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Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 70630 times)

Offline Hedin

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2015, 09:25:14 PM »
Can you get marmite?

You can, don't think it's very popular though.

Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2015, 09:30:43 PM »
Marmite is banned for sale in Denmark as the salt content is too high.

Offline night_wrtr

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2015, 01:11:57 AM »
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing



And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!

That image. I have no words. That is a combo I would never have imagined.

Beanie weenies on the other hand:

Offline JMack

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #33 on: November 09, 2015, 01:28:33 AM »
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing



And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!

That image. I have no words. That is a combo I would never have imagined.

Beanie weenies on the other hand:


In our family, "beanie weenies" was called "Penny Soup".  :D
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Offline Elfy

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #34 on: November 09, 2015, 04:26:18 AM »
And for some reason Americans like to combine peanut butter with jam, which just seems so wrong to me.

I have never heard of that, add another thing to the sounds disgusting list.

Your jelly is our jello.

Fish fingers are the same.

Candy corn is super prevalent during Halloween but I don't know anyone who actually likes it.
It used to always make me wonder when I was a kid and watching US sitcoms and hearing references to peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I only knew about our jelly and wondered how it didn't melt.
Don't try asking Americans about what they call a biscuit, either.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Eclipse

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2015, 12:17:06 PM »
Hands up for cheese on toast
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2015, 12:23:39 PM »
Hands up for cheese on toast
Isn't that a toasted cheese sandwich?
I prefer cheese and ham when toasted, just cheese if it's a plain sandwich.
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Offline ultamentkiller

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2015, 12:37:43 PM »
Hands up for cheese on toast
Hell yes! I'll never eat normal toast. It must be cheese toast!

Offline JMack

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #38 on: November 09, 2015, 12:52:13 PM »
Are we talking about "grilled cheese"?
You put a cheese slice or two between two pieces of bread, maybe add bacon or ham, butter the outside of each slice and grill on both sides till golden brown and the cheese is all melty.
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #39 on: November 09, 2015, 12:59:55 PM »
I call that a 'toastie'.
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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #40 on: November 09, 2015, 03:34:31 PM »
Welsh rarebit. Heard of that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit

Cheese on toast

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese_on_toast

Of course what you call cheese horrifies Europeans. In the words of Tom Lehrer "It's amazing what they can do with plastics these days"
« Last Edit: November 09, 2015, 03:39:31 PM by Rostum »

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #41 on: November 09, 2015, 03:48:52 PM »
Welsh rarebit. Heard of that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit
For many years I always read that as "welsh rare-rabbit", and thought it was a main meal with, well, rabbit.
When I finally discovered what it was, I went 'duh!' :-[
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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #42 on: November 09, 2015, 04:10:39 PM »
AKA Welsh-Rabbit but never come across Welsh-Rare-Rabbit before.

At the end of thew day it's just fondue without the fondue set.

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2015, 04:21:32 PM »
you guys are killing me.  i just wrote "humour".  like, with a 'u'.

/sigh

Offline Hedin

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2015, 04:22:29 PM »
I am happy to report that I can still spell favorite correctly.