abbreviation of underpants or they are talking to an American and ensuring there is no confusion brought about by the forked use of English in this matter. If you have read English authors using Americanisms it is because English is translated across the pond (one way only) as Americans are apparently put off by English terms. Ben Aaronovitch  has a blog post about this covering dominant language theory.
Was the Aaronovitch article brought about by the US editions of the Peter Grant books changing football to soccer?
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #642 on: November 19, 2018, 12:19:16 AM »
Quote
Was the Aaronovitch article brought about by the US editions of the Peter Grant books changing football to soccer?

yes it was and titled something like Lesley plays soccer on the sidewalk and it is buried deep in the Temporarily Significant blog.

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #643 on: November 19, 2018, 01:56:36 AM »
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.

Offline Elfy

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #644 on: November 19, 2018, 04:15:40 AM »
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.
Just call them daks and you'll be okay. Don't call them underdaks, though. I think the Scots use the word trousers for underpants, it seems that way from the song 'Donald, Where's Your Trousers?' by Andy Stewart.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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