Fantasy Faction

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Eclipse on November 07, 2015, 10:10:49 PM

Title: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 07, 2015, 10:10:49 PM
http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/%28dec-2013%29-angelmaker/ask-a-brit-what-this-means!/

http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/general-discussion/baked-beans-who-lovehates-them-here/msg75411/#msg75411

I start one for the Americans

What is a bow-head?(seen this from an American author) and why do you never have beans on toast  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 07, 2015, 10:17:13 PM
Oh yummy beans on toast :D :D

(thanks Eclipse!)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 08:21:56 AM
Do you have Hobnobs and dunk it in your coffee or is that a British thing?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 08, 2015, 01:08:00 PM
Do you have Hobnobs and dunk it in your coffee or is that a British thing?

Discussions do not belong dunked in my coffee.  :P
Beans do not belong on my breakfast plate.  :P

You Portuguese ex-pats Brits........
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 01:11:18 PM
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/baked-beans-toast-1895291.jpg)

And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 08, 2015, 01:46:33 PM
Their beans are mixed with molasses and bit sweet for our tastes.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 08, 2015, 02:16:31 PM
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/baked-beans-toast-1895291.jpg)

And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!

That looks disgusting.

I gave never heard bow-head before so I have no clue on that one.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on November 08, 2015, 02:37:28 PM
That looks disgusting.
Knowing you, a picture with broccoli, parsnips or spinach may have gotten the same response. ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on November 08, 2015, 03:50:36 PM
http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/%28dec-2013%29-angelmaker/ask-a-brit-what-this-means!/

http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/general-discussion/baked-beans-who-lovehates-them-here/msg75411/#msg75411

I start one for the Americans

What is a bow-head? (seen this from an American author)
I had to google it, so not sure how popular it is. Or quite possibly, I am just too old. Having seen the definition, I completely get it, though.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bow+head
Quote
woman who wears a bow in her hair, who often has an annoyingly perky personality and may be overly intersted in things like her sorority
Buffy is such a bow head that she gave up her scholarship to marry and join the junior league.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on November 08, 2015, 04:30:42 PM
I feel strange asking this but... What are hobnobs?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 04:49:16 PM
I feel strange asking this but... What are hobnobs?
Don't, hehe - they're yummy oat biscuits :D
I normally buy the supermarket brand of oaty biscuits, they taste the same ;)

(http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/multimedia/archive/00045/table_hobnobs_736267_45393c.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on November 08, 2015, 05:03:56 PM
Oat biscuits? Are those like... Normal biscuits?
I've honestly never had oats before. Well, I had oatmeal, and gross. I thought those were meant for horses.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 08, 2015, 05:19:53 PM
That looks disgusting.
Knowing you, a picture with broccoli, parsnips or spinach may have gotten the same response. ;)

The only things that should be on toast are butter, peanut butter, or jam/jelly.

I do like black and pinto beans but I don't think those would be any better.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 05:29:05 PM
Oat biscuits? Are those like... Normal biscuits?
I've honestly never had oats before. Well, I had oatmeal, and gross. I thought those were meant for horses.
I think they're normal hehe, but then again there are LOTS of different types of biscuits here: I alternate buying rich tea, digestives (with or without chocolate) and oaty :D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 05:36:17 PM
Jelly on Toast are you completely mad? or is jelly something else in the US?

@Jmack (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=37094) you should always dip your hobnob first thing in the morning  ;D


two more questions

What are Bangs?

What do you call fish fingers?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 05:38:36 PM
Jelly on Toast are you completely mad? or is jelly something else in the US?
I think jelly is the same as jam.
It's not like our jelly dessert that we eat with a spoon.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 05:53:44 PM
Jelly on Toast are you completely mad? or is jelly something else in the US?
I think jelly is the same as jam.
It's not like our jelly dessert that we eat with a spoon.

I would like to see them eat our jelly on their toast
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 08, 2015, 06:06:05 PM
*boggle*

you're right.  the world, bea, is indeed a large and weird place.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 06:08:09 PM
*boggle*

you're right.  the world, bea, is indeed a large and weird place.

Just America  ;) only teasing
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 06:11:34 PM
In Veterans Day do you wear a flower in remembrance like we do with a poppy for Remembrance Day?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 08, 2015, 07:14:17 PM
Quote
In Veterans Day do you wear a flower in remembrance like we do with a poppy for Remembrance Day?

IIRC The Americans started the wearing the poppy and we adopted it.

Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD a Canadian wrote the poem that probably inspired it to happen.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 07:17:09 PM
Ty Rostum,that's awesome
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 08, 2015, 08:09:12 PM
Jelly on Toast are you completely mad? or is jelly something else in the US?

@Jmack (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=37094) you should always dip your hobnob first thing in the morning  ;D


two more questions

What are Bangs?

What do you call fish fingers?

Jelly and jam are pretty much the same thing (there may be a difference that I'm not aware of).

(https://etutor-images-common.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/www-pictures-thumbnails/w99x5c8ugvaj.jpg)

Bangs are the front portion of your hair that covers your forehead if long enough.

Fish fingers are typically fried slivers of fish, usually cod.

Quote
In Veterans Day do you wear a flower in remembrance like we do with a poppy for Remembrance Day?

IIRC The Americans started the wearing the poppy and we adopted it.

I'm not sure we started the poppy, if we did then it was something that went away by the time I became aware of things.   The first awareness of the poppy was when I watched English soccer matches.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 08, 2015, 08:28:01 PM
They did a great thing with the poppies out the front of the Tower of London last year. They 'planted' a forest of ceramic poppies out the front, and it looked like a sea of them just spilling out the gate. It was in remembrance of the 100 year anniversary of WW I.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 08:50:19 PM
Hedin, in British this is jam:
(http://certo.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/strawberry-freezer-jam.jpg)

and this is jelly:
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/08/27/article-2402671-1B78ABE0000005DC-201_634x455.jpg)

These are fish fingers:
(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01940/finger_1940341i.jpg?w=620)

And what you call "bangs" we call "fringe" ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 08, 2015, 08:54:59 PM
And for some reason Americans like to combine peanut butter with jam, which just seems so wrong to me.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 08, 2015, 08:57:24 PM
And for some reason Americans like to combine peanut butter with jam, which just seems so wrong to me.
Really?
yuck!
I mean, peanut butter is already yucky, hehe (let's keep the peanuts and butter separate, please: peanuts can go into M&Ms, though), but add jam on top? :o

By the way, americans have got candy corn, which tastes pure sugar and you can never have just one, but after a while you wonder why you started (I splurge, thanks to my american boss who brings it over at halloween hehe - not enough this year, I never got to eat a pumpkin one >:()
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 08, 2015, 09:00:52 PM
Jam is made with fruit, Jelly is made with juice of the fruit.

I cannot find my photos of the poppies at the tower. it was gobsmacking though. Nearly 900,000 of them.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=poppies+at+the+tower&iax=1&ia=images (https://duckduckgo.com/?q=poppies+at+the+tower&iax=1&ia=images)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 08, 2015, 09:01:58 PM
And for some reason Americans like to combine peanut butter with jam, which just seems so wrong to me.

I have never heard of that, add another thing to the sounds disgusting list.

Your jelly is our jello.

Fish fingers are the same.

Candy corn is super prevalent during Halloween but I don't know anyone who actually likes it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 08, 2015, 09:06:40 PM
Can you get marmite?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 08, 2015, 09:25:14 PM
Can you get marmite?

You can, don't think it's very popular though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 08, 2015, 09:30:43 PM
Marmite is banned for sale in Denmark as the salt content is too high.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 09, 2015, 01:11:57 AM
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/baked-beans-toast-1895291.jpg)

And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!

That image. I have no words. That is a combo I would never have imagined.

Beanie weenies on the other hand:
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_gVe56iUjJEg/TEGm242-3PI/AAAAAAAAKkw/rnwvt9TTYcg/s1600/011.JPG)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 09, 2015, 01:28:33 AM
Breakfast??
I don't have beans on toast for breakfast (the only cooked breakfast I can stomach are scrambled eggs, when on holidays...) - baked beans on toast are a weekend dinner thing

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/baked-beans-toast-1895291.jpg)

And FYI, biscuits don't get dunked in coffee. But on tea... yum!

That image. I have no words. That is a combo I would never have imagined.

Beanie weenies on the other hand:
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_gVe56iUjJEg/TEGm242-3PI/AAAAAAAAKkw/rnwvt9TTYcg/s1600/011.JPG)

In our family, "beanie weenies" was called "Penny Soup".  :D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 09, 2015, 04:26:18 AM
And for some reason Americans like to combine peanut butter with jam, which just seems so wrong to me.

I have never heard of that, add another thing to the sounds disgusting list.

Your jelly is our jello.

Fish fingers are the same.

Candy corn is super prevalent during Halloween but I don't know anyone who actually likes it.
It used to always make me wonder when I was a kid and watching US sitcoms and hearing references to peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. I only knew about our jelly and wondered how it didn't melt.
Don't try asking Americans about what they call a biscuit, either.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 09, 2015, 12:17:06 PM
Hands up for cheese on toast
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2015, 12:23:39 PM
Hands up for cheese on toast
Isn't that a toasted cheese sandwich?
I prefer cheese and ham when toasted, just cheese if it's a plain sandwich.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on November 09, 2015, 12:37:43 PM
Hands up for cheese on toast
Hell yes! I'll never eat normal toast. It must be cheese toast!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 09, 2015, 12:52:13 PM
Are we talking about "grilled cheese"?
You put a cheese slice or two between two pieces of bread, maybe add bacon or ham, butter the outside of each slice and grill on both sides till golden brown and the cheese is all melty.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2015, 12:59:55 PM
I call that a 'toastie'.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2015, 03:34:31 PM
Welsh rarebit. Heard of that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit)

Cheese on toast

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese_on_toast (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheese_on_toast)

Of course what you call cheese horrifies Europeans. In the words of Tom Lehrer "It's amazing what they can do with plastics these days"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2015, 03:48:52 PM
Welsh rarebit. Heard of that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit)
For many years I always read that as "welsh rare-rabbit", and thought it was a main meal with, well, rabbit.
When I finally discovered what it was, I went 'duh!' :-[
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2015, 04:10:39 PM
AKA Welsh-Rabbit but never come across Welsh-Rare-Rabbit before.

At the end of thew day it's just fondue without the fondue set.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 09, 2015, 04:21:32 PM
you guys are killing me.  i just wrote "humour".  like, with a 'u'.

/sigh
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 09, 2015, 04:22:29 PM
I am happy to report that I can still spell favorite correctly.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on November 09, 2015, 04:45:53 PM
Only slightly related:
Jelly/Jello(?) hit with a tennis racket: http://i.imgur.com/VwYYyPA.webm (http://i.imgur.com/VwYYyPA.webm)

As a German, I'm amused by what you (means: all other countries) classify as bread. ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 09, 2015, 05:15:26 PM
Germans have got an unhealthy obsession with Bread  ;D

Brits used to moan at Germans for putting beach towel on sunbeds next to the hotel  swimming pool when there went on Holidays, I was never interest in sitting by the pool myself would rather explore
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 09, 2015, 05:21:36 PM
I am happy to report that I can still spell favorite correctly.

You are still spelling it wrong  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 09, 2015, 05:24:42 PM
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2015, 05:36:11 PM
Quote
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).

As an American I would use pound. Quid probably comes from the latin expression Quid Pro Quo.
To confuse things In Scotland (pay attention @Saraband (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=32607)) £1 may be referred to as a Maggie after the pound coins replaced notes. Small thick and brassy and introduced by Scotlands least favorite Englishwoman.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on November 09, 2015, 06:13:27 PM
Oat biscuits? Are those like... Normal biscuits?
I've honestly never had oats before. Well, I had oatmeal, and gross. I thought those were meant for horses.
Most biscuits are made using wheat rather than oats, so there's a (slight) difference in taste, and hobnobs have a very different texture. I've always preferred wheat biscuits, never liked hobnobs. By oatmeal do you mean porridge? It's essentially tasteless, so it's all about what you flavour it with!  :P

you guys are killing me.  i just wrote "humour".  like, with a 'u'.

/sigh
It appears there may be hope for you yet!  ;D @Hedin (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=32543) seems to be a lost cause though.  :'(

Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).
Pound is slightly more formal (quid is slang after all), but the difference is so small that there's really no difference. I'm pretty sure that's the situation with "dollar" and "buck" in the US, right?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 09, 2015, 08:53:31 PM
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).
Well I'm pretty sure I'm not allowed to refer to the money at my work as 'quid', has to be 'pounds' always since I'm serving customers.

So there's no real rule to it, except that quid is more informal.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 09, 2015, 09:12:57 PM
What is a fanny pack?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 09, 2015, 09:23:34 PM
What is a fanny pack?

something terrible that no one should ever wear.

unfortunately, they do.

it's basically a purse you strap around your waist.

(https://erinhasthoughts.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/fanny-pack11.jpg)

'merica.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 09, 2015, 09:24:50 PM
What is a fanny pack?

something terrible that no one should ever wear.

unfortunately, they do.

it's basically a purse you strap around your waist.

(https://erinhasthoughts.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/fanny-pack11.jpg)

'merica.


A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 09, 2015, 09:27:41 PM
A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.

no...

no, you didn't.

really?  you've worn one?!  say it isn't so!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 09, 2015, 09:29:22 PM
A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.

no...

no, you didn't.

really?  you've worn one?!  say it isn't so!


Neon, even.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2015, 11:22:52 PM
AKA Bum Bag in the Uk.

Fanny being Bum in USAian? and slang for vagina in the UK. This is a difference you really need to know.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 09, 2015, 11:27:49 PM
AKA Bum Bag in the Uk.

Fanny being Bum in USAian? and slang for vagina in the UK. This is a difference you really need to know.
Never heard the phrase bum bag before.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2015, 11:54:54 PM
Hopefully you haven't seen anyone wearing these items either being young.

Ohh Gods they have their own blog with reviews and everything http://www.bumbag.org.uk/ (http://www.bumbag.org.uk/)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Matamelcan on November 10, 2015, 12:37:41 AM
Black pudding!  Why?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Matamelcan on November 10, 2015, 12:39:01 AM
And crikey, mate... this is a jolly old time!  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 10, 2015, 01:03:57 AM
Quote
Black pudding!  Why?

Is that a question? Why would you make it:

Black Pudding/Blood Sausage was made in the autumn when you slaughter the livestock you can't feed over the winter and after you have cooked the lights and preserved the meat not wasting all the calories in the blood and fat is the next important thing. cook up the blood and fat and use cleaned intestines to make sausages out of it and it keeps for weeks instead of going bad in a day.

Why would you eat it:

Because people starved in a bad winter from not having enough calories stored away. A late spring was a killer.
Ohh and because it tasted good.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 10, 2015, 05:41:34 AM
By Jove!

Bum bags only work if you team it up with a matching shell suit

Do Americans have onesies?

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 10, 2015, 11:33:46 AM
By Jove!

Bum bags only work if you team it up with a matching shell suit

Do Americans have onesies?

"Bum bags" just sounds.... wrong. Even if paired with shell suits. Whatever they are.  :P

And, no. No "onesies."  Whatever they are.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 10, 2015, 12:13:12 PM
By Jove!

Bum bags only work if you team it up with a matching shell suit

Do Americans have onesies?

"Bum bags" just sounds.... wrong. Even if paired with shell suits. Whatever they are.  :P

And, no. No "onesies."  Whatever they are.  ;)
Lucky you!!

Shell suit (in fashion in the 80s):
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/b2/6f/57/b26f57aea552b519979f585a5bcdd470.jpg)

Onesie (currently in fashion ::)):
(http://www.truffleshuffle.co.uk/store/images_high_res/Unisex_All_Over_Print_Ghostbusters_Logo_Onesie_hi_res.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on November 10, 2015, 12:17:31 PM
Onesies definitely exist in Murca - I remember JD wearing/mentioning them in Scrubs.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 10, 2015, 12:28:30 PM
Shell suits to onesies,how fashion changes so fast hehe

How the heck did there become so popular,matching onesies for all the family
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 10, 2015, 12:39:26 PM
Shell suits to onesies,how fashion changes so fast hehe
I don't think they're different: they're both HORRID! :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 10, 2015, 01:42:46 PM
Quote
Shell suits to onesies,how fashion changes so fast hehe

Have you noticed how fashon is reverting adults back to babies?
We had all the its ok to wear sports gear and shell suit/track suit when you are not doing sports in the 80's
in the 90's it was the backward caps and can't tie your laces.
2000 was jailing I can't keep my trousers (pants) up. Was this a cry for help?
And now onsies, a romper suit for grown ups. Just add a big coffee mug with a lid and you have a sippy cup for toddlers. Throw in an utter dependence on phones which are the absolute denial of responsibility and you never need make a decision on your own again.

The second wierdest thing I saw in tesco's was a couple and 2 kids in matching onsies doing their shopping. To be fair the little boy was below 2 so had a legitimate reason to be in one.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on November 10, 2015, 01:53:34 PM
Quote
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).

As an American I would use pound. Quid probably comes from the latin expression Quid Pro Quo.
To confuse things In Scotland (pay attention @Saraband (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=32607)) £1 may be referred to as a Maggie after the pound coins replaced notes. Small thick and brassy and introduced by Scotlands least favorite Englishwoman.

They are? I've never heard this before, and I've lived in Scotland all my life. A quick poll of spending a 'Maggie' just gets confused looks. You'll probably find somebody once said that as a joke.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on November 10, 2015, 01:54:57 PM
Shell suits to onesies,how fashion changes so fast hehe
I don't think they're different: they're both HORRID! :P

I suppose, at least onesies don't burst into flames at the mere sight of a match.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 10, 2015, 03:15:46 PM
Quote
They are? I've never heard this before, and I've lived in Scotland all my life. A quick poll of spending a 'Maggie' just gets confused looks. You'll probably find somebody once said that as a joke.

I am sure it was a joke to begin with. I have just looked it up £1 coin introduced in 1983 (gods how did it get that long ago) Spending English currency in Scotland has always raised an eyebrow at the least but pound coins were treated with disdain in both Edinburgh and Glasgow as there was still a Scots pound note in circulation. I don't know if there still is?

Found this:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/9998273/Maggies-brassy-pound-coin-prepares-for-30th-birthday.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/9998273/Maggies-brassy-pound-coin-prepares-for-30th-birthday.html)

I never heard the term anywhere but Scotland, but if the Telegraph noted it then it must have been used in England as well. A boss of mine from Fife a few years back was still calling them that and loathed them. Having worked in Hungary before Bristol (where you dont bother with Forint coins as 100f coin 25-28p) to having pockets weighed down with £1 coins.

Quote
I suppose, at least onesies don't burst into flames at the mere sight of a match.

Big hair, laquor & shell suit. Was there a way to make yourself more flammable without dousing yourself in petrol?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 10, 2015, 03:59:55 PM
Quote
I suppose, at least onesies don't burst into flames at the mere sight of a match.

Big hair, lacquer hairspray & shell suit. Was there a way to make yourself more flammable without dousing yourself in petrol?
;D ;D
For the record, I never had/used any of those 3!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 10, 2015, 04:07:59 PM
By Jove!

Bum bags only work if you team it up with a matching shell suit

Do Americans have onesies?

"Bum bags" just sounds.... wrong. Even if paired with shell suits. Whatever they are.  :P

And, no. No "onesies."  Whatever they are.  ;)

But a fanny pack is okay? Do you ever leave a plane complaining that your fanny is sore?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 11, 2015, 12:43:36 AM
Mushy peas?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 11, 2015, 01:29:35 AM
Mushy peas?
Disgusting is what they are.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 11, 2015, 05:41:40 AM
Mushy peas?
Disgusting is what they are.
And they ruin a perfectly good meal of fish and chips.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 11, 2015, 08:30:50 AM
Mushy peas?
Disgusting is what they are.
And they ruin a perfectly good meal of fish and chips.
No no no, they're lovely!!!
Totally assimilated to Yorkshire with my mushy peas :D :D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 11, 2015, 03:00:26 PM
 Mushy peas is (sort of) pease pottage again a really old way of making food last into the winter. Dried peas keep and reconstitute to green slush when soaked. How the survived the invention of the freezer I have no idea frozen peas being in all ways better.

Care to talk about the bizarre habit of adding ice to whisky and even worse demanding that Scotch didn't go cloudy when you added ice to it?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 11, 2015, 06:05:12 PM
Mushy peas is (sort of) pease pottage again a really old way of making food last into the winter. Dried peas keep and reconstitute to green slush when soaked. How the survived the invention of the freezer I have no idea froxzen peas being in all ways better.
 

We have bought dehydrated peas before. They don't taste all that great, but kids seem to love them.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 11, 2015, 07:45:08 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/11983717/Britons-express-astonishment-that-America-has-never-heard-of-the-humble-sausage-roll.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatpicturegalleries/11988935/20-British-foods-Americans-have-probably-never-heard-of-but-really-should-try.html?frame=3498013
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 11, 2015, 07:54:19 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/11983717/Britons-express-astonishment-that-America-has-never-heard-of-the-humble-sausage-roll.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatpicturegalleries/11988935/20-British-foods-Americans-have-probably-never-heard-of-but-really-should-try.html?frame=3498013
Really? :o
Ohgawd, what's a life without a sausage roll???
I bet they don't know about our pork pies either.
Now I want to go to Gregg's...

(oh, just saw the photos on the second link - Henry Dale, don't open it, you'll be shocked ;D)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 11, 2015, 07:59:17 PM
I can't believe there don't have sausage rolls  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 11, 2015, 08:03:09 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/11983717/Britons-express-astonishment-that-America-has-never-heard-of-the-humble-sausage-roll.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatpicturegalleries/11988935/20-British-foods-Americans-have-probably-never-heard-of-but-really-should-try.html?frame=3498013
Really? :o
Ohgawd, what's a life without a sausage roll???
I bet they don't know about our pork pies either.
Now I want to go to Gregg's...

(oh, just saw the photos on the second link - Henry Dale, don't open it, you'll be shocked ;D)
Made a list from those photos in the second link of all of them that I don't eat:
Chips with Gravy - its ketchup dammit not gravy!
Mushy Peas - like eating Shrek's cold vomit
Black Pudding - never even seen it :P
Haggis - not Scottish or insane
Bubble and Squeak - stinks
Pickle - perfect way to ruin good flavours, senses or any form of a noble sandwich
Bovril - I'm not living in WWII

But seriously American chocolate is also wrong.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on November 11, 2015, 08:07:22 PM
As a vegetarian I'm really unimpressed by those twenty ..."things". (Most don't even look like food.  ;D)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 11, 2015, 08:27:33 PM
@Henry (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=8080) Dale I know about mayonaise  but do the Belgians eat peanut sauce on their chips like the Dutch?

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Francis Knight on November 11, 2015, 09:34:10 PM
Mushy peas is (sort of) pease pottage again a really old way of making food last into the winter. Dried peas keep and reconstitute to green slush when soaked. How the survived the invention of the freezer I have no idea frozen peas being in all ways better.


I live just up the road from Pease Pottage (it's a little village). Allegedly the name comes from convicts stopping on their way to prison and being fed said foodstuff

Mushy peas are manky, but they are marrowfat peas. Dried split peas that are then cooked are what pease pottage is made of, or what my old Granny used to use anyway *(Also Ham and split pea soup is great when it's cold out)

Also Bovril and haggis are lush. 


*ETA I'm not sure I'd want to try it nine days old though :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 11, 2015, 11:14:18 PM
Quote
I live just up the road from Pease Pottage (it's a little village). Allegedly the name comes from convicts stopping on their way to prison and being fed said foodstuff

Mushy peas are manky, but they are marrowfat peas. Dried split peas that are then cooked are what pease pottage is made of

Thats two things I have learnt right there from your post thank you.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 14, 2015, 03:34:06 PM
What is Kool-Aid?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 14, 2015, 03:54:48 PM
What is Kool-Aid?

little packets of flavor chemicals and sugar that make a pitcher of lip-staining refreshment.

oh, and it helps you catch bank robbers.


[youtube]Ar6xC8KM-jk[/youtube]

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 14, 2015, 03:59:38 PM
Sounds like it had something to do with first aid kit

OMG that advert  :) so is that the number three soft drink in America? I'm guessing Coca-cola and Pepsi is 1 and 2 is it supposed to be like a fizzy orange drink like Fanta and Tango.



Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 14, 2015, 04:08:35 PM
Sounds like it had something to do with first aid kit

OMG that advert  :) so is that the number three soft drink in America? I'm guessing Coca-cola and Pepsi is 1 and 2 is it supposed to be like a fizzy orange drink like Fanta and Tango.

nah.  it's like colored and dyed sugar water.  you make it with flat water.  basically, it comes out like artificial fruit juice with a million times the sugar and none of the benefits of real fruit.

and, please god, i hope it's not the number three drink in america.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 14, 2015, 04:09:42 PM
That sounds revolting. From Wiki The colours in kool-aid will stain, and can be used as a dye for hair or wool

The number one drink should be Tea!  ;)


Edit:changed colors to colours  ;D

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 14, 2015, 05:05:05 PM
Love the description, it's another 'we took water and made it a thousand times worse for you'

 'Drinking the Kool-Aid' seems to be something to do with believing the company/party/military propaganda yes?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Francis Knight on November 14, 2015, 05:10:04 PM
If I understand correctly it's a reference to the Jonestown massacre (where iirc the cult leader got everyone of his followers to drink Kool Aid laced with poison)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ClintACK on November 14, 2015, 05:11:19 PM
Love the description, it's another 'we took water and made it a thousand times worse for you'

 'Drinking the Kool-Aid' seems to be something to do with believing the company/party/military propaganda yes?

Not at all.

Google "Jonestown".  Nasty cult.  Mass suicide by poisoned Kool-Aid.

Those who "drink the Kool-Aid" are full-on believers in something utterly bat-sh!t crazy.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 14, 2015, 05:11:40 PM
Love the description, it's another 'we took water and made it a thousand times worse for you'

 'Drinking the Kool-Aid' seems to be something to do with believing the company/party/military propaganda yes?

it's actually worse.
http://mentalfloss.com/article/13015/jonestown-massacre-terrifying-origin-drinking-kool-aid

i'm old.  i actually remember hearing about it as it happened.  probably because i was a child and kool-aid was a thing for me.


edit:  heh.  as we all chime in.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 14, 2015, 05:13:47 PM
http://www.endlesssimmer.com/2008/06/25/who-cooked-it-better-the-bacon-cocktail/

?????  ;D

http://metro.co.uk/2015/05/29/from-best-to-worst-the-nicest-and-most-vile-fizzy-drinks-ranked-the-results-may-upset-you-5219572/
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ClintACK on November 14, 2015, 05:18:33 PM
Love the description, it's another 'we took water and made it a thousand times worse for you'

My favorite example was Crystal Light -- because they added artificial sweeteners to the artificial coloring and artificial flavor... it was supposed to be a health drink.

(http://www.en.kolobok.us/smiles/standart/facepalm.gif)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on November 14, 2015, 05:30:30 PM
Am I the only one here that drinks Kool-aid?
It's amazing! Especially black cherry. Yum yum.
The only three drinks I care for are soda of course with Coke being the number one choice, Kool-Aid, and Chocolate Milk.
Maybe I'm the crazy one.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 14, 2015, 05:48:07 PM
Am I the only one here that drinks Kool-aid?
It's amazing! Especially black cherry. Yum yum.
The only three drinks I care for are soda of course with Coke being the number one choice, Kool-Aid, and Chocolate Milk.
Maybe I'm the crazy one.

@ultamentkiller (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40103) Have you tried the Bacon cocktail drink you crazy Americans came up with?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 14, 2015, 07:43:24 PM
Quote
If I understand correctly it's a reference to the Jonestown massacre (where iirc the cult leader got everyone of his followers to drink Kool Aid laced with poison)

That should have clicked (and didn't) even read/watched the BBC feature on it last week.

Quote
Love the description, it's another 'we took water and made it a thousand times worse for you'

Think it was a quote about Pepsi. It isn't original or mine, but it did stick.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on November 15, 2015, 04:41:19 AM
Am I the only one here that drinks Kool-aid?
It's amazing! Especially black cherry. Yum yum.
The only three drinks I care for are soda of course with Coke being the number one choice, Kool-Aid, and Chocolate Milk.
Maybe I'm the crazy one.

@ultamentkiller (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40103) Have you tried the Bacon cocktail drink you crazy Americans came up with?
I have not heard of this yet. I'm not eager to try it either.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 15, 2015, 12:25:19 PM
http://www.endlesssimmer.com/2008/06/25/who-cooked-it-better-the-bacon-cocktail/

?????  ;D

http://metro.co.uk/2015/05/29/from-best-to-worst-the-nicest-and-most-vile-fizzy-drinks-ranked-the-results-may-upset-you-5219572/

"Irn Bru"? We need Scottish F-F denizens to chime in on this. Is it the greatest of all fizzy drinks?!!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 15, 2015, 01:53:16 PM
Quote
"Irn Bru"? We need Scottish F-F denizens to chime in on this. Is it the greatest of all fizzy drinks?!!

Not Scottish but what you got in Scotland was better than the stuff you got in England and despite what the clickbait author says it was made under license in Slough since I was a kid. I am not sure when or why the recipies changed but it is a useful part of a hangover remedy. Not so keen on it sober and would argue it against it reigning supreme but it has a following.

Tunnocks tea cakes are another Scottish delicacy that is often overlooked and should be shared with the world.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 15, 2015, 04:09:02 PM
Fender Bender?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 15, 2015, 04:13:16 PM
Fender Bender?

a minor car collision.  the 'fender' being your car fender.

heh.  where are you hearing these?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 15, 2015, 04:16:18 PM
Repairman Jack series which I adore  ;D  bit Like a Fantasy Jack Reacher character and some other UF series I read

It sounds a bit rude to me
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 15, 2015, 04:23:26 PM
Repairman Jack series which I adore  ;D  bit Like a Fantasy Jack Reacher character and some other UF series I read

It sounds a bit rude to me

oooh!  i loved the old jack reacher novels.  (i wanted to choke whomever chose tom cruise to play him on the big screen)  totally gonna go add it to my tbr pile.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 15, 2015, 04:26:05 PM
Try the second one Legacies by  F Paul Wilson that's the one which turned me into a fan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repairman_Jack

@Jmack (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=37094) might have read them as well
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 15, 2015, 04:38:15 PM
Try the second one Legacies by  F Paul Wilson that's the one which turned me into a fan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repairman_Jack

@Jmack (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=37094) might have read them as well

Yup. Enjoy them very much.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 15, 2015, 04:41:11 PM
Repairman Jack series which I adore  ;D  bit Like a Fantasy Jack Reacher character and some other UF series I read

It sounds a bit rude to me

oooh!  i loved the old jack reacher novels.  (i wanted to choke whomever chose tom cruise to play him on the big screen)  totally gonna go add it to my tbr pile.
I don't think anyone chooses Tom Cruise, Tom Cruises chooses you. He is very much the Ash Ketchum of Hollywood.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 15, 2015, 08:32:59 PM
Quote
"Irn Bru"? We need Scottish F-F denizens to chime in on this. Is it the greatest of all fizzy drinks?!!

Not Scottish but what you got in Scotland was better than the stuff you got in England and despite what the clickbait author says it was made under license in Slough since I was a kid. I am not sure when or why the recipies changed but it is a useful part of a hangover remedy. Not so keen on it sober and would argue it against it reigning supreme but it has a following.

Tunnocks tea cakes are another Scottish delicacy that is often overlooked and should be shared with the world.
I wouldn't call Irn Bru the greatest of all fizzy drinks, although it's not bad. I'm sure Kiwis will tell you that L&P gives anything a run for it's money.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on November 16, 2015, 04:00:10 AM
What is Kool-Aid?

A sugary fruit punch like drink most American kids grow up with.   I'll still occasionally make some just for myself.

Edit: Just realized that I was two pages behind on this thread.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 16, 2015, 04:27:31 AM
Fender Bender?
We call them prangs or stacks down here.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 27, 2015, 11:48:38 AM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.

Bacon is the other thing. What on earth did you do to it? I can understand why you cook it to death but it's very different to what we eat in the UK.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 27, 2015, 11:50:53 AM
Ooh I didn't know bacon was different we need photos
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on November 27, 2015, 12:13:03 PM
Ooh I didn't know bacon was different we need photos

As a vegetarian, I hold no preference :)

(https://willssunnysideblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/baconguide.jpg)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 27, 2015, 12:57:13 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.
My non-american understanding is this:
they have Thanksgiving on Thursday, where they eat a lot and spend the day with extended families. By the end of the day, they're sick of each other and ran out of ideas to entertain each other, but they still have to put up with people for the rest of the long weekend. So come Friday, they go shopping, and start thinking about Christmas. Because so many people do this, shops saw an opportunity to get even more sales by giving discounts. And black friday was born.

Beats me why it's being moved to the UK, where today is a normal working day for most people - I had to go to Manchester for official stuff and it looked like there's no one employed, it was so crowded :( I left as soon as I could...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 27, 2015, 01:18:46 PM
Thanks @Arry (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=8809) the infographic explains all, Americans are deprived of the best bit. The curing is done differently as well at a guess.

@ScarletBea (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=32020) I probably ought to have worked that out. I didn't realise thanksgiving was always a Thursday. Why do the sales tend to be over a week in the UK if its just a day in the States?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ClintACK on November 27, 2015, 01:21:11 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.

Thanksgiving is our "harvest festival" in late November.  It's always on a Thursday, and it's a national holiday involving travel to be with family.  Lots of people get the Friday off as well -- with no football on TV and no family obligations.  It's traditionally the day that you can start to put up your Christmas decorations without having your neighbors look at you like you're weird.

And it's when retailers would like us to start the shopping frenzy that is Christmas shopping.  So the big stores have steep discounts on everything, and lots of people show up at the malls and shop.  It used to be lots of places would have gimmicks like the big electronics store would have the first fifty LCD TVs eighty percent off.  That kind of thing.  And the stores would often open early.  Ten or twenty years ago, this would mean crowds lined up outside waiting for the stores to open.  These days, with online retail, the numbers are thinning out.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 27, 2015, 02:23:37 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.

Thanksgiving is our "harvest festival" in late November.  It's always on a Thursday, and it's a national holiday involving travel to be with family.  Lots of people get the Friday off as well -- with no football on TV and no family obligations.  It's traditionally the day that you can start to put up your Christmas decorations without having your neighbors look at you like you're weird.

And it's when retailers would like us to start the shopping frenzy that is Christmas shopping.  So the big stores have steep discounts on everything, and lots of people show up at the malls and shop.  It used to be lots of places would have gimmicks like the big electronics store would have the first fifty LCD TVs eighty percent off.  That kind of thing.  And the stores would often open early.  Ten or twenty years ago, this would mean crowds lined up outside waiting for the stores to open.  These days, with online retail, the numbers are thinning out.

and don't forget the movies.  people always get out and go to the movies that day.

it's basically like a holiday that everyone has off, but there's no real reason.  so, retailers co-opted it as the start of christmas shopping season.  they used to even open the stores at 5am with those gimmicks clint is talking about.  now, they've crept the time back to where they're opening at 6pm on thanksgiving thursday.

it doesn't happen so much in the ... uh ... more civilized places, but there are sometimes fights about who gets the last shopping cart or toaster or whatever that morning.
http://blog.estately.com/2015/11/the-states-where-youre-most-likely-to-encounter-fights-at-black-friday-sales/

for example, it's 6am still here on the west coast, but the east coast already has news articles about this year's fights:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/kentucky-mall-brawl-kicks-black-friday-violence-article-1.2448085

/sigh

i PROMISE not all of america is like that.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 27, 2015, 03:49:00 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.

Thanksgiving is our "harvest festival" in late November.  It's always on a Thursday, and it's a national holiday involving travel to be with family.  Lots of people get the Friday off as well -- with no football on TV and no family obligations.  It's traditionally the day that you can start to put up your Christmas decorations without having your neighbors look at you like you're weird.

And it's when retailers would like us to start the shopping frenzy that is Christmas shopping.  So the big stores have steep discounts on everything, and lots of people show up at the malls and shop.  It used to be lots of places would have gimmicks like the big electronics store would have the first fifty LCD TVs eighty percent off.  That kind of thing.  And the stores would often open early.  Ten or twenty years ago, this would mean crowds lined up outside waiting for the stores to open.  These days, with online retail, the numbers are thinning out.

and don't forget the movies.  people always get out and go to the movies that day.

it's basically like a holiday that everyone has off, but there's no real reason.  so, retailers co-opted it as the start of christmas shopping season.  they used to even open the stores at 5am with those gimmicks clint is talking about.  now, they've crept the time back to where they're opening at 6pm on thanksgiving thursday.

it doesn't happen so much in the ... uh ... more civilized places, but there are sometimes fights about who gets the last shopping cart or toaster or whatever that morning.
http://blog.estately.com/2015/11/the-states-where-youre-most-likely-to-encounter-fights-at-black-friday-sales/

for example, it's 6am still here on the west coast, but the east coast already has news articles about this year's fights:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/kentucky-mall-brawl-kicks-black-friday-violence-article-1.2448085

/sigh

i PROMISE not all of america is like that.

From the frontlines... Mrs. JMack just returned form BF shopping and is uninjured.
Once some family visit and leave, Mrs. JMack, JMacksdotter and I will be going out for more BF shopping excitement, and... movies.

Keep us in your prayers. If I don't post for 24 hours after 6:00 pm today, send help.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 27, 2015, 04:49:26 PM
Quote
Keep us in your prayers. If I don't post for 24 hours after 6:00 pm today, send help.

The excuses you make to avoid writing  :o  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 27, 2015, 05:34:10 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.
My non-american understanding is this:
they have Thanksgiving on Thursday, where they eat a lot and spend the day with extended families. By the end of the day, they're sick of each other and ran out of ideas to entertain each other, but they still have to put up with people for the rest of the long weekend. So come Friday, they go shopping, and start thinking about Christmas. Because so many people do this, shops saw an opportunity to get even more sales by giving discounts. And black friday was born.

Beats me why it's being moved to the UK, where today is a normal working day for most people - I had to go to Manchester for official stuff and it looked like there's no one employed, it was so crowded :( I left as soon as I could...

Embarrassingly I actually thought for a long time it was like Martin Luther King day and raising awareness of equality for all regardless of skin colour.  Which would be a really worthy anazing day - the actual reality is rather depressing.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 27, 2015, 06:56:26 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.
My non-american understanding is this:
they have Thanksgiving on Thursday, where they eat a lot and spend the day with extended families. By the end of the day, they're sick of each other and ran out of ideas to entertain each other, but they still have to put up with people for the rest of the long weekend. So come Friday, they go shopping, and start thinking about Christmas. Because so many people do this, shops saw an opportunity to get even more sales by giving discounts. And black friday was born.

Beats me why it's being moved to the UK, where today is a normal working day for most people - I had to go to Manchester for official stuff and it looked like there's no one employed, it was so crowded :( I left as soon as I could...

Embarrassingly I actually thought for a long time it was like Martin Luther King day and raising awareness of equality for all regardless of skin colour.  Which would be a really worthy anazing day - the actual reality is rather depressing.
The good thing is we do have Martin Luther King's birthday as a national holiday, with an emphasis on social justice and human dignity.

I can't wait for those sales. They're really awesome.  :o ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 27, 2015, 07:26:35 PM
Will you be getting Daisy Dukes? I have no idea what those are I just read it somewhere in one of my UF books

I guess it just the Brits who eat mince pies? had my first one at work today since last year
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on November 27, 2015, 07:53:42 PM
Will you be getting Daisy Dukes? I have no idea what those are I just read it somewhere in one of my UF books

I guess it just the Brits who eat mince pies? had my first one at work today since last year

jmack in daisy dukes?  PICS OR IT DIDN'T HAPPEN!!


edit:  oh yeah!  i should probably explain what they are.

basically, they're really short shorts.  originally made popular by the dukes of hazzard character, daisy duke.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/0f/Daisy_Dukes.jpg)



also, jessica simpson, in the dukes of hazzard reboot, wears them pretty well too.

[youtube]DPtfsk4ETjM[/youtube]


just sayin'.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 27, 2015, 08:12:45 PM
I really hope he gets them now lol
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 27, 2015, 09:43:00 PM
Does Jmack wear Daisy Dukes to paint his garage?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 27, 2015, 09:49:56 PM
Does Jmack wear Daisy Dukes to paint his garage?
I was going to like this, but the image is far too disturbing for my gentle brain ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on November 27, 2015, 11:29:03 PM
We get the best of both bacon worlds - separate as in Arry's pic but mostly bought as"Middlecut"

(https://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-2a8c404e2bdce65df3e496907baae5e9?convert_to_webp=true)

Those Black Friday fights were horrible, we don't seem to have it here, or else I haven't noticed. On a lighter note it reminded me of this horrendous shopping trip and at the same time what a top film series it came from.  It's a bit long so just watch the first part for the shopping. ;D

https://youtu.be/NliooKg12yE
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 27, 2015, 11:38:12 PM
Not sure about that Either you have deformed pigs or you butcher them in strange ways. Thanks for sharing though I have never seen the like.

Reminds me must make some bacon for Christmas.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on November 28, 2015, 02:43:16 PM
Can anyone explain Black Friday to me? Another American tradition retailers are pushing at us and we are steadfastly ignoring.
My non-american understanding is this:
they have Thanksgiving on Thursday, where they eat a lot and spend the day with extended families. By the end of the day, they're sick of each other and ran out of ideas to entertain each other, but they still have to put up with people for the rest of the long weekend. So come Friday, they go shopping, and start thinking about Christmas. Because so many people do this, shops saw an opportunity to get even more sales by giving discounts. And black friday was born.

Beats me why it's being moved to the UK, where today is a normal working day for most people - I had to go to Manchester for official stuff and it looked like there's no one employed, it was so crowded :( I left as soon as I could...

Embarrassingly I actually thought for a long time it was like Martin Luther King day and raising awareness of equality for all regardless of skin colour.  Which would be a really worthy anazing day - the actual reality is rather depressing.

We do have Black History Month in February, not sure how global that is or is not. Its not quite what you thought the day was, but does at least bring awareness and highlights many people that have made great contributions and advancements.

The name Black Friday has to do with retailers moving out of the red and into the black, or further into the black than they previously were (red being operating at a loss, black being profit).

In other words? It's when retailers make lots of money.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Yora on November 28, 2015, 04:37:32 PM
You also have Shark Week.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on November 28, 2015, 07:26:39 PM
You also have Shark Week.

And 3 Sharknados. It's glorious.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 28, 2015, 08:42:24 PM
You also have Shark Week.

And 3 Sharknados. It's glorious.
Now I'm curious :o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 28, 2015, 10:36:19 PM
Quote
And 3 Sharknados. It's glorious.

Presumably the first two were not bad enough?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on November 28, 2015, 11:04:09 PM
Had to google Sharknado, but delighted to have discovered entertaining time wasters to provide a few hours of tranquillity  for the long school holidays in January when the YA's invade my usually quiet home.  Thanks USofA. ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on November 29, 2015, 09:56:18 AM
Quote
And 3 Sharknados. It's glorious.

Presumably the first two were not bad enough?
Actually, I think that the third one was the best.  ;D
Yes, I have watched all of them.  :-[
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 29, 2015, 12:14:42 PM
There was also some B-movie Shark thing with the word "blue" in the title? Genetically modified sharks set loose in a high ocean research facility or something. I have a blessedly foggy memory of this.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 29, 2015, 12:19:34 PM
There was also some B-movie Shark thing with the word "blue" in the title? Genetically modified sharks set loose in a high ocean research facility or something. I have a blessedly foggy memory of this.

I remember that one. It had Samuel L Jackson in and 'LL Cool J.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 29, 2015, 12:22:02 PM
There was also some B-movie Shark thing with the word "blue" in the title? Genetically modified sharks set loose in a high ocean research facility or something. I have a blessedly foggy memory of this.

I remember that one. It had Samuel L Jackson in and 'LL Cool J.

Were they the sharks?  :o  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Yora on November 29, 2015, 12:35:37 PM
To quote Chappelle Show:

Samuel Jackson: "No, I can't stop yelling, 'cause this is how I talk! Ain't you seen my movies?! Deep Blue Sea?! That was a good one! They ate me! A fucking shark ate me!" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2WBaA_PJzE)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 29, 2015, 01:36:17 PM
There was also some B-movie Shark thing with the word "blue" in the title? Genetically modified sharks set loose in a high ocean research facility or something. I have a blessedly foggy memory of this.

I remember that one. It had Samuel L Jackson in and 'LL Cool J.

Were they the sharks?  :o  ;D

LL Cool J hid in a giant microwave from the sharks and Sameul Jackson met a hilarious ending.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 29, 2015, 04:52:35 PM
There is a British version of Sharknado, it's called Midsomer Murders.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 29, 2015, 05:18:00 PM
There is a British version of Sharknado, it's called Midsomer Murders.
Ah, is that what that is?
Funnily enough, I've only watched it when I visit my parents, who are big fans and have watched the full 15 or 16 series hehe My dad says that he wonders how Midsomer still has living people ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on November 29, 2015, 05:39:39 PM
There is a British version of Sharknado, it's called Midsomer Murders.
Ah, is that what that is?
Funnily enough, I've only watched it when I visit my parents, who are big fans and have watched the full 15 or 16 series hehe My dad says that he wonders how Midsomer still has living people ;D
It doesn't, they're all ghosts (all of whom are mysteriously white...)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 29, 2015, 06:28:42 PM
it's massive in Denmark the Danes cant get enough of it which is weird as there make good crime drama like the killing

Can't beat a bit of Scandinavian crime drama unless we only get the good stuff coming from there
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 29, 2015, 08:12:47 PM
Quote
It doesn't, they're all ghosts (all of whom are mysteriously white...)

I don't have a TV so I have only ever seen snatches of this series and never a complete episode, but I am curious why this would be important to you?
Having set it up as a straw man by comparing Midsummer Murders to Sharknado, a film I believe was about a tornado that sucked up sharks and spat them out conveniently at the protagonists, a connection I cannot make.
You then deride it for having a white cast?

From 7-16 I grew up in a rural English village of 3000 people 3 were not Caucasian population is over 5000 now and probably less than 30 are not Caucasian. The comprehensive school I went to had less than 20 non Caucasian pupils. Is this somehow offensive to you? Would you deem it racist that such unmixed communities are allowed to exist?

Should all television, books and film casts have a 'correct' quota of characters ensuring some magical balance is attained pandering to sex, sexual orientation, creed, colour and so on and if so where do you stop?

I don't know you or anything about you and while I think your comment is strange in the extreme. People who tend to look at everything trying to make it conform to their ideology tend to get disappointed.

If you don't enjoy the show don't watch it, but that would never have even occurred to me if I had seen it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 06, 2015, 09:21:39 PM
Found this gem:

(http://i.imgur.com/757Jm9Q.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 06, 2015, 09:51:56 PM
Whatever that is it aint English.

Donuts= Doughnuts
Mailman = Postman Postman pat in this case
Pretzel = Pretzel
RestRoom= Toilet, Cottaging implying homosexual activity taking place
Pants = Trousers
HotDog = HotDog
Sidewalk = Pavement
Tic-Tac-Toe = Noughts and Crosses
Eggplant = aubergine
cotton Candy = Candy Floss

Oh sorry were you looking to fool American tourists?

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on December 06, 2015, 09:53:31 PM
Whatever that is it aint English.

Eggplant = aubergine


Um.
Eggplant : English
Aubergine : French

Am I right?  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 06, 2015, 10:12:14 PM
You're right but half of English is French.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 06, 2015, 10:12:35 PM
Oh sorry were you looking to fool American tourists?
I think this was it ;D

And no, aubergine isn't french, it's english 8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 06, 2015, 10:14:38 PM
Really? I always thought it was. What is it in French?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 06, 2015, 10:18:42 PM
Oh I meant that it's english because that's the word english people use. Therefore english. QED and so on
(the french also use aubergine - and it's beringela in portuguese)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 06, 2015, 10:23:31 PM
Whatever that is it aint English.

Eggplant = aubergine


Um.
Eggplant : English
Aubergine : French

Am I right?  ;)

In UK it began being  called aubergine and the tiny long squash were courgettes because all the recipes using them came frst with Elizabeth David cookery books circa 1950 - Mediterranean Food and French Country Cooking.

Before this and after WW2 British cooking except among the wealthy was very basic, limited and pretty bad to be honest. Elizabeth introduced French and Mediterranean strange new ingredients** - aubergines and courgettes and garlic ( OMG how dreadful!!!) -it just grew from there to the varied and exciting international cuisine of today. I can honestly remember when Spaghetti Bolognaise was very nouveaux exciting and"in". ;D ;D ;D

Ozzies have many families with italian origin from the 1050' 1950's and they began some of the best vegetable market gardens we have and many are still around in the same families. The Ozzies, being spoiled for superb cheap meat, and not suffering the effects of war directly regarding food, lived for their meat and veg and mountains of it in those times. Since then thousands of different immigrants have brought amazing recipes and cafe/restaurants here that we can choose food from virtually every nationality.

The Italians grew their Zucchini ( Fr Courgetttes)  and Aubergines, but although Oz accepts zucchini,  aubergine instantly became egg-plant and never changed.

Just can't resist food talk  ::)

OK class there will be a test later. ;)

** She actually persuaded Harrods to import them at the very beginning to popularise these new ingredients and very soon other more down market greengrocers caught on and the veg came across fresh from France by boat, daily at first and trucked up to London's big fruit and veg market which is what Covent Garden used to be.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on December 06, 2015, 10:24:41 PM
Donuts= Doughnuts
Sidewalk = Pavement
 /quote]
Aha! So I've been spelling doughnuts the right way this entire time. People keep telling me I'm wrong, but how does donuts make any sense? I think someone just screwed up the spelling in America, and it stuck.
As for sidewalk and pavement, I've seen it referred to as both over here.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 06, 2015, 10:47:19 PM
Quote
Spaghetti Bolognaise was very nouveaux exciting and"in". ;D ;D ;D

If memory serves an English recipe! Created by an Italian chef for his London restaurant as a flagship dish. The Italians would not have used Spaghetti but tagliatelle with any ragu type sauce and it uses far more meat that the traditional Italian bolognese.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 06, 2015, 11:17:09 PM
Quote
Spaghetti Bolognaise was very nouveaux exciting and"in". ;D ;D ;D

If memory serves an English recipe! Created by an Italian chef for his London restaurant as a flagship dish. The Italians would not have used Spaghetti but tagliatelle with any ragu type sauce and it uses far more meat that the traditional Italian bolognese.


A good example of how some special part of a local cuisine gives a name to another dish when it uses a typical  flavou or method or ingredients.  Traditionally used by chefs to identify dishes in this way and very useful.

If something is "xxxx Normande" for example it really means it has apples and cream in the ingredients not that it ismade always in Normandy.

SpagBol was originally only  spaghetti cooked "in the bolognese way", but meant the sauce was a variation of their  ragu tomato sauce, as you say, with very little meat and was good inexpensive country food. 

Side comment -most of us now in more affluent societies demand such large meat portions all the time, and I am sorry it is so because it is wasteful and unnecessary. And of course not acceptable to vegetarians and vegans and I respect those choices completely although I'm not one.

 Rostum, I know I'm talking to another foodie  ;D  Hope you are OK during your enforced leisure and can find consolation in some food prep like your Christmas bacon/ham.  I do cook for sheer pleasure most of the time but it can be a comfort occupation as well.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 06, 2015, 11:44:06 PM
Quote
ostum, I know I'm talking to another foodie  ;D  Hope you are OK during your enforced leisure and can find consolation in some food prep like your Christmas bacon/ham.  I do cook for sheer pleasure most of the time but it can be a comfort occupation as well.

Waiting to find out about a role at the moment, but it will mean relocating if it comes off. Aside from that I am looking at some very expensive training to formalise the last 15 years experience as I have been rejected out of hand for jobs because my experience exceeds my qualifications. However if I spend my redundancy on the courses I need I am then overqualified for what I want to do and will be pushed towards managerial work rather than technical.

If I am not too lazy I will get a pork loin joint from a traditional butcher in Bristol the end of next week and turn it into bacon for Christmas. This is very different from the supermarket stuff and dead easy to cure in the fridge
I have about 8lb of a mates Honey spare at the moment so a honey and white wine wiltshire cure is likely. I will have to get a new slicer as mine has vanished. I have no idea where to get saltpetre from anymore either?
i wont do anymore than a few pound as my family are all vegetarian so I either wind up eating a lot or give a lot away. 
While i enjoy cooking I don't indulge unless I have a reason to do so. Cooking for friends or the occasional date is great as I can really go to town, and it is something that comes very easily to me (except pastry. I cant make pastry) I cannot understand why people find cooking hard. I enjoy preserving and curing stuff just to keep my hand in. Through the reenactment side of things i have got to build ovens, smokehouses work a dairy and cook huge amounts of period food, often over an open hearth or campfire. That can become a challenge in the rain  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on December 06, 2015, 11:50:10 PM
Quote
ostum, I know I'm talking to another foodie  ;D  Hope you are OK during your enforced leisure and can find consolation in some food prep like your Christmas bacon/ham.  I do cook for sheer pleasure most of the time but it can be a comfort occupation as well.
If I am not too lazy I will get a pork loin joint from a traditional butcher in Bristol the end of next week and turn it into bacon for Christmas. This is very different from the supermarket stuff and dead easy to cure in the fridge
I have about 8lb of a mates Honey spare at the moment so a honey and white wine wiltshire cure is likely. I will have to get a new slicer as mine has vanished. I have no idea where to get saltpetre from anymore either?
i wont do anymore than a few pound as my family are all vegetarian so I either wind up eating a lot or give a lot away.
We tend to buy meat from a Tesco in Bristol. Then put it in the oven.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 07, 2015, 12:01:24 AM
Quote
We tend to buy meat from a Tesco in Bristol. Then put it in the oven.

Another local. I worked and lived in Bristol for years. I am up in Gloucester at the moment. Butcher I use is at the middle of Whiteladies rd by the old cinema. Not cheap but excellent cuts and if you explain what you need they will butcher to your specifications or cut a joint down for you.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on December 07, 2015, 12:04:38 AM
Quote
We tend to buy meat from a Tesco in Bristol. Then put it in the oven.

Another local. I worked and lived in Bristol for years. I am up in Gloucester at the moment. Butcher I use is at the middle of Whiteladies rd by the old cinema. Not cheap but excellent cuts and if you explain what you need they will butcher to your specifications or cut a joint down for you.
Ah I shall look out for it on my commute, though I think I can safely say i've not once been in a Butchers. Fish counter in the Co-Op was about as close as I've come.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 07, 2015, 12:20:15 AM
@Rostum (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40251) I should have remembered about re-enactment and this thread with the great title http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/general-discussion/need-help-with-dead-meat/   We should follow that up with asabo sometime.

The honey and wine cure sounds excellent.  ;D
Sorry about all the difficult decisions, I appreciate your quandary re managing and actually doing what you enjoy more, so good luck with whatever you decide.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 07, 2015, 07:13:55 PM
I believe she has now published I don't know if any cows were hurt in the making of the book though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 07, 2015, 07:48:39 PM
Yes Rostum, it was a joke. I wouldn't have used "found this gem" if I had been serious. ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 07, 2015, 09:03:18 PM
Quote
Yes Rostum, it was a joke. I wouldn't have used "found this gem" if I had been serious. ;)

Too cruel would have been like fish in a barrel.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on December 08, 2015, 04:20:06 AM
Donuts= Doughnuts
Sidewalk = Pavement
 /quote]
Aha! So I've been spelling doughnuts the right way this entire time. People keep telling me I'm wrong, but how does donuts make any sense? I think someone just screwed up the spelling in America, and it stuck.
As for sidewalk and pavement, I've seen it referred to as both over here.

Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.

I am intrigued by the dichotomy that comes when cotton candy is called candy floss.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 08, 2015, 07:12:34 AM
You floss with it to make your teeth... Worse?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on December 08, 2015, 08:25:02 AM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 08, 2015, 08:40:06 AM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o
Cobblestones for example. (Or in the Wild West: wood :P)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on December 08, 2015, 08:48:42 AM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o
Cobblestones for example. (Or in the Wild West: wood :P )
Cobblestones? If the sidewalk is made out of cobblestones, what is the road made from? I've only ever seen cobblestones in situations where they cover the entire road.  :P

I did think of wood, but are they really that backward over there?  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on December 08, 2015, 09:05:59 AM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o

Concrete


(http://civilengineersforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/compare-concrete-and-asphalt-driveways.gif)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on December 08, 2015, 09:14:22 AM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o

Concrete


(http://civilengineersforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/compare-concrete-and-asphalt-driveways.gif)
Huh, for some reaosn I was picturing concrete when I was reading asphalt...  :-[
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 08, 2015, 09:18:14 AM
Cobblestone pavements in Portugal (with the roads in asphalt):

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/cobblestone-pavement-pattern-geometric-31143951.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 08, 2015, 09:25:01 AM
For me a sidewalk is well a sidewalk but pavement is more asphalt based.  That's probably just me though.
What are your sidewalks made from if not asphalt?  :o
[/quote]

Pavement made of Paving stones ;)

(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_rl3UbJ4tOxI/TGwXn3G6fqI/AAAAAAAADkI/YAKSfg8IWm8/DSCN3413Paragon_thumb1.jpg?imgmax=800)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on December 08, 2015, 11:31:46 AM
Cobblestone pavements in Portugal (with the roads in asphalt):

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/cobblestone-pavement-pattern-geometric-31143951.jpg)
Interesting, not sure what I'd call those but they're not cobblestones to me - for me they've always been the ones that almost break your ankles when you walk on them:

(http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/a8d3e96ccb914fe282fa727282a93ed4/detail-of-cowshed-floor-with-cobblestones-brick-drain-slate-edging-e8fgxd.jpg)

Could be just me though!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 08, 2015, 11:32:57 AM
Just highlighting that the 2 above are *very* different.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on December 08, 2015, 12:45:58 PM
Donuts is the correct term, the Brits are just trying to add in a worthless U (along with other letters) again. 
You know, I actually wouldn't be surprised if Americans spelled "dough" as "do". Seems legit.  :P

Oh gosh. After I saw how people over here started spelling though as tho, I almost lost it. Dough would take it too far.
Trying to remember this other one. I'll have to ask my friend. Since I have my own radio show, I have to keep up with the latest music. I saw the title of this rap song, the spelling of which made me go on a 5 or 10 minute rant about how  society sucks.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on December 08, 2015, 02:20:39 PM
Cobblestone pavements in Portugal (with the roads in asphalt):

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/cobblestone-pavement-pattern-geometric-31143951.jpg)
Interesting, not sure what I'd call those but they're not cobblestones to me

Those are setts (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sett_(paving)).
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on December 08, 2015, 06:14:24 PM
Cobblestone pavements in Portugal (with the roads in asphalt):

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/cobblestone-pavement-pattern-geometric-31143951.jpg)
Interesting, not sure what I'd call those but they're not cobblestones to me

Those are setts (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sett_(paving)).
Maybe more precisely mosaic / Portuguese pavement (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_pavement) pieces? Though I suppose they are setts by definition (i.e. they are somewhat rectangular shaped stones).
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 20, 2015, 04:15:55 AM
Maths or Math

I am seriously concerned about the thought process that goes into math. It makes no sense to those who were taught maths.

40+40X0+1=

is the latest question doing the rounds and is being described as algebra which It isn't.
I eagerly await your answers and a reason a whole lot more stuff doesn't crash or just not work.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 20, 2015, 06:22:17 AM
41?
Obviously.
No other answer.
Or is this the brackets thing again? ::)
Multiplication always comes before addition, without need for brackets.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Yora on December 20, 2015, 09:49:22 AM
There is only one math. It's not chemistries or philosophies or astronomies either.

(Though I admit it's physics, which is also silly.)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on December 20, 2015, 10:45:03 AM
There is only one math. It's not chemistries or philosophies or astronomies either.

(Though I admit it's physics, which is also silly.)
Maths/math is short for "mathematics", so it's not really comparable.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Yora on December 20, 2015, 11:25:12 AM
In German we only have one mathmatic and one physic. That makes math seem correct and maths odd.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 20, 2015, 01:06:17 PM
There are several distinct disciplines that make up mathematics, such as geometry, algebra, arithmetic, analysis and others. In general terms the combination of all are known as mathematics.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 20, 2015, 03:50:34 PM
Ok what's Stickball?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on December 21, 2015, 01:10:19 PM
Ok what's Stickball?

I know that's an old name for baseball but I'm not sure anyone uses it anymore.  Beyond that I have no idea.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on December 21, 2015, 03:34:29 PM
Ok what's Stickball?

I know that's an old name for baseball but I'm not sure anyone uses it anymore.  Beyond that I have no idea.

I'm not sure the context for the question, but I always knew stickball as a street game substitute for baseball. If you didn't have a bat and gloves, you used a broomstick and an inflated rubber playground ball.

Meanwhile, according to Wikipedia, there's an indigenous American game as well.

But this is my stickball:

(http://i.imgur.com/UlIlI5r.png)
No one in this picture is JMack, and no goats were injured in its filming.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 21, 2015, 05:20:38 PM
I was reading the stepsister scheme and one of the characters said you holding that sword like a stickball bat I know it was an American term because another character removed his bangs from his eyes. Stickball and bangs and other American Phrases don't belong in fairy tales even if it is a re-imagined one as far as I'm concerned  ;D

On the Plus side the Author wrote the Fae brilliantly (never do deals with them)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 27, 2015, 03:12:29 PM
past two unpleasantly healthy men in wife-beaters and jogging pants

wife-beaters?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on December 27, 2015, 03:44:50 PM
(http://cdn.dismagazine.com/uploads/2011/03/wife_beater_tshirt-p235011219846390526gvgf_400.jpeg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 27, 2015, 04:10:52 PM
I was picturing a coat like columbo wears, is there a husband beater, strange name for an item of clothing
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 27, 2015, 04:31:40 PM
Sleeveless T shirts but not the same as a vest as far as I can tell.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 27, 2015, 05:34:43 PM
Sleeveless T shirts but not the same as a vest as far as I can tell.
Oh I was going to ask if it was a vest...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: tebakutis on December 27, 2015, 07:50:30 PM
So I don't know if anyone has mentioned this yet, but regarding the slang for that type of shirt, I believe the origin is from the play "A Streetcar named Desire". In that play, Stanley (the husband) hits his wife, Stella, and the character (Stanley) has traditionally worn one of those sleeveless white shirts in the play.

So, because Stanley hits his wife (and later, it is implied, her sister Blanche) people took to calling that particular sleeveless white shirt a "wife beater".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on December 27, 2015, 08:02:11 PM
You can also drink a pint of wifebeater.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 27, 2015, 08:10:15 PM
Interesting, that word history, but do people really use it? Do they say 'I think I'll wear my wifebeater today'??
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on December 27, 2015, 10:42:48 PM
Yes, they do.
It's kind of sad.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 28, 2015, 12:46:53 PM
Images for wife-beater do show a lot of vest type tops I have always associated it with muscle T shirts designed to show off your physique. I had forgotten Stella was known as wifebeater being a bitter drinker myself.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on December 30, 2015, 01:39:41 AM
heh ... yeah, I picture guys more like these when I hear "wifebeater" (obviously meaning the shirt/tank):

(http://ama-cdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/superphoto/11051341.jpg)(http://photos1.blogger.com/img/9/3002/400/redneck1.jpg)(http://www.mulletjunky.com/webimages/amerimull.jpg)


Interesting, that word history, but do people really use it? Do they say 'I think I'll wear my wifebeater today'??

I have no clue if the people that wear them refer to them that way. But, plenty of people do call them that. 
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 30, 2015, 02:55:33 AM
 Those singlet style shirts, as illustrated by Arry, were often called wife-beaters here, but always with sarcasm and now it's a derogatory term. We have so many DV assaults and deaths there has been a huge year long national Domestiv Violence Awareness Campaign, still on-going involving everyone,  sports teams and role models, etc. against turning a blind eye or ignoring signs of DV.

In this spirit this campaign also began to reclaim the singlet/tank top as we also call them-

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-11/this-is-not-a-wife-beater-campaign-reclaims-blue-singlet/6688962
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on January 01, 2016, 12:31:25 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 01, 2016, 01:01:48 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold

Took me a second to realize what's funny.   ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 01, 2016, 03:04:21 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold

Took me a second to realize what's funny.   ;D

holy hell.  the inner 12 year-old in me has never put that together!  that's freakin' hilarious!

and, yeah, kind of a coat against the cold.  it's light and thin with not a lot of insulation, but it's basically wind-proof.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 01, 2016, 03:29:30 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold

Took me a second to realize what's funny.   ;D

Doc Chill told me that was your new allias in the RPG.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 03, 2016, 07:22:51 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold

Took me a second to realize what's funny.   ;D

Doc Chill told me that was your new allias in the RPG.  :P

I'm so glad the Captain starts out dead.  :P
He does, right?  :o
please?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 03, 2016, 07:29:38 PM
I've just come across a Windbreaker, I've not heard that term before it just made me giggle  ;D seems to be a coat against the cold

Took me a second to realize what's funny.   ;D

Doc Chill told me that was your new allias in the RPG.  :P

I'm so glad the Captain starts out dead.  :P
He does, right?  :o
please?

I was thinking about having a second character, a Chinese Ninja called Bad Dong.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 03, 2016, 08:18:07 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 03, 2016, 08:32:06 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?

I've heard the movie is awful.
Haven't been to the islands.
If you want a really good movie set in Hawaii, try "The Descendants".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 03, 2016, 08:33:50 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?

I've heard the movie is awful.
Haven't been to the islands.
If you want a really good movie set in Hawaii, try "The Descendants".

I heard it was bad too but Bill Murray, Emma Stone, Rachel McAdam, Bradley Cooper? With a cast like that there must be some redeeming features.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 03, 2016, 08:35:28 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?

I've heard the movie is awful.
Haven't been to the islands.
If you want a really good movie set in Hawaii, try "The Descendants".

I heard it was bad too but Bill Murray, Emma Stone, Rachel McAdam, Bradley Cooper? With a cast like that there must be some redeeming features.

erm. Emma Stone.
Many redeeming features.
Just sayin.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 03, 2016, 09:02:33 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?

I've heard the movie is awful.
Haven't been to the islands.
If you want a really good movie set in Hawaii, try "The Descendants".

I heard it was bad too but Bill Murray, Emma Stone, Rachel McAdam, Bradley Cooper? With a cast like that there must be some redeeming features.

erm. Emma Stone.
Many redeeming features.
Just sayin.

I saw a new film advertised on the side of a bus this week called Dirty Grandpa.  Is it about you, Jaymack?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on January 03, 2016, 10:48:59 PM
Just watching a schmaltzy Cameron Crowe film about Hawaii. Is it really that wonderful?

I've heard the movie is awful.
Haven't been to the islands.
If you want a really good movie set in Hawaii, try "The Descendants".

I heard it was bad too but Bill Murray, Emma Stone, Rachel McAdam, Bradley Cooper? With a cast like that there must be some redeeming features.

erm. Emma Stone.
Many redeeming features.
Just sayin.

I saw a new film advertised on the side of a bus this week called Dirty Grandpa.  Is it about you, Jaymack?

Oh my, I can see him as the old geezer now.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 04, 2016, 03:45:31 AM
I'd quote the prior quotes, but those pesky mods don;t like pyramids.   :P

As for being a Dirty Grampa, I'd like that dirty or clean. Unfortunately, no grandkids anywhere near the offing. Neither grown kids is married or even close. I may have to be satisfied as a great uncle, at least for the short term. That seems like it may be realistic in the next year or two.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on January 04, 2016, 02:03:17 PM
I'd quote the prior quotes, but those pesky mods don;t like pyramids.   :P

You can do partial quotes to quote without creating a pyramid  :P

Signed,
Pesky Mod
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 17, 2016, 06:16:24 PM
La-Z-Boy? Is this a sofa for slobs?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on January 17, 2016, 06:30:57 PM
From my understanding, it's a really nice leather recliner. I'm sure someone can find a good picture of one...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on January 17, 2016, 07:03:51 PM
From my understanding, it's a really nice leather recliner. I'm sure someone can find a good picture of one...

Ask and you shall receive:

(http://staging2.la-z-boy.com/images/newsreleases/brand10.15.2010.3.1.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on January 17, 2016, 07:19:00 PM
Jmack special chair
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on January 17, 2016, 07:23:47 PM
My dad has one very similar to that, except without the extra pillows - but everyone just calls them reclining chairs (very comfy, actually, hehe)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 17, 2016, 07:36:24 PM
Well it looks very comfortable.  I wonder why they are not more popular in the UK?  I have noticed though in American novels it tends to be short hand for character is going to be a slob.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on January 17, 2016, 10:34:00 PM
Yay Yay Lady Ty chair - OMG so comfortable, thought just for oldies, but everyone else wanted mine so I had to get two of Oz versions.

Highly recommended by experts for playing PS games with your mates w phone & headphones while constant supply of drinks and snacks appear by magic.

Also personal recommendation for TV, laptop or book use and falling asleep. ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on January 17, 2016, 11:03:01 PM
Quote
Well it looks very comfortable.  I wonder why they are not more popular in the UK?  I have noticed though in American novels it tends to be short hand for character is going to be a slob.

My gran had an orthapedic version in the 80's so you can get them in the UK, but I think they were very pricey here. it extended out by leaning back not a lever and had a fridge for her insulin built in so had to be close to a socket.

Lazyboy was the company to originally make them ?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on January 18, 2016, 11:20:13 AM


My gran had an orthapedic version in the 80's so you can get them in the UK, but I think they were very pricey here. it extended out by leaning back not a lever and had a fridge for her insulin built in so had to be close to a socket.
Lazyboy was the company to originally make them ?

The idea of one with built in fridge sounds brilliant,even though promarily for medicine. My mother had one in 2000 that was electrically controlled. It ranged from full lying down, reclining, sitting up and then, because she couldn't stand easily from sitting, it tipped her gently out on to her feet. She just had to make sure she pressed the right buttons and didn't reverse the whole procedure. :)

Also great for people with babies to feed, or reading stories to kids, mine will fit one adult with two toddlers easily.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on January 18, 2016, 04:53:22 PM
Thinking about it as it had mains power it makes no sense that it was manually operated and she did have trouble reclining it when she got older.

Now i want one with a beer fridge, surround sound and a keyboard and mouse tray.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on January 28, 2016, 12:05:51 PM
suckers & tootsiepops are lollipops right?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 28, 2016, 01:57:51 PM
suckers & tootsiepops are lollipops right?

yup.  candy on a stick.

suckers are usually flat, round, and fruity.

tootsiepops are spheres with tootsie rolls (weird chocolate) in the center.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on January 28, 2016, 07:33:55 PM
suckers & tootsiepops are lollipops right?

yup.  candy on a stick.

suckers are usually flat, round, and fruity.

tootsiepops are spheres with tootsie rolls (weird chocolate) in the center.
I always wondered what a tootsie roll was, and why it is called that. Sounds like a word for a small penis, as in "aww look at his little tootsie roll"


Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on January 28, 2016, 07:46:06 PM
Quote
yup.  candy on a stick.
suckers are usually flat, round, and fruity.
tootsiepops are spheres with tootsie rolls (weird chocolate) in the center.

Thanks for the clear distinction. All American Chocolate is wierd to non Americans something to do with corn syrup and the lack of cocoa solids. I should have asked about tootsie rolls as well but seem to remember these being like a Swiss roll but with fondant in the middle instead of rolled up in a swirl like a swiss roll.

Mr.J i am just ignoring your comment right.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 28, 2016, 07:53:48 PM
Quote
yup.  candy on a stick.
suckers are usually flat, round, and fruity.
tootsiepops are spheres with tootsie rolls (weird chocolate) in the center.

Thanks for the clear distinction. All American Chocolate is wierd to non Americans something to do with corn syrup and the lack of cocoa solids. I should have asked about tootsie rolls as well but seem to remember these being like a Swiss roll but with fondant in the middle instead of rolled up in a swirl like a swiss roll.

Mr.J i am just ignoring your comment right.

heh.

no.  tootsie rolls aren't really cake or fondant related.  tootsie rolls are like if you combined chocolate and caramel, but it's just softer than a werther's original.

also, they're about an inch or so long.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/Tootsie_roll_small.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on January 28, 2016, 07:57:50 PM
so what are the cakes with soft goo in the middle called?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on January 28, 2016, 08:27:42 PM
so what are the cakes with soft goo in the middle called?
Are you thinking of a Twinkie? Egon would be displeased.
(http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/ghostbusters/images/7/76/GB1film2005chapter15sc041.png/revision/latest?cb=20120115133544)

Ah so a tootsie roll is just a basic little chocolate then, and rather appropriate for my comment that Rostum rudely ignored.  :'(  :-*
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 28, 2016, 08:33:13 PM
heh.

it's probably the swiss rolls that you're thinking of.  they're all at the bottom of this page:
http://www.littledebbie.com/109.29

and then, there are ho hos, zingers, ding dongs, etc:
http://hostesscakes.com/products

we americans really have no shortage of goo-filled cake things.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on January 28, 2016, 09:45:34 PM
so what are the cakes with soft goo in the middle called?
Are you thinking of a Twinkie? Egon would be displeased.
(http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/ghostbusters/images/7/76/GB1film2005chapter15sc041.png/revision/latest?cb=20120115133544)

Ah so a tootsie roll is just a basic little chocolate then, and rather appropriate for my comment that Rostum rudely ignored.  :'(  :-*
Oh man, I would kill for one of those right now. I haven't had one in ages. Twinkies, and those little debbie snack cake things... Man, and cosmic brownies too...
I think I need to go to the store soon.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 28, 2016, 09:54:32 PM
so what are the cakes with soft goo in the middle called?
Are you thinking of a Twinkie? Egon would be displeased.
(http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/ghostbusters/images/7/76/GB1film2005chapter15sc041.png/revision/latest?cb=20120115133544)

Ah so a tootsie roll is just a basic little chocolate then, and rather appropriate for my comment that Rostum rudely ignored.  :'(  :-*
Oh man, I would kill for one of those right now. I haven't had one in ages. Twinkies, and those little debbie snack cake things... Man, and cosmic brownies too...
I think I need to go to the store soon.

ding dongs, man.  ding dongs.

like, peeling the chocolate skin off, breaking it in half, licking out the icing center, eating the cake -- it's like reliving amazing parts of my childhood.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on January 28, 2016, 09:55:25 PM
heh.

it's probably the swiss rolls that you're thinking of.  they're all at the bottom of this page:
http://www.littledebbie.com/109.29

and then, there are ho hos, zingers, ding dongs, etc:
http://hostesscakes.com/products

we americans really have no shortage of goo-filled cake things.


PLEASE! let us not forget Zebra Cakes!

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51y4BjHVafL.jpg)

*they are especially good when refrigerated.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on January 28, 2016, 10:00:15 PM
PLEASE! let us not forget Zebra Cakes!

i'm sorry.  there just aren't enough like buttons attached to your post.

MOAR LIKES FOR THE ZEBRA CAKES!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 28, 2016, 10:23:08 PM
Allow me to make a correction to the above, because, well, just cuz.
A Tootsie Roll is a form of chocolate taffy.

And let us not forget the awesomeness that is Drakes Cakes:
(http://i.imgur.com/EZgFb2B.png)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on January 28, 2016, 11:04:11 PM
PLEASE! let us not forget Zebra Cakes!

i'm sorry.  there just aren't enough like buttons attached to your post.

MOAR LIKES FOR THE ZEBRA CAKES!
This is the first post I've hit like on. Of course I like all the others, but can you imagine if we got a post about zebra cakes to the top of the likes rank?
Let's do it!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on January 29, 2016, 01:19:12 PM
PLEASE! let us not forget Zebra Cakes!

i'm sorry.  there just aren't enough like buttons attached to your post.

MOAR LIKES FOR THE ZEBRA CAKES!
This is the first post I've hit like on. Of course I like all the others, but can you imagine if we got a post about zebra cakes to the top of the likes rank?
Let's do it!

I would be with you if they were Hostess Cupcakes instead.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on January 29, 2016, 11:16:45 PM
I'm surprised Lady Ty hasn't mentioned 'fairy bread'.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on February 01, 2016, 02:37:57 AM
@Elfy (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=1153), it is for you  to sing the praises of Fairy Bread, as was unaware of it until I moved here, but have made it for many birthday parties since and would not dare have left it out. Can't believe it is now on a Sydney Menu. :o


(http://1v1d1e1lmiki1lgcvx32p49h8fe.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/owlfairybread.jpgw630.jpeg)

Warning some Extreme language but the article may explain Fairy bread obsession and warn Henry Dale of what to expect ;D

https://munchies.vice.com/articles/australia-we-need-to-talk-about-fairy-bread
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on February 03, 2016, 12:44:51 AM
You Ozzies are wierd!

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on February 27, 2016, 10:16:36 PM
I have seen a ton of TV series/sitcoms and movies set in New York over the years, and just wondering, what the hell are the Hamptons?

Now from what I have pieced together is that they are a mystical place by the sea that exists about an hour's drive outside of New York.  However bad the weather is in New York, it is hot and sunny in the Hamptons.  Every New Yorker aspires to have a place in the Hamptons, and anyone who has a place in the Hamptons becomes insanely popular.  Now even though you seem to need to be insanely rich to have a place in the Hamptons, when people go there they act like college students on Spring Break/ Freshers on Fresher week.  Yet despite it clearly being a massive expense to have a place in the Hamtons, people will forget they own a place there most of the year, and only seem to go there maybe once or twice a year.  These houses are magical and don't need any upkeep the rest of the year.  Also in Winter people forget the Hamptons exist.  They seem to drop out of existence. 

Is this about right?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on February 27, 2016, 10:19:47 PM
^ ;D
I don't know if it's right either, but that's *exactly* how I think of that place too (only you described it much better than I ever could!)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on February 27, 2016, 10:47:16 PM
Would certainly like to hear more about them. Always imagine they are full of mansions and estates like that belonging to Gatsby and with water frontage for yachts. :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on February 27, 2016, 11:28:42 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/K0XRsNc.png)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on February 27, 2016, 11:51:19 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/K0XRsNc.png)

So it is LA on the East Coast? How does the weather get transported there? Wizards? Or technology only mega rich Americans have?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on March 06, 2016, 07:36:05 AM
Can't believe this is true, all our Americans, you do know what a sausage roll is don't you?

http://www.goodfood.com.au/good-food/food-news/sausage-roll-recipe-causes-confusion-in-america-20151109-gktxo6.html?eid=cpc:nnn-14omn2220-optim-nnn:outbrain-outbrain_paid-dom-displayad-nnn-gdf-nnn&
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on March 06, 2016, 11:42:05 AM
I feel I've always known what a sausage roll is (yummy!), but I don't think they have them in Portugal.
*thinks* @Saraband (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=32607), can you please check?

Edit: oh wait! folhado de salsicha, of course :D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on March 06, 2016, 07:03:52 PM
Can't believe this is true, all our Americans, you do know what a sausage roll is don't you?

http://www.goodfood.com.au/good-food/food-news/sausage-roll-recipe-causes-confusion-in-america-20151109-gktxo6.html?eid=cpc:nnn-14omn2220-optim-nnn:outbrain-outbrain_paid-dom-displayad-nnn-gdf-nnn&

Never heard of this specifically, but we often make something similar with turkey in a croissant roll.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on March 06, 2016, 08:29:29 PM
Can't believe this is true, all our Americans, you do know what a sausage roll is don't you?

http://www.goodfood.com.au/good-food/food-news/sausage-roll-recipe-causes-confusion-in-america-20151109-gktxo6.html?eid=cpc:nnn-14omn2220-optim-nnn:outbrain-outbrain_paid-dom-displayad-nnn-gdf-nnn&
They don't have rissoles either. in the US release of The Castle, they had to change it to meatloaf so that they'd get the reference. We use the word sausage roll as rhyming slang for a goal in Aussie Rules.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on March 06, 2016, 09:28:06 PM
They don't have rissoles either.
They don't have rissoles (we say rissóis) in the UK either :'( I always have them first thing when I get to Portugal, shrimp rissoles.

(http://bifofo.pt/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Rissol-de-Camar%C3%A3o-2-300x199.png)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on March 12, 2016, 05:03:32 PM
Do you have Panto in any other countries or just in Britain?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on March 12, 2016, 06:04:55 PM
What's Panto?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on March 12, 2016, 06:07:51 PM
What's Panto?

It's another name for the American presidental elections.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on March 12, 2016, 06:30:45 PM
I think it's worse ;D

*stay away from the panto, for your own sanity*

Yes, it's just Britain
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on March 12, 2016, 06:47:26 PM
I thought Australia might have it there nearly as mad as brits
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on March 12, 2016, 06:55:48 PM
Oh no! Poor them!
Let's wait for one of them to reply.

By the way, panto is 'crazy theatre/musical/vaudeville only performed at Christmas and the chance for men to dress as fat women' ;D
Anyone got a better description? ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on March 12, 2016, 07:48:55 PM
Oh no! Poor them!
Let's wait for one of them to reply.

By the way, panto is 'crazy theatre/musical/vaudeville only performed at Christmas and the chance for men to dress as fat women' ;D
Anyone got a better description? ;)

Oh no it isn't!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on March 12, 2016, 09:57:19 PM
Oh no it isn't!

He's right behind you................



Yes Australian children love it as much as British children. Always a special traditional Christmas treat, but not as common here and usually produced by local theatre companies rather than commercial ones .

The pleasure comes from half knowing what to expect, all the traditional catch phrases and audience interaction. Guess you have to grow up with it to appreciate it. Definitely a children treat but adults enjoy the children's reactions and have been known to join in with enthusiasm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantomime
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on March 12, 2016, 10:51:43 PM
Americans. Would you prefer to be living through the fiction of House of Cards or the reality of Trump v Clinton?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on March 12, 2016, 11:34:46 PM
I thought Australia might have it there nearly as mad as brits
It pops up occasionally here, but like Lady T said it's not a regular thing. Mostly it exists for Australian soap opera stars to go to Britain and make some money during the off season of their shows down here. I was actually in a pantomime once. My high school used to do one every year and perform it for the local primary schools. It was a little different in that we took well known tropes from stories and then work shopped an original story around it. I was one of Robin Hood's gang.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 18, 2016, 10:59:16 PM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on April 18, 2016, 11:54:22 PM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.

Better not visit UK,you won't survive. :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 19, 2016, 01:16:31 AM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.

Better not visit UK,you won't survive. :)
I just don't get it....I actually tried it once and it strikes me as odd. I just don't see why someone would ruin two delicious drinks by mixing them together. I feel the same way about tea and lemonade mixed.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on April 19, 2016, 03:21:29 AM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.

Better not visit UK,you won't survive. :)
I just don't get it....I actually tried it once and it strikes me as odd. I just don't see why someone would ruin two delicious drinks by mixing them together. I feel the same way about tea and lemonade mixed.

Reminds me of a song my daughter discovered and has to play the YouTube video of all the time:

Do you like spaghetti?
Yes I do, yes I do.
Do you like ice cream?
Yes I do, yes I do.
Do you like spaghetti ice cream?
No I don't!  Yucky!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on April 19, 2016, 09:13:15 AM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.

Let's make sure we are on the same page. Are we talking about black tea? Because mint or other herbal teas and fruit tea is indeed horrible with milk...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on April 19, 2016, 11:27:52 AM
I was going to reply the same. We only add milk to black tea, of course. Then it doesn't even need sugar.
I mostly drink herbal tea, though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on April 19, 2016, 11:33:13 AM
Better not visit UK,you won't survive. :)
I just don't get it....I actually tried it once and it strikes me as odd.

Oh the joys of editing other people's posts.  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 19, 2016, 04:01:16 PM
Milk in tea.....why....just why. I only recently met someone who actually does this and it messed me up.

Let's make sure we are on the same page. Are we talking about black tea? Because mint or other herbal teas and fruit tea is indeed horrible with milk...
Yes black tea. I won't drink mint tea in the first place.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on April 19, 2016, 04:21:21 PM
American tea is weak , have there got tea cosy and tea pots?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 20, 2016, 12:20:52 AM
I best stock up on rancid Yaks butter just in case Blackthorn visits then.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 20, 2016, 03:12:31 AM
I best stock up on rancid Yaks butter just in case Blackthorn visits then.
I had to look it up, and after several seconds of serious consideration I don't think I'll be visiting.....ever.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 20, 2016, 09:34:55 AM
Well if you don't take milk in your tea...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 20, 2016, 01:51:42 PM
Just tea thanks
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on April 20, 2016, 04:51:10 PM
I only drink builders tea (strong with a dash of milk.) Can't be doing with other fancy teas with no milk in.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Phoenix on April 20, 2016, 04:53:39 PM
Tea? Bleh Coffee? Bleh ,Me, i'll just stick with plain old mountain dew thank you very much ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 20, 2016, 05:12:30 PM
You drink this?

    Sugar (replaced by High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in much of the United States)
    Concentrated orange juice
    Citric acid
    Natural flavors
    Sodium benzoate (preserves freshness)
    Caffeine (54 mg per 12 US fluid ounces (350 ml)
    Sodium citrate
    Erythorbic acid (preserves freshness)
    Gum arabic
    Calcium disodium EDTA (label claims "to protect flavor" however its purpose more accurately stated is to prevent benzene formation by chelating the metal ions present in water that can act as catalysts in the reaction between sodium benzoate and erythorbic acid)
    Brominated vegetable oil
    Yellow 5

A stabilized compound that would be toxic without the disodium. Enjoy.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on April 20, 2016, 05:14:54 PM
You drink this?

    Sugar (replaced by High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in much of the United States)
    Concentrated orange juice
    Citric acid
    Natural flavors
    Sodium benzoate (preserves freshness)
    Caffeine (54 mg per 12 US fluid ounces (350 ml)
    Sodium citrate
    Erythorbic acid (preserves freshness)
    Gum arabic
    Calcium disodium EDTA (label claims "to protect flavor" however its purpose more accurately stated is to prevent benzene formation by chelating the metal ions present in water that can act as catalysts in the reaction between sodium benzoate and erythorbic acid)
    Brominated vegetable oil
    Yellow 5

A stabilized compound that would be toxic without the disodium. Enjoy.

Who has let in the responsible adult ?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 20, 2016, 05:21:21 PM
Whoa thats a bit strong, responsible adult indeed. All I did was cut and pasted from the interwebs.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on April 20, 2016, 06:19:32 PM
not only is mountain dew basically a bucket of chemical sludge, it's 170 calories worth of high fructose corn syrup per can.
http://www.pepsicobeveragefacts.com/Home/product?formula=44316*01*01-07&form=RTD&size=12 (http://www.pepsicobeveragefacts.com/Home/product?formula=44316*01*01-07&form=RTD&size=12)

um.  no thanks.

i prefer my caloric intake in whiskey form, thank you.  water and coffee everywhere else.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 20, 2016, 06:42:52 PM
Yeah American recipe it's not legal for sale in the UK. I knows that because US military personnel took great delight
in poisoning reenactors with it. A slab costs a couple of dollars at the PBX.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on April 21, 2016, 12:05:50 AM
You drink this?

    Sugar (replaced by High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in much of the United States)
    Concentrated orange juice
    Citric acid
    Natural flavors
    Sodium benzoate (preserves freshness)
    Caffeine (54 mg per 12 US fluid ounces (350 ml)
    Sodium citrate
    Erythorbic acid (preserves freshness)
    Gum arabic
    Calcium disodium EDTA (label claims "to protect flavor" however its purpose more accurately stated is to prevent benzene formation by chelating the metal ions present in water that can act as catalysts in the reaction between sodium benzoate and erythorbic acid)
    Brominated vegetable oil
    Yellow 5

A stabilized compound that would be toxic without the disodium. Enjoy.
All that matters is it tastes good. I would rather die knowing that at least I had the last can of soda, rather than die after being exhausted from a hard work-out and hungry because all I can eat are healthy things.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on April 21, 2016, 02:20:15 AM
You drink this?

    Sugar (replaced by High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in much of the United States)
    Concentrated orange juice
    Citric acid
    Natural flavors
    Sodium benzoate (preserves freshness)
    Caffeine (54 mg per 12 US fluid ounces (350 ml)
    Sodium citrate
    Erythorbic acid (preserves freshness)
    Gum arabic
    Calcium disodium EDTA (label claims "to protect flavor" however its purpose more accurately stated is to prevent benzene formation by chelating the metal ions present in water that can act as catalysts in the reaction between sodium benzoate and erythorbic acid)
    Brominated vegetable oil
    Yellow 5

A stabilized compound that would be toxic without the disodium. Enjoy.
All that matters is it tastes good. I would rather die knowing that at least I had the last can of soda, rather than die after being exhausted from a hard work-out and hungry because all I can eat are healthy things.

So I'm with @ultamentkiller (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40103) on this one. I love my Coke Zero. I do not want to know what's in it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 21, 2016, 05:37:54 AM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on April 21, 2016, 11:38:56 AM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.

Nah, dont think better of me. Youll be disappointed.  :'(

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 21, 2016, 11:53:33 AM
I wonder how addictive Mountain Dew is? I think chemical sludge is an accurate description and it will not rehydrate you, caffiene and suger content will keep you awake though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on April 21, 2016, 11:57:42 AM
I'm not saying "Mountain Dew Teeth" again, or am I? ;)

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
Don't forget your chilled, watered down whiskey.  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on April 21, 2016, 12:38:24 PM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.

Nah, dont think better of me. Youll be disappointed.  :'(

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
No no no no no, don't drink Coke 0!
Ooh, that should be a song! Wow, I'm ADD.

Anyway, Coke 0 is worse for you by far than regular Coke. Would you rather get all the sugar and risk calories, or get cancer? Because Coke 0 will give you cancer. Then again, so will a lot of things, but still. Go with normal Coke.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on April 21, 2016, 01:04:54 PM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.

Nah, dont think better of me. Youll be disappointed.  :'(

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
No no no no no, don't drink Coke 0!

Listen to this man people.  Pepsi is clearly the superior product.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on April 21, 2016, 01:40:40 PM
Blasphemy! Hang him! Off with his head! Burn him at the stake! Drown him in Pepsi!

Coke for the win! Just not Diet or Coke 0.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on April 21, 2016, 02:23:59 PM
Coke's better - but Diet Coke, hehe (Zero is for men who feel weird asking for 'diet').
I'm pretty sure the only difference to normal coke is sugar vs sweeteners
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on April 21, 2016, 02:27:10 PM
I'm not saying "Mountain Dew Teeth" again, or am I? ;)

srsly.  this is a real thing.

i drank a ton of mountain dew in my early-to-mid 20s.  ruined my teeth.  they basically started disintegrating.  spent (this is america after all) about $10k and a hundred hours over two years in a dentist chair to patch them back together.  crowns, root canals, bone grafts -- it was not fun.

i stopped drinking soda and haven't even had a cavity in the last 15 years.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Phoenix on April 21, 2016, 02:31:22 PM
not only is mountain dew basically a bucket of chemical sludge, it's 170 calories worth of high fructose corn syrup per can.
http://www.pepsicobeveragefacts.com/Home/product?formula=44316*01*01-07&form=RTD&size=12 (http://www.pepsicobeveragefacts.com/Home/product?formula=44316*01*01-07&form=RTD&size=12)

um.  no thanks.

i prefer my caloric intake in whiskey form, thank you.  water and coffee everywhere else.
I'd drink whiskey but i'm only 20 :(
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Phoenix on April 21, 2016, 02:33:19 PM
You drink this?

    Sugar (replaced by High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in much of the United States)
    Concentrated orange juice
    Citric acid
    Natural flavors
    Sodium benzoate (preserves freshness)
    Caffeine (54 mg per 12 US fluid ounces (350 ml)
    Sodium citrate
    Erythorbic acid (preserves freshness)
    Gum arabic
    Calcium disodium EDTA (label claims "to protect flavor" however its purpose more accurately stated is to prevent benzene formation by chelating the metal ions present in water that can act as catalysts in the reaction between sodium benzoate and erythorbic acid)
    Brominated vegetable oil
    Yellow 5

A stabilized compound that would be toxic without the disodium. Enjoy.
All that matters is it tastes good. I would rather die knowing that at least I had the last can of soda, rather than die after being exhausted from a hard work-out and hungry because all I can eat are healthy things.

So I'm with @ultamentkiller (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40103) on this one. I love my Coke Zero. I do not want to know what's in it.
Just like hotdogs, ya never know whatcha bitin' into(it's the same with McDonalds, I once ate there and found a band aid in my mcdouble :o)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Phoenix on April 21, 2016, 02:35:01 PM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.

Nah, dont think better of me. Youll be disappointed.  :'(

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
No no no no no, don't drink Coke 0!
Ooh, that should be a song! Wow, I'm ADD.

Anyway, Coke 0 is worse for you by far than regular Coke. Would you rather get all the sugar and risk calories, or get cancer? Because Coke 0 will give you cancer. Then again, so will a lot of things, but still. Go with normal Coke.
My mother used to say Mountain Dew lowers your sperm count ;D , good thing I don't plan on ever having kids then
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 21, 2016, 06:20:27 PM
Quote
srsly.  this is a real thing.

i drank a ton of mountain dew in my early-to-mid 20s.  ruined my teeth.  they basically started disintegrating.  spent (this is america after all) about $10k and a hundred hours over two years in a dentist chair to patch them back together.  crowns, root canals, bone grafts -- it was not fun.

i stopped drinking soda and haven't even had a cavity in the last 15 years.

Sure that wasn't the meth?

A mate of mine had a 5 litre a day pepsi habit which did the same to him in his 30's. Dissolved his teeth and after he stopped drinking fizz he put massive amounts of wieght on as his body had got used to dealing with the sugar and when it stopped getting it went into starvation mode.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on April 21, 2016, 06:53:17 PM
Sure that wasn't the meth?

as far as you know.

*looks shifty, uncomfortable*
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 21, 2016, 09:51:21 PM
Coke zero......c'mon Jmack I thought better of you.

Nah, dont think better of me. Youll be disappointed.  :'(

But i do love my hard cider, too. And good red wine.
And there's water. Does water give me a boost?
Hard cider won it for you  8)

And I don't worry about Mt. Dew teeth because mine disintegrate if I drink water...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on April 21, 2016, 10:20:32 PM
Quote
And I don't worry about Mt. Dew teeth because mine disintegrate if I drink water...

Gads not good at 20
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 21, 2016, 11:22:42 PM
No but the roots are strong which makes it worse If one needs pulled and they won't hold fillings well. My mom has more silver filling than tooth in her mouth but all the teeth are still there so I expect that's what I can look forward to
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on April 21, 2016, 11:54:07 PM
No but the roots are strong which makes it worse If one needs pulled and they won't hold fillings well. My mom has more silver filling than tooth in her mouth but all the teeth are still there so I expect that's what I can look forward to

i thought that exact same thing until i stopped drinking soda.  i was like "well, since my dad has rotted out teeth, i guess that's how i'm going to end up."  now, however, i see it differently since i haven't had a cavity in forever and all the metal in my mouth is at least 15 years old.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Blackthorn on April 21, 2016, 11:56:37 PM
No but the roots are strong which makes it worse If one needs pulled and they won't hold fillings well. My mom has more silver filling than tooth in her mouth but all the teeth are still there so I expect that's what I can look forward to

i thought that exact same thing until i stopped drinking soda.  i was like "well, since my dad has rotted out teeth, i guess that's how i'm going to end up."  now, however, i see it differently since i haven't had a cavity in forever and all the metal in my mouth is at least 15 years old.
I'd like to be that optimistic but I never really drank a lot of soda anyways because of it aggravating my acid reflux.  Lately I've been drinking more than I should,  but whether it would help to stop I'm skeptical about. Maybe in 5 years or so.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Phoenix on April 22, 2016, 04:54:05 PM
No but the roots are strong which makes it worse If one needs pulled and they won't hold fillings well. My mom has more silver filling than tooth in her mouth but all the teeth are still there so I expect that's what I can look forward to

i thought that exact same thing until i stopped drinking soda.  i was like "well, since my dad has rotted out teeth, i guess that's how i'm going to end up."  now, however, i see it differently since i haven't had a cavity in forever and all the metal in my mouth is at least 15 years old.
I'd like to be that optimistic but I never really drank a lot of soda anyways because of it aggravating my acid reflux.  Lately I've been drinking more than I should,  but whether it would help to stop I'm skeptical about. Maybe in 5 years or so.
When I was in high school I used to drink on average 5 Mtn. Dews a day...man i hated that dentist ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on April 23, 2016, 08:14:19 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/ah0zOq6.jpg)

/thread
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on April 23, 2016, 10:11:04 PM
I'm glad to see that someone else here spends too much time on Imgur.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on April 23, 2016, 10:15:13 PM
I'm glad to see that someone else here spends too much time on Imgur.
Only when I have a long to do-list!

...

*sigh*
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on April 24, 2016, 05:22:15 AM
I'm glad to see that someone else here spends too much time on Imgur.
Only when I have a long to do-list!

...

*sigh*

I feel your pain.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on May 11, 2016, 05:18:29 PM
What word do you use for the number 0?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on May 11, 2016, 05:28:56 PM
What word do you use for the number 0?
American's say Zero I believe, was always taught to say Nought myself, in the UK. I think zero would be more popular both countries now.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on May 11, 2016, 05:50:42 PM
When I'm on the phone and the person says can you read out the sequence on your card I  say the letter o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mr.J on May 11, 2016, 06:04:06 PM
When I'm on the phone and the person says can you read out the sequence on your card I  say the letter o
That too.

Guess I use that more often actually.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Hedin on May 11, 2016, 06:08:48 PM
Zero or Oh
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on June 08, 2016, 07:02:37 PM
When texting at the end of msg do you put xx to your friends & relatives is it just a British person thing ? I don't think Americans do it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on June 09, 2016, 02:46:59 AM
I've seen it done by Americans.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on June 09, 2016, 02:50:02 AM
I've seen it and XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them. They might be more common in other parts of the US, but I've only really seen them as a TV cliche, typically as the closing of a handwritten letter.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on June 09, 2016, 03:02:41 AM
I've seen it and XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them. They might be more common in other parts of the US, but I've only really seen them as a TV cliche, typically as the closing of a handwritten letter.

Love letters, my friend. Is romance dead? ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on June 09, 2016, 03:09:36 AM
I've seen it and XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them. They might be more common in other parts of the US, but I've only really seen them as a TV cliche, typically as the closing of a handwritten letter.

Love letters, my friend. Is romance dead? ;)

Handwritten letters are  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on June 09, 2016, 08:38:26 AM
I've seen (...) XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them.
@m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) uses that regularly, in posts or PMs to me ;D
Not love letters, though, hehehe, I read it as "I'm here for you and since I can't hug you for real, here's some virtual love to keep you going" :D

Here in the UK we just use the xx not the oo
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on June 09, 2016, 02:15:52 PM
I've seen (...) XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them.
@m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) uses that regularly, in posts or PMs to me ;D
Not love letters, though, hehehe, I read it as "I'm here for you and since I can't hug you for real, here's some virtual love to keep you going" :D

Here in the UK we just use the xx not the oo

i do what?  balderdash.  i'm obviously a manly man, so i only do manly stuff.  like riding 4-wheelers, and bass fishing, and watching ufc.  i'd never do anything as sissy as that.

xoxo, scarlet!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on June 09, 2016, 02:50:15 PM
I've seen (...) XOXO enough that I know what they are, but I don't know anyone that uses them.
@m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) uses that regularly, in posts or PMs to me ;D
Not love letters, though, hehehe, I read it as "I'm here for you and since I can't hug you for real, here's some virtual love to keep you going" :D

Here in the UK we just use the xx not the oo

i do what?  balderdash.  i'm obviously a manly man, so i only do manly stuff.  like riding 4-wheelers, and bass fishing, and watching ufc.  i'd never do anything as sissy as that.

xoxo, scarlet!

Alright, I'll admit it. I'm the Gossip Girl.

XOXO
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on June 10, 2016, 07:01:40 PM
What is generation snowflake?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on June 11, 2016, 03:02:28 AM
People who think they are unique and special and so interesting, but are just following the herd's latest trends. Think it's aimed at young white girls in teenage fashion and celebrity culture.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 11, 2016, 11:09:51 AM
I am a snowflake, of course. Excellent to that I'm a baby boomer white guy with no celebrity.
But I'm SPECIAL!  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on June 11, 2016, 11:53:41 AM
I am a snowflake, of course. Excellent to that I'm a baby boomer white guy with no celebrity.
But I'm SPECIAL!  ;)

Of course you're special Tinkerbelle

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMBICyEetUQ[/youtube]
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 11, 2016, 12:29:42 PM
Awesome! ^  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on June 11, 2016, 03:20:48 PM
People who think they are unique and special and so interesting, but are just following the herd's latest trends. Think it's aimed at young white girls in teenage fashion and celebrity culture.

aha!  now i have a name for it!

i've been calling them the "i'm different just like everyone else" people.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 11, 2016, 03:55:10 PM
Here's another bit of generational snarkiness. My best friend refers to 20-something professionals as "millennial zombies." They go to bars and stand around having no idea how to communicate except by texting people who aren't there or the friend standing next to them. He says.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on June 11, 2016, 04:02:10 PM
I find that odd texting a friend in the same room as you is that real?

so what are the other age groups called?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 11, 2016, 04:08:55 PM
I find that odd texting a friend in the same room as you is that real?

so what are the other age groups called?

Not sure what else he calls people, but leave it to him, he'll have something rich.

Meanwhile, I don't think zombie-ism is reserved for Millennials. I am told that my brother and his wife (trailing edge Baby Boomers, like me) were up visiting my dad and step-mom and sat at the dinner table staring at their smartphones for some minutes before step-mom declared the phones to be machina non grata.

And, yes, teens and others sit next to each other sending texts, instagrams, and more, instead of actually speaking.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on June 11, 2016, 04:58:53 PM
Saurus and I talk via instant message all the time when we're both at home alone, simply because it's convenient, but we wouldn't do that in a social situation. As such, I don't find it weird for people in the same physical location to communicate via internet, but when you're supposedly socialising it is a bit odd to me.

Fine lines though I guess. I'm absolutely reasonably certain that most people would consider the pair of us rather odd.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on June 11, 2016, 07:09:16 PM
I find that odd texting a friend in the same room as you is that real?

so what are the other age groups called?

I've been known to text snarky comments to someone in the room when I feel I shouldn't share it with everyone.  Or maybe just a question I don't want the kids to hear like "should we go for ice cream?" Cause I already know their answers and still want the option of not doing it without falsely getting their hopes up.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 18, 2016, 04:48:56 PM
No mr whippy in the usa ,  guess there stick with chickens on waffles. Brilliant what the difference are.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on August 21, 2016, 01:12:29 PM
I'm in shock, there's an American foodie article going round on Twitter tellingreaders  how amazing it is to have a European ham sandwich with BUTTER in it.

What do you guys usually put on your bread when you make sandwiches ? (Apart from butter substitutes.)

Do you leave your bread naked?

Quote
"I know it sounds weird but hear me out alright? Butter is actually a super popular sandwich spread throughout Europe ............"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 21, 2016, 02:35:34 PM
Peanut butter?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 21, 2016, 02:37:01 PM
I'm in shock, there's an American foodie article going round on Twitter tellingreaders  how amazing it is to have a European ham sandwich with BUTTER in it.

What do you guys usually put on your bread when you make sandwiches ? (Apart from butter substitutes.)

Do you leave your bread naked?

Quote
"I know it sounds weird but hear me out alright? Butter is actually a super popular sandwich spread throughout Europe ............"

Funny you say that, because yes, I do prefer my sandwiches without butter or any other spread. It's only bread and cheese, or only cheese+ham+bread, etc
(but notice this isn't a general portuguese thing, because they do put butter in café sandwiches - it was just my home)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 03:28:27 PM
In the U.S., a ham sandwich would be with mayonnaise or mustard.
And that would be most meat-based sandwiches.

Butter? I love me butter, but not on a ham sandwich.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 03:38:10 PM
Pretty sure there's a provision forbidding that in the Patriot Act...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 21, 2016, 03:52:29 PM
Do you stick marmite on ham?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 03:54:46 PM
Seeing as how I don't know what that is ... going with "no" :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 21, 2016, 04:12:23 PM
But at least you have courgettes
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 04:34:21 PM
But at least you have courgettes

No, but we have zucchini.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 05:27:12 PM
In the U.S., a ham sandwich would be with mayonnaise or mustard.
And that would be most meat-based sandwiches.

Butter? I love me butter, but not on a ham sandwich.

i don't know if i've ever done butter with ham -- butter, salt, and pepper on a leftover turkey sandwich, tho?  aMAZEing.

but, with ham, it's all about the seediest, crunchiest, thickest brown mustard available.  mmmm... mustard.

no mayonnaise, tho.  omg, and don't get me started on the grody stuff called "miracle whip".  *shiver*


Do you stick marmite on ham?

i have a friend from new zealand who introduced me to marmite.  i'm one of the only americans he knows who actually likes it.

tho, i love salty stuff so much, sometimes i'll have super-salty pretzels for dessert instead of sweets.


But at least you have courgettes

No, but we have zucchini.  :P

oh!  that reminds me!

are english cucumbers really an english thing?  by god they're delicious!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 21, 2016, 05:31:41 PM
Miracle whip?  What the heck is that?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 05:40:16 PM
It's an alternate form of mayonnaise, slightly tangier flavor.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 05:46:27 PM
yup.  a little tangy.  a lot sweeter.

it's gross.

my mom used to lather it all over everything when my brother and i were growing up.  bleagh.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 05:47:37 PM
I grew up with my mom always using Miracle Whip. Not sure why, except I'll bet it was less expensive. She stretched her dollars. (She and dad tell the story of being young marreds; couldn't afford real butter; bought bulk margarine with little dye pack to mix in and make it look butteryish.)

Anyway, Miracle Whip. Wouldn't touch the stuff now, but when I was a kid, it was the "good" spread and mayo was the "evil" spread. Just like Skippy was the good peanut butter and anything else was second rate. Especially Jif, which was somehow just wrong. And don't get me started on the failures of Hunts as compared to Heinz ketchup or the Colgate toothpaste vs. the great Crest.

Whatever Mommy bought was good. Whatever she didn't was bad.

Ah, the brand awareness of children.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 05:52:53 PM
jmack -- are you sure you're not my long-lost brother?  it's like we grew up in the same house.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 05:54:31 PM
The only brand-name I am dedicated to is ... Smuckers! Any other jellies, jams, fruit spreads, etc., are beyond the pale. I mean, I'll skip it and just have toast.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 05:57:57 PM
Here's a couple terms only popular in New England, and how we (mis)pronounce them:

Tonic: soda, pop, etc.  "Taaaahnick"
Grinder: sub sandwich, hogey, etc. "Grindaah"
Wicked: very "wwwhicked"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 06:06:57 PM
Just curious if there are any American accents that are terrible to the British (or Aussie, etc.) ear?

We got da Joysey and da New Yowek accents (mybrutha Mwahk), the Baahston accent (my brathah Mahk), the Mainer accent (my bratha' Maa-ahk) cracks me up.

Southern and Midwestern accents are there too, but the way they speak in California is more state of mindless than an accent.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 06:20:43 PM
but the way they speak in California is more state of mindless than an accent.

Makes me wonder is @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) is more SoCal or still Texas these days.  8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 21, 2016, 06:21:53 PM
I found your trick to go up in the post rankings: do lots of multiple posts vs. using the 'modify' button and adding to a single post... ;)

Quote
Whatever Mommy bought was good. Whatever she didn't was bad.
Apart from one dish that I just couldn't eat (honestly, it was vomit inducing, only my dad liked it), this is so true for me too ;D

but the way they speak in California is more state of mindless than an accent.

Makes me wonder is @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) is more SoCal or still Texas these days.  8)
Oh, I wonder if you missed it when you were out! @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) posted a link to a video where we can hear him speak - it was very very strange, for me... can you post again for Jmack?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 06:31:39 PM
but the way they speak in California is more state of mindless than an accent.

Makes me wonder is @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) is more SoCal or still Texas these days.  8)

heh.  my dad was from iowa and my mom from tampa, florida.  so, i ended up avoiding the texas accent despite living in san antonio from age 2-6, and back again from age 10-22.

that being said, i still hang on to some of the diction -- saying "fixin' to do that thing", for example, when i'm getting ready to do something.  it just sounds weird in a bland, american accent.

tho, i have picked up the california "driving on the 5" when i'm talking about driving along interstate 5.


edit:  i just saw bea's note!

Oh, I wonder if you missed it when you were out! @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) posted a link to a video where we can hear him speak - it was very very strange, for me... can you post again for Jmack?

heh.  i'll go even one step better than that last one!

here's video of me, hiding in our guest room, recording terrible, nasally audio for that 60-second book review thing overlord asked for once upon a time:
http://m3mnoch.com/static/images/Shadows%20of%20Self%20Review%20-%20m3mnoch.mp4
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 21, 2016, 06:51:57 PM
here's video of me, hiding in our guest room, recording terrible, nasally audio for that 60-second book review thing overlord asked for once upon a time:
http://m3mnoch.com/static/images/Shadows%20of%20Self%20Review%20-%20m3mnoch.mp4
:D :D
You talk like you write!!! I mean, with the hand gestures and the body motion and everything! I'm a bit like that too hehe

(I just don't get the whole 'glasses on top of the head' stuff - I know you're not the only one, but they're not even sunglasses ;D )
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 06:58:59 PM
:D :D
You talk like you write!!! I mean, with the hand gestures and the body motion and everything! I'm a bit like that too hehe

heh.  yep.  i believe authenticity is important.  this is me!

but -- you haven't seen anything yet.  just imagine what i look like when i get excited about something and all those exclamation points come out . . .


(I just don't get the whole 'glasses on top of the head' stuff - I know you're not the only one, but they're not even sunglasses ;D )

they're for distance.  i need them when driving.  or reading subtitles on the tv across the room.  stuff like that.

they also double as transition sunglasses -- so, they're kinda like sunglasses.

but, yeah.  they're always on top of my head.  i even get the ones with the grippy arms so they stay.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on August 22, 2016, 02:33:34 AM
Thank you for the butter replies. I now understand the difference. We put mayo, vegemite/Marmite, peanut butter, jam, honey etc in sandwiches, but we put butter on the bread first, as well, in addition to .......

Original reasons in UK from long ago, most sandwiches made only with salad on its own - lettuce or cucumber or tomato or even just mustard and cress. All these things make bread soggy, so thin layer of butter between keeps bread fresh but firm. As everyone became more used to making sandwiches with meat and so on, the butter (or substitute) still remains.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 22, 2016, 02:54:26 AM
dude -- someone needs to explain the difference between vegemite and marmite to me.

in my head, they're the same.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on August 22, 2016, 03:02:42 AM
dude -- someone needs to explain the difference between vegemite and marmite to me.

in my head, they're the same.
Pretty sure they're very similar things made from different sources. I'd assume marmite is from an animal product, whereas vegemite I think is from yeast. There are probably differences in taste, but nothing major.

Source: conjecture. I haven't ever tried either of them.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Deads on August 22, 2016, 03:19:25 AM
Some aussie friends got a big kick put of forcing me to eat vegemite.. Apparently my great displeasure was extremely funny.

 ::)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on August 22, 2016, 03:22:54 AM
dude -- someone needs to explain the difference between vegemite and marmite to me.

in my head, they're the same.
Pretty sure they're very similar things made from different sources. I'd assume marmite is from an animal product, whereas vegemite I think is from yeast. There are probably differences in taste, but nothing major.

Source: conjecture. I haven't ever tried either of them.

We've been here a few times. ;D They are similar but both made of yeast extract, with different flavourings, and are very strongly flavoured.

British favour Marmite, Australians swear by Vegemite and when overseas they plead with visiting  families to bring Vegemite.  Visitors here make the mistake of using too much and then it's awful and they loathe it.

(https://ablokewhocancook.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/vegemite_02.jpg)

You can try Marmite in UK m3m, but we'll be keeping some Vegemite aside for when you get down here ;D



Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on August 22, 2016, 06:31:04 AM
dude -- someone needs to explain the difference between vegemite and marmite to me.

in my head, they're the same.
Pretty sure they're very similar things made from different sources. I'd assume marmite is from an animal product, whereas vegemite I think is from yeast. There are probably differences in taste, but nothing major.

Source: conjecture. I haven't ever tried either of them.

We've been here a few times. ;D They are similar but both made of yeast extract, with different flavourings, and are very strongly flavoured.

British favour Marmite, Australians swear by Vegemite and when overseas they plead with visiting  families to bring Vegemite.  Visitors here make the mistake of using too much and then it's awful and they loathe it.

(https://ablokewhocancook.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/vegemite_02.jpg)

You can try Marmite in UK m3m, but we'll be keeping some Vegemite aside for when you get down here ;D
Lejays17 tried Marmite when we were over there a couple of years ago, but didn't like it (you can get it here, but you have to hunt for it). You're right about the Vegemite Lady T. It is nice, but you can't just slather it on. I can't remember hearing or seeing the 'happy little Vegemite' ads for years, though. Probably not since the disaster that was Vegemite 2.0.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 22, 2016, 10:44:50 AM
But... But...

Commercials!
Profits!

Aren't the brands behind Vegemite trying to convince you to use more? I mean, how fast are you gonna go through one jar and need another with that paltry amount on your toast? Are these companies asleep at the wheel?!

(Note to Atku: investigate stock takeover strategy of vegemite producers in Australia.)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 22, 2016, 10:50:25 AM
Slowly but surely, Jmack, slowly but surely!

What would you prefer? People to put tons on bread and then go "blegh, I'll never eat this again" or people putting a little bit as per photo and everyone praising Vegemite to the high heavens and buying it until the end of their life? ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on August 22, 2016, 11:14:26 AM
most of our supermarkets have Vegemite and all have Marmite in the UK. they are different in consistency and taste, but the important thing to remember is they are both industrial waste.
They are a by-product of making malt extract and it is  incredibly toxic in large amounts. Dump a few hundred tonnes in the ocean and destroy the local ecosystem type toxic, far worse than oil. In fact the greenest way of disposing of it is to eat it. There is a bacteria that can live on diesel oil, you can't culture it on Marmite.
In Denmark it is illegal to sell Marmite as the salt content exceeds what they are allowed in food products.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 22, 2016, 11:38:20 AM
most of our supermarkets have Vegemite and all have Marmite in the UK. they are different in consistency and taste, but the important thing to remember is they are both industrial waste.
They are a by-product of making malt extract and it is  incredibly toxic in large amounts. Dump a few hundred tonnes in the ocean and destroy the local ecosystem type toxic, far worse than oil. In fact the greenest way of disposing of it is to eat it. There is a bacteria that can live on diesel oil, you can't culture it on Marmite.
In Denmark it is illegal to sell Marmite as the salt content exceeds what they are allowed in food products.
:o
... and people eat THAT?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on August 22, 2016, 01:22:53 PM


 
Quote
In fact the greenest way of disposing of it is to eat it.

There you go, Australians are saving the planet,a little a day, and not letting fish get poisoned. And probably 90% of us are selflessly working away at it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on August 29, 2016, 10:28:23 PM
What are funyuns?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Deads on August 29, 2016, 10:52:02 PM
What are funyuns?

Onion ring flavored (and shaped) potato chips.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on August 29, 2016, 10:54:28 PM
What are funyuns?

Onion ring flavored (and shaped) potato chips.

Oh, I like those!  I think we just call them Onion Rings though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 29, 2016, 10:57:57 PM
What are funyuns?

Onion ring flavored (and shaped) potato chips.

Oh, I like those!  I think we just call them Onion Rings though.

they are little rings of heaven.  light, crispy, oniony.  sooooo good.

and, probably the most unhealthy things you've ever seen this side of a tub of lard and a spoon.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 30, 2016, 02:23:11 AM
Wolfie, I checked and it seems our onion rings are real onions, and these things are just fakes (or something), snack-type instead of food-type.

As for me, I discovered a northern english word yesterday: my friend kept mentioning 'spelk', how her boy had spelks on his hand after playing in the woods, but I'd never heard the word. Silly me, instead of asking, I just assumed they'd be splinters or something similar - just googled, and it's the northern way of saying splinter, yes :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on August 30, 2016, 03:44:36 AM
These are onion rings. Anything that doesn't look an awful lot like these is probably an awful lot.

(http://i.imgur.com/p5vvihx.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 30, 2016, 04:52:16 AM
yup.  onion rings and funyuns are totally different.

onion rings are rings of actual onion that are battered and fried.  funyuns are crispy chemical things formed in a circle and powdered with a salty-oniony seasoning.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on August 30, 2016, 09:55:18 AM
yup.  onion rings and funyuns are totally different.

onion rings are rings of actual onion that are battered and fried.  funyuns are crispy chemical things formed in a circle and powdered with a salty-oniony seasoning.
That's what I thought - and you still eat the funyuns? :o ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Deads on August 30, 2016, 01:52:03 PM
I haven't seen anyone eat funyuns in like 20 years..
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on August 30, 2016, 02:12:57 PM
Funyons also cause a mild case of bad breath...maybe more than mild.

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ae/f4/9c/aef49c2b5261426fd52bdb42da7ff78b.jpg)

I haven't seen anyone eat funyuns in like 20 years..

There are some in my work vending machine right now.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on August 30, 2016, 02:21:33 PM

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.

Where do the majority of those live? ;-) answers on a postcard
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 30, 2016, 02:31:02 PM
yup.  onion rings and funyuns are totally different.

onion rings are rings of actual onion that are battered and fried.  funyuns are crispy chemical things formed in a circle and powdered with a salty-oniony seasoning.
That's what I thought - and you still eat the funyuns? :o ;D

oh.  hell.  yes.

bad breath and all.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on August 30, 2016, 04:35:23 PM

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.

Where do the majority of those live? ;-) answers on a postcard

Murrrica is full of crazies.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on August 30, 2016, 05:25:19 PM
Funyons also cause a mild case of bad breath...maybe more than mild.

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ae/f4/9c/aef49c2b5261426fd52bdb42da7ff78b.jpg)

I haven't seen anyone eat funyuns in like 20 years..

There are some in my work vending machine right now.

I so want that!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Deads on August 30, 2016, 05:25:44 PM
Merica woo!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on August 30, 2016, 05:27:16 PM
New game. This week everyone has to buy a packet of funyuns (or UK/ Oz equivalent) and post a photo.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on August 30, 2016, 05:34:50 PM
Funyons also cause a mild case of bad breath...maybe more than mild.

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ae/f4/9c/aef49c2b5261426fd52bdb42da7ff78b.jpg)
More concerning is that the bread looks like it's made of plastic.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on August 30, 2016, 06:03:30 PM
 
Funyons also cause a mild case of bad breath...maybe more than mild.

Crazy people put them on cheeseburgers too.
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ae/f4/9c/aef49c2b5261426fd52bdb42da7ff78b.jpg)
More concerning is that the bread looks like it's made of plastic.

That's just the butter sheen!  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on August 30, 2016, 06:45:54 PM
New game. This week everyone has to buy a packet of funyuns (or UK/ Oz equivalent) and post a photo.

OMG YES!!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 01, 2016, 05:54:36 PM
Quote
More concerning is that the bread looks like it's made of plastic.

Looks like it may be a Brioche roll. The trend in gourmet burgers has led to some ridiculous menu choices.
Ben Elton saw it coming and gave his character  Zimmerman in stark the line  " There's half a f*cking pear in this burger" (to be spoken in outraged western Australian accent) in the days when nothing could be more silly.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 28, 2016, 08:49:11 PM
I must ask an Australian: @Lady_Ty (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=31869)? @Elfy (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=1153)?

What exactly is a "jaffle"?
Today on MC they had to cook jaffles, but I call them toasties - it's the same, right?
I think jaffle is a purely australian word.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on September 28, 2016, 10:23:13 PM
I must ask an Australian: @Lady_Ty (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=31869)? @Elfy (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=1153)?

What exactly is a "jaffle"?
Today on MC they had to cook jaffles, but I call them toasties - it's the same, right?
I think jaffle is a purely australian word.
It's sort of similar, Bea, although people put more fillings in jaffles, my Dad liked baked bean jaffles. They don't seem to be around much now. My mother even had a jaffle iron, specifically made for cooking jaffles on the stove.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 28, 2016, 10:31:06 PM
So a sandwich toaster? Butter the outside of the bread chuck a filling in the middle and shut the lid seals the filling in and fries the outside.

Jaffle is going to be Germanic at a guess and similar in meaning to waffle?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on September 28, 2016, 10:32:43 PM
So a sandwich toaster? Butter the outside of the bread chuck a filling in the middle and shut the lid seals the filling in and fries the outside.

Jaffle is going to be Germanic at a guess and similar in meaning to waffle?
I guess it was. It had a long handle, so you could sit it on the stove and then flip it when one side was done. No idea where the word originates from.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 28, 2016, 10:35:30 PM
There was a fad for these in the 90's do the same I think but different.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron)

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 29, 2016, 03:10:42 AM
There was a fad for these in the 90's do the same I think but different.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron)

Yeah, they used something like this.

I bought one a few years ago but then realised that UK sliced bread is too big, I always have to cut a bit off to fit! You'd expect manufacturers to match them >:(
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on September 29, 2016, 06:54:03 AM
There was a fad for these in the 90's do the same I think but different.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_iron)

Yeah, they used something like this.

I bought one a few years ago but then realised that UK sliced bread is too big, I always have to cut a bit off to fit! You'd expect manufacturers to match them >:(
That was an advantage my mother had. She made her own bread. I don't think she ever bought a loaf of bread in her life. The tin she used to bake the bread in was slightly smaller than a store bought loaf, and it fitted the jaffle iron nicely.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 29, 2016, 04:34:03 PM
Quote
Yeah, they used something like this.

I bought one a few years ago but then realised that UK sliced bread is too big, I always have to cut a bit off to fit! You'd expect manufacturers to match them >:(

The expensive ones are sized to English bread. I seem to recall you cut the crusts off to make them seal properly to hold fillings like baked beans (and superheated steam). They were nearly as dangerous as McDonands apple pies.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 29, 2016, 04:34:44 PM
hehehe I just put cheese and ham in mine
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: AlmightyZael on September 29, 2016, 05:09:56 PM
Oh, man! This thread reminds me of a few years ago when the forums were literally divided about what a biscuit was... British biscuits won in the end, of course :P

Friendships forgotten, blood spilled, harsh words exchanged, usernames changed and accounts deleted. Good times.  ;D

I may have embellished a little bit.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on September 30, 2016, 02:53:04 PM
Speaking of, I think it's time we finally settled this argument with a little exercise I call "The Truth". This might be hard to accept, but please bear with me.

First, take a look at this fine fellow.

(http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/iannielli-legend/images/6/6e/Cookie_monster.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150918140937)

Now that you've seen this magnificent display, take a moment to think this simple phrase:

"Biscuit Monster."

Now say it out loud:

"Biscuit Monster."

Do you hear that?

...

...

Yes, my British friends. It's true.

That's the sound of you being completely ridiculous.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: tebakutis on September 30, 2016, 02:58:45 PM
Now say it out loud:

"Biscuit Monster."

Do you hear that?

...

...

Yes, my British friends. It's true.

That's the sound of you being completely ridiculous.

Also, let's all remember biscuits are a "sometimes food".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on September 30, 2016, 03:28:47 PM
sometimes?

i literally just got "yelled at" by my wife because i went around passing out oreoes this morning for the boys and i.

breakfast of champions, i tell ya.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on September 30, 2016, 03:30:45 PM
Speaking of, I think it's time we finally settled this argument with a little exercise I call "The Truth". This might be hard to accept, but please bear with me.

First, take a look at this fine fellow.

(http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/iannielli-legend/images/6/6e/Cookie_monster.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20150918140937)

Now that you've seen this magnificent display, take a moment to think this simple phrase:

"Biscuit Monster."

Now say it out loud:

"Biscuit Monster."

Do you hear that?

...

...

Yes, my British friends. It's true.

That's the sound of you being completely ridiculous.
Cookies = biscuits with chocolate chips.


Therefore, cookie monster remains cookie monster, but biscuits remain biscuits.  8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: AlmightyZael on September 30, 2016, 03:35:21 PM
All cookies are biscuits, but not all biscuits are cookies  8)

And they're certainly not bloody scones!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on September 30, 2016, 03:49:10 PM
Biscuits are what you put gravy on.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 30, 2016, 03:54:14 PM
Quote
All cookies are biscuits, but not all biscuits are cookies

eggs no eggs crunchy or soft. Forget crackers and scones keep it simple.

Now about "Jumping the shark"?

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on September 30, 2016, 04:01:07 PM
 gravy on  hobnobs ...sounds delightful
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 30, 2016, 04:07:15 PM
You lot eat stranger things.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on September 30, 2016, 04:12:52 PM
Theres nothing wrong with baked beans on toast or cheese on toast.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 30, 2016, 04:20:06 PM
Quote
Theres nothing wrong with baked beans on toast or cheese on toast.

No, no there isn't. Now about jumping the shark?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on September 30, 2016, 04:24:06 PM
Quote
Theres nothing wrong with baked beans on toast or cheese on toast.

No, no there isn't. Now about jumping the shark?

that's from the episode when happy days is universally thought to have devolved into dumb.

[youtube]MpraJYnbVtE[/youtube]
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on September 30, 2016, 04:30:25 PM
So when Americans use the expression it means things have got dumb?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: AlmightyZael on September 30, 2016, 04:34:52 PM
Look. You don't but gravy on biscuits, unless you lot call Nutella gravy, in which case I'll let it pass. But all this shark jumping is making me crave biscuits.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on September 30, 2016, 04:52:36 PM
So when Americans use the expression it means things have got dumb?

yup.

(http://m3mnoch.com/static/images/cookie-biscuit-shark.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 30, 2016, 05:11:20 PM
I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on October 01, 2016, 01:02:56 AM
I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*

I think you mean ginger snaps.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on October 01, 2016, 11:21:17 AM
I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*

I think you mean ginger snaps.  :P
They're not brit, so I think I can call them biscuits ;)

(http://www.ikea.com/PIAimages/0093361_PE230810_S5.JPG)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on October 01, 2016, 12:48:15 PM
I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*

I think you mean ginger snaps.  :P
They're not brit, so I think I can call them biscuits ;)

(http://www.ikea.com/PIAimages/0093361_PE230810_S5.JPG)

Not a big fan of ginger cookies/biscuits. My wife loves them, but id rather have snickerdoodles. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snickerdoodle)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on October 01, 2016, 12:57:02 PM
The picture states clearly that they are pepparkakor, which is Swedish for pepper biscuits/cookies. There may be ginger and cardamom involved, though. Are they from IKEA?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on October 01, 2016, 01:00:53 PM
That's definitely an IKEA label!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on October 01, 2016, 02:27:59 PM
The picture states clearly that they are pepparkakor, which is Swedish for pepper biscuits/cookies.
Kakor also means cakes. So there you have it: A biscuit/cookie should be called a cake.  8) :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on October 01, 2016, 02:41:53 PM
Yes, Ikea ;D
I got them for free once
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: AlmightyZael on October 01, 2016, 03:25:26 PM
I just had ginger biscuits 8)

And gravy? :o *shudders*

I think you mean ginger snaps.  :P

Excellent werewolf trilogy, not a biscuit ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on October 08, 2016, 01:33:52 AM
New game. This week everyone has to buy a packet of funyuns (or UK/ Oz equivalent) and post a photo.

Annnnnd done.

(http://i65.tinypic.com/mhy7fd.jpg)

I don't know why it oriented sideways, but I am now too lazy to fix that.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on October 08, 2016, 01:55:01 AM
http://img.tesco.com/Groceries/pi/991/5051008187991/IDShot_225x225.jpg (http://img.tesco.com/Groceries/pi/991/5051008187991/IDShot_225x225.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on October 21, 2016, 07:06:33 PM
Prawn Crackers are a staple of Chinese Takeaways in the UK, but I don't recall eating them in the states do you get these?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on October 21, 2016, 10:06:58 PM
Prawn Crackers are a staple of Chinese Takeaways in the UK, but I don't recall eating them in the states do you get these?

these?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prawn_cracker

uh.  no.

not that i've seen.  i don't really do a lot of chinese food tho.  american chinese food tends to be sweet and really greasy.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on October 21, 2016, 10:24:42 PM
Yup those! Just a strange thought I ate Chinese a few times in the States and couldn't remember having them.

They are like a shrimp flavoured Quaver  ;D Quavers is a brand name owned by Pepsi  now so you must have those, right?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on October 21, 2016, 11:05:11 PM
We get them here free with every Chinese meal whether eat in or takeaway. I suspect they are to help you feel full as the texture is quite pleasant but they are very bland. We used to get them as small flat hard starch discs to fry up at home.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on October 21, 2016, 11:10:45 PM
Prawn Crackers are a staple of Chinese Takeaways in the UK, but I don't recall eating them in the states do you get these?

these?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prawn_cracker

uh.  no.

not that i've seen.  i don't really do a lot of chinese food tho.  american chinese food tends to be sweet and really greasy.


I may or may not eat Chinese food more than I should. I've never seen those things.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: m3mnoch on October 22, 2016, 12:07:07 AM
They are like a shrimp flavoured Quaver  ;D Quavers is a brand name owned by Pepsi  now so you must have those, right?

nope.  tho, they look good!
http://www.quavers.co.uk/products/

seems like a potato version of a frito.
http://www.fritolay.com/snacks/product-page/fritos/
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on October 22, 2016, 01:33:17 AM
yup fritolay own the brand and pepsi own them.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Raptori on October 22, 2016, 06:25:45 AM
american chinese food tends to be sweet and really greasy.
FTFY  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lanko on November 08, 2016, 12:47:53 AM
What is the most classy/expensive/luxurious/famous bar, tavern or restaurant in the US?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on November 08, 2016, 12:54:43 AM
If there is one, I don't know of it. I think that's more of a city/regional thing?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 08, 2016, 02:21:43 AM
What is the most classy/expensive/luxurious/famous bar, tavern or restaurant in the US?

There is a bar in Indianapolis that I visit when I go to Colts games. it's called The Noodle. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slippery_Noodle_Inn) great food and atmosphere, especially on game day.

As far as most famous, probably the Hard Rock Cafe (http://www.hardrock.com)?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 08, 2016, 02:48:00 AM
What is the most classy/expensive/luxurious/famous bar, tavern or restaurant in the US?

In LA there are invite-only spots like parties at the Roosevelt Hotel and the Tower which hosts events (sometimes after movie premieres etc), but when I was like 7 I went to this cool place hidden inside Disneyland.  This guy who's an exec took us and swiped this secret card and one of the seemingly fake doors turned out to be real and up the stairs there's an expensive restaurant called Club 33 where you can get Dom Perignon and escargo.  I stuck to the escargo. 
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 08, 2016, 12:03:26 PM
* Not the USA*

In the UK there are a number of invite only clubs or entry is in the hundreds of pounds to keep them exclusive.
London tends to be the best known for this and occasionally it makes the news when someone is taken to court over refusing to pay their tab. £20,000-£50,000 bar bills are not unheard of. Yes the idiot rich will happily be ripped off. Another reason to hate stockbrokers, bankers and their ilk.

There are still some gentleman's clubs (in the pre Victorian sense) although they take ladies now as well where you have to be invited to join pay an annual subscription (in the tens of thousands of pounds)and as well as fine dining still offer rooms should you be staying in town.

Then there are places that are really exclusive Like the SFC where you need to have served in a particular unit to even apply for membership.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on November 08, 2016, 07:33:56 PM
I was invited to join a DC-area gentleman's club - complete with secret entrance, indoor smoking, and it was truly lavish, located above one of Alexandria's finest restaurants... you'd never know it was there. Hell, my wife and I used to celebrate our anniversaries by having dinner right below it.

Fine cigars, wines and whiskeys, craft beers, whatever you want, they have it. For the low price of just $3,000 a year.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on November 13, 2016, 11:02:58 PM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 14, 2016, 03:43:55 AM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
This is so funny ;D

And you know this game doesn't exist in Portugal?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 14, 2016, 04:16:20 AM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
You're probably lucky that it wasn't changed to rock paper scissors lizard spock.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 14, 2016, 08:16:17 AM

Apparently it's used for *everything* in japan

[youtube]Kd-Tr6ErqBA[/youtube]
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 14, 2016, 02:58:17 PM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
You're probably lucky that it wasn't changed to rock paper scissors lizard spock.

I fully endorse the spreading of this extended version.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on November 14, 2016, 04:37:26 PM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
You're probably lucky that it wasn't changed to rock paper scissors lizard spock.

I fully endorse the spreading of this extended version.
And if that extended version isn't enough...
http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm (http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 14, 2016, 04:53:03 PM
And if that extended version isn't enough...
http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm (http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm)
eeeeeeek!!!! :o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: night_wrtr on November 14, 2016, 05:00:18 PM
I was going to moan that Americans had changed the name of the rock paper scissors game to sock paper scissors until I Worked out it was a typo in the book I'm currently reading hehe
You're probably lucky that it wasn't changed to rock paper scissors lizard spock.

I fully endorse the spreading of this extended version.
And if that extended version isn't enough...
http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm (http://www.umop.com/rps101.htm)

(https://media0.giphy.com/media/vbrG0MHyVIj8k/200w.gif#19)

That. Looks. Intense.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on November 14, 2016, 07:42:23 PM
Rock, paper, scissors, c*ck is a version that didn't take off.  Some smartarse thought that c*ck would beat all but then you wouldn't want any of rock, paper, scissors anywhere near your c*ck.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on November 14, 2016, 08:33:17 PM
Rock, paper, scissors, c*ck is a version that didn't take off.  Some smartarse thought that c*ck would beat all but then you wouldn't want any of rock, paper, scissors anywhere near your c*ck.
Yeah, and c*ck would probably be a sore loser.

Get it?
  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on November 14, 2016, 08:40:08 PM
Scissors, Rock, and Paper is one of my favorite analogies for stupid corporate types - who seem obsessed with the foolish notion that to beat one's competitors, one must develop a bigger rock to beat their rock, sharper scissors to beat their scissors, and fancier paper to beat their paper. Dumbasses, the lot of them.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 16, 2016, 02:47:27 AM
Scissors, Rock, and Paper is one of my favorite analogies for stupid corporate types - who seem obsessed with the foolish notion that to beat one's competitors, one must develop a bigger rock to beat their rock, sharper scissors to beat their scissors, and fancier paper to beat their paper. Dumbasses, the lot of them.

But you might need a unique take on the game.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on November 16, 2016, 03:09:18 AM
Scissors Paper Rock invaluable to parents as only acceptable and final way to decide whose turn to ride Shotgun.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 16, 2016, 03:54:02 AM
Have any of you played "What are the odds?"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 16, 2016, 10:12:27 PM
Bradley posted this on another thread, but it wasn't appropriate to reply there:
It hasn't gone away since that horrowshow on 11-9, and no end in sight.
Funny, we europeans have been saying this since 2001 ::) ;D

(why oh why do americans like to be so different?)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 17, 2016, 03:19:42 AM
Bradley posted this on another thread, but it wasn't appropriate to reply there:
It hasn't gone away since that horrowshow on 11-9, and no end in sight.
Funny, we europeans have been saying this since 2001 ::) ;D

(why oh why do americans like to be so different?)

hahahahahaha, it took me like 5 min to figure out what you were talking about :)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 11, 2016, 08:40:26 AM
Okay, this is more of a grammar question, but here goes:

I've heard English-speaking people use "Well now" as a sort of filler, or expression of surprise. But is it written "Well, now." or "Well know." ?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on December 11, 2016, 09:09:44 AM
Okay, this is more of a grammar question, but here goes:

I've heard English-speaking people use "Well now" as a sort of filler, or expression of surprise. But is it written "Well, now." or "Well know." ?

Well now. As in "Well now, shall we see what this big red button does."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 11, 2016, 10:32:11 AM
An expression mostly used by Smashmouth.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 28, 2016, 05:58:43 PM
Er, can someone help me out here? I have a bunch of raiders attacking in a Mad Max-esque, cobbled-together vehicle, and the whole thing includes metal plates lined up on the roof, for shooters to use as cover. What the heck do I call a meter-high wall for this specific purpose?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Mehman on December 28, 2016, 06:37:19 PM
I would call it a gun shield, @Eli_Freysson.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on December 28, 2016, 11:09:22 PM
Turret?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 28, 2016, 11:42:00 PM
Turret?

I mean the actual defence-thingie.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 28, 2016, 11:46:07 PM
armour plate BTW a thin bit of steel of 2-3 mm over 13mm plywood weatherboard works better than 8 mm of steel plate and is a lot lighter.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on December 29, 2016, 12:31:01 AM
I'd call it a turret if it spins. The position could be called a turret if the gun spins, or the call it a name for its position: roof-gun, etc. We call door guns that way.

If it's supposed to stop bullets, as Rostum says, it needs to be heavy, otherwise it might as well be paper. And perhaps he's encountered stronger plywood than I've seen, but I covered my entire Humvee in 1/4" (6.35mm) steel for shrapnel, but even a baby M-16 bullet goes through that. You want 1/2" thick (12.5MM) steel plates to stop all but the heaviest (50 caliber) rounds.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on December 29, 2016, 08:34:35 AM
Isn't a turret a defensive "tower" with covered places/holes for archers/gunners to shoot from, though?

I'd call it a turret if it spins.
Wouldn't that be a gun turret?


But what do I know; I'm not a Brit/American.  :P
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on December 29, 2016, 10:14:19 AM
Battlements?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 29, 2016, 10:56:41 AM
Battlements?

That's the one!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on December 29, 2016, 11:12:13 AM
Battlements?

That's the one!

I've been trying to think of a clever wording that takes into account the mobility of these battlements. Nada. But the squirrels are back in the library hunting for it.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 29, 2016, 12:53:51 PM
crenelations are the bits on top of castle walls that you hide behind. This doesn't translate to vehicles though and I would argue that battlements is not a good fit, just better than everything else.

Quote
If it's supposed to stop bullets, as Rostum says, it needs to be heavy, otherwise it might as well be paper. And perhaps he's encountered stronger plywood than I've seen, but I covered my entire Humvee in 1/4" (6.35mm) steel for shrapnel, but even a baby M-16 bullet goes through that. You want 1/2" thick (12.5MM) steel plates to stop all but the heaviest (50 caliber) rounds.

short answer rather than the long rambling one I initially wrote.

Srebrenica not having much in the way of resource to rescue those hit by mortars or sniper fire cars had all the doors ripped off and ply and steel plate bolted to one side, Some had Kevlar blankets under the ply to catch splinters (wonder where they came from) they would rush out into the danger area with the armoured side outwards and reverse back in to safe streets to keep the armour between them and those shooting at them. I am sure they would have preferred an armoured convoy to secure a perimeter and ambulances but made do with what they had. Most of what was being shot at them was 7.62 and probably wad cutters and hollow point hunting rounds from over 200 meters away. Military 7.62 or your M855 round may have cut clean through. 12.5mm rounds are not going to be stopped by much short of a military armoured vehicle designed to do so.

Ply was effective as the wood compresses and the glue spreads force while holding it all together and the initial 2-3mm of steel takes a lot of bite from the round allowing the ply to work. 8mm+ of steel would be too heavy to move by a Yugo or Trabant it was mounted to. Would be great if you can test this plate, thin plate and 13mm ply against jacketed,target and hunting ammunition.

So shorter answer it's better than nothing and I suspect Eli is writing his dystopian future round bunches of scavenging neo-savages and not a well equipped military.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on December 29, 2016, 04:13:05 PM
crenelations are the bits on top of castle walls that you hide behind. This doesn't translate to vehicles though and I would argue that battlements is not a good fit, just better than everything else.
I agree. You might be able to get away with crenelations though. Vehicular crenelations? Shrugs. I don't know. Maybe there's not a good answer for this, and you're breaking new ground here.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 31, 2016, 10:22:38 PM
Is it just Americans who add super to everything? Or is it a generation thing

Super annoying
Super great
Super cereals
Super duper
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 01, 2017, 12:22:43 AM
Is it just Americans who add super to everything? Or is it a generation thing

Super annoying
Super great
Super cereals
Super duper

It's because we're supercilious.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on January 01, 2017, 12:57:40 AM
In the UK's Swinging Sixties the young daughters of the rich, who lived and occasionally worked around Chelsea and London's West End were known as Sloanites. They socialised and  congregated around the clubs, bars and fashion shops like Mary Quant in Sloane Street Chelsea. Everything they approved was "Absolutely Soooper!! or Absolutely Faaabulous!!!!"

They wore exciting new mini length clothes. high boots  and Vidal Sassoon haircuts. We all copied them at the time because it was so" Ïn" and to be honest that was a fantastically wonderful time to be alive. I also knew Sloane Street well, because I washed up, served and cooked in a popular coffee bar, called The Kenya Coffee House, there to keep my student body and soul together for a while.

(http://www.vanityfairrewards.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/1960s-Fashion.jpg)

The glorious Ab Fab ladies would have been the epitome of Sloanites. So "Super" became a slang coverall adjective for anything you liked. It lasted for years until superceded by Wicked, Sick etc. but if you find someone who still uses it that way you can date them pretty well. ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on January 01, 2017, 01:31:08 AM
NB All rights reserved to above comment. I need to keep it for the memoirs I have to self publish and if you have no idea what I'm talking about read the current thread about

http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/writers-corner/self-publishing-an-insult-to-the-written-word/msg162839/#msg162839
 ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on January 01, 2017, 05:40:06 AM
In the UK's Swinging Sixties the young daughters of the rich, who lived and occasionally worked around Chelsea and London's West End were known as Sloanites. They socialised and  congregated around the clubs, bars and fashion shops like Mary Quant in Sloane Street Chelsea. Everything they approved was "Absolutely Soooper!! or Absolutely Faaabulous!!!!"

They wore exciting new mini length clothes. high boots  and Vidal Sassoon haircuts. We all copied them at the time because it was so" Ïn" and to be honest that was a fantastically wonderful time to be alive. I also knew Sloane Street well, because I washed up, served and cooked in a popular coffee bar, called The Kenya Coffee House, there to keep my student body and soul together for a while.

(http://www.vanityfairrewards.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/1960s-Fashion.jpg)

The glorious Ab Fab ladies would have been the epitome of Sloanites. So "Super" became a slang coverall adjective for anything you liked. It lasted for years until superceded by Wicked, Sick etc. but if you find someone who still uses it that way you can date them pretty well. ;)
Were they the forerunners to the Sloane Rangers? I remember Lady Di was described as a Sloane Ranger before she married Charles. Took me years to work out what one actually was.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 01, 2017, 07:04:23 PM
Just been watching Brooklyn 911.  Scully and Hitchcock have just stolen Detective Diaz' Moose Tracks.  What are Moose Tracks?  And why is it so humorous that hard as nails Diaz eats Moose Tracks?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on January 02, 2017, 08:12:55 PM
Just been watching Brooklyn 911.  Scully and Hitchcock have just stolen Detective Diaz' Moose Tracks.  What are Moose Tracks?  And why is it so humorous that hard as nails Diaz eats Moose Tracks?

Moose Tracks is a flavor of ice cream: vanilla ice cream mixed    with "Moose Tracks" brand fudge made into peanut butter cups. This is a woose flavor of ice cream for kids, women, and weak men. Real men do not eat Moose Tracks.

[Leveling up!]
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Nighteyes on January 02, 2017, 08:34:43 PM
Just been watching Brooklyn 911.  Scully and Hitchcock have just stolen Detective Diaz' Moose Tracks.  What are Moose Tracks?  And why is it so humorous that hard as nails Diaz eats Moose Tracks?

Moose Tracks is a flavor of ice cream: vanilla ice cream mixed    with "Moose Tracks" brand fudge made into peanut butter cups. This is a woose flavor of ice cream for kids, women, and weak men. Real men do not eat Moose Tracks.

[Leveling up!]

Hmmmm... This explanation sounds very Richard Hammond...

And I must be a weak man as really want some Moose Tracks now ...

Cheers Homie.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on January 09, 2017, 10:25:16 AM
I found this in Ben Aaronovitch's blog site - might be useful for americans ;D

http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.co.uk/p/the-peter-grant-glossery.html (http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.co.uk/p/the-peter-grant-glossery.html)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on April 02, 2017, 11:12:13 PM
I just have one quick language-use question. I'm writing a scene where a character's superpowers activate, and her mind's intake goes into hypermode. Basically, she experiences bullet time. Does "overcranked" worked as a description? As in "Her overcranked mind took in..."

The idea is that she has real trouble thinking clearly through all this input.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on April 03, 2017, 01:00:05 AM
Maybe hyper or over added in front of sensitised, energised or intensified?
Cranked aligns with engineering and although it wouldn't be wrong it feels rather bulky, clumsy, for a mind.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on April 03, 2017, 01:27:05 AM
I just have one quick language-use question. I'm writing a scene where a character's superpowers activate, and her mind's intake goes into hypermode. Basically, she experiences bullet time. Does "overcranked" worked as a description? As in "Her overcranked mind took in..."

The idea is that she has real trouble thinking clearly through all this input.
First, yes, it conveys what you expect it to from an American perspective. However, it brings some baggage, although you need more data points than just my own.
The term "over", and its cousins Lady_Ty described all work well. The term "cranked" recalls crank, a drug, to mind, which perhaps is appropriate, perhaps not, depending on your desires. IMHO, since you are leveraging mechanical terms, if you want to convey the "too much" aspect of things, you should also borrow from such terms. Gears snapping off teeth, belts whining and whistling over their drivers, and chains jumping their cogs, etc.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 21, 2017, 05:06:22 PM
I was reading this article on different "englishes" and I found one thing I didn't know:

"In the USA, for example, you might well embarrass yourself if you turned up dressed as Superman for a party described as 'fancy dress'. Fancy dress in America simply means formal clothes"
 :o :o
 ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on May 21, 2017, 08:51:50 PM
I was reading this article on different "englishes" and I found one thing I didn't know:

"In the USA, for example, you might well embarrass yourself if you turned up dressed as Superman for a party described as 'fancy dress'. Fancy dress in America simply means formal clothes"
 :o :o
 ;D

Um... if fancy dress in England doesn't mean fancy dress, then it means... fanciful dress?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 21, 2017, 09:46:55 PM
Hmmm fancy dress is fancy dress, I mean, costumes.
 8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on May 21, 2017, 09:49:12 PM
Hey, I just wanted to drop in with one little English-language question:

I have a female character who takes on the role of grand master of an order. But would that be "grand mistress", or is it a genderless title in that context?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on May 21, 2017, 10:39:58 PM
What do Americans call a fancy dress party then when there dress up as superheroes?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on May 22, 2017, 01:26:18 AM
Hey, I just wanted to drop in with one little English-language question:

I have a female character who takes on the role of grand master of an order. But would that be "grand mistress", or is it a genderless title in that context?

I've discussed this with a female editor and she advised I skip gendered terms altogether for female masters, sorcerers, etc. I forget her reasoning with them all, but the term 'mistress' is most often applied to a woman sleeping with someone's husband, and asking American readers to overlook that usage is ... unrealistic.

I would advise a rarely used words - there are so many for the heads of orders, not to mention all the ones you could create, such as Martin's "Hand" for the King's lead counsellor, Herbert's Reverend Mothers from Dune, and Jordan's Ameryllin Seat (sp?) for the head of the Aes Sedai. My little term-tool kicked out these terms for mistress you can look at, if you like. Not all are female, but I'm too lazy to filter them out :)

bwana
Dame
dean
diva
Dom
don
dona
Eminence
Esquire
Excellency
Father
Frau
grace
Herr
Highness
Holiness
Holy Father
Holy Mother
Honor
Honorable
Imperial Highness
Imperial Majesty
lady
ladyship
liege
lieutenant
lord
lordship
ma’am
madam
madame
mademoiselle
maharishi
majesty
massa
master
memsahib
milady
miss
mister
mistress
monsieur
monsignor
most honorable
most reverend
Mother
Mr.
Mrs.
Ms.
my lady
my liege
my lord
officer
padre
rabbi
reverence
reverend
right honorable
right reverend
rinpoche
Royal Highness
Royal Majesty
sahib
sergeant
señor
señora
señorita
Serene Highness
Serene Majesty
signora
signore
signorina
sir
sire
sirrah
Sister
sister
sri
swami
taipan
worship
yogi
Your Eminence
Your Excellency
Your Grace
Your Highness
Your Holiness
Your Honor
Your Majesty
Your Reverence
Your Worship
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on May 22, 2017, 03:04:14 AM
What do Americans call a fancy dress party then when there dress up as superheroes?

Comicon
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on May 28, 2017, 01:24:46 PM
Hey, one little grammar question.

When a sentence is structured thusly...

"He, too, was there."

... should the commas be there?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 28, 2017, 04:03:43 PM
Yes, the commas are correct - but it sounds quite formal, is that the intention?
Otherwise you can just go with "He was also there"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on May 28, 2017, 08:14:22 PM
What do Americans call a fancy dress party then when there dress up as superheroes?

Comicon
Isn't it the same name UK & Ireland as it's mostly a US invention?
(Japanese Cosplay isn't quite the same, but you do see cosplay outfits at comicons in UK and Ireland)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on May 28, 2017, 09:22:47 PM
Well we don't all dress up as superheroes some people dress up as French maids, naughty nurses and that's just the men  you can dress up as cartoon characters or anything your imagination takes you and not limited to superheroes and villains.

British men just love dressing up as women ;-)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on May 29, 2017, 02:08:24 PM
Another one. I am just full of questions lately.

When referring to a group of people who are all strong-willed, is "will" written as singular or plural?

"Their iron will..."

or

"Their iron wills..."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on May 29, 2017, 02:09:20 PM
Singular, as a substantive noun like water in most uses. Also, the use of singular suggests they were united.

ETA: technically, either would be correct, so there's no rule to point to. But again, singular would be preferred, unless you were talking about them displaying their iron will individually at different times and places.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 29, 2017, 02:26:34 PM
And between 'surgery' and 'operation', is there a brit/american difference, one country using one version more? Which one?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on May 29, 2017, 02:36:13 PM
Good question Bea. I don't know.  American English tends to favor the less specific, I'm sad to confess, and in America, they're both used interchangeably by those outside the medical field, so far as I know. "Operation" is an older usage; as a noun, I think "procedure" and other synonyms have taken the lead. As a verb, operate trumps all, I think, being shorter and not needing an assisting verb (i.e., perform surgery vs. operate). We don't usually use surgery as a noun.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on May 29, 2017, 02:55:49 PM
Well, sort of as a noun: "they're doing surgery." 'I'm going in for surgery."

What we don't do is describe a doctor's office as a "surgery". Surgery is an operation or procedure, not a place. Though if someone or a doctor, nurse, etc. is currently conducting surgery, we'll say "she's in surgery."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on May 29, 2017, 05:16:44 PM
Another one. I am just full of questions lately.

When referring to a group of people who are all strong-willed, is "will" written as singular or plural?

"Their iron will..."

or

"Their iron wills..."
It depends on context. Are they united, or are they clashing? If their clashing, wills. If their united, will.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on June 08, 2017, 09:13:14 PM
I'm just going to keep taking advantage of your helpfulness, regarding grammar questions too minor to start a thread over.

What is it called when a musician runs their fingers across the strings on a stringed instrument? Not actually playing, just getting a sound?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on June 09, 2017, 02:57:36 AM
I'm just going to keep taking advantage of your helpfulness, regarding grammar questions too minor to start a thread over.

What is it called when a musician runs their fingers across the strings on a stringed instrument? Not actually playing, just getting a sound?

I'm not sure there's a specific word/phrase for that? Warming up or tuning is the closest I can think of, but that deals with preparation, not merely playing for a sound.

If it was a sound you had to blow through, I'd say "you're just blowing to hear your sound." Though, this is a stringed instrument, of which I have no experience with.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on June 09, 2017, 03:11:14 AM
Maybe "strumming" is the word you are looking for. Means stroking the strings, playing a chord, just gently messing around with a guitar or similar.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 09, 2017, 11:21:21 AM
She plucked a few strings aimlessly
His fingers wandered over the strings
She fiddled a bit with the guitar (though is a little confusing without something more)

I sometimes use the word "noodled" for sort of messing about without much intention or plan. "He noodled a bit on the guitar, trying out different chords and arpeggios without much of a plan. It relaxed him. His unconscious mind was probably off actually solving this damn murder, but for now he could just enjoy the cool night and the view through his neighbor's bedroom window."

Um. I think I noodled a bit off topic there.  8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on June 10, 2017, 04:54:29 AM
I'm just going to keep taking advantage of your helpfulness, regarding grammar questions too minor to start a thread over.

What is it called when a musician runs their fingers across the strings on a stringed instrument? Not actually playing, just getting a sound?

I'm not sure there's a specific word/phrase for that? Warming up or tuning is the closest I can think of, but that deals with preparation, not merely playing for a sound.

If it was a sound you had to blow through, I'd say "you're just blowing to hear your sound." Though, this is a stringed instrument, of which I have no experience with.
Searching Wikipedia's Violin Technique and Guitar Technique listings, I found drag, scratch, finger, and slide, which most closely describe the action you mention. Others include pluck, strum,  strike, and tap.

ETA: And because I am a writer, I am comfortable repurposing "slip" for this purpose.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Doctor_Chill on June 10, 2017, 05:04:39 AM
I'm just going to keep taking advantage of your helpfulness, regarding grammar questions too minor to start a thread over.

What is it called when a musician runs their fingers across the strings on a stringed instrument? Not actually playing, just getting a sound?

I'm not sure there's a specific word/phrase for that? Warming up or tuning is the closest I can think of, but that deals with preparation, not merely playing for a sound.

If it was a sound you had to blow through, I'd say "you're just blowing to hear your sound." Though, this is a stringed instrument, of which I have no experience with.
Searching Wikipedia's Violin Technique and Guitar Technique listings, I found drag, scratch, finger, and slide, which most closely describe the action you mention. Others include pluck, strum,  strike, and tap.

ETA: And because I am a writer, I am comfortable repurposing "slip" for this purpose.

I'd say pluck and strum are the most apt, yeah.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on June 10, 2017, 04:47:50 PM
Ooh, slip got me to a good phrase, @Eli_Freysson   

He slid his fingers lightly over the strings and absently plucked a note or two.

Or better,

His fingers wandered over the strings and absently plucked a note or two.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on June 11, 2017, 05:01:13 PM
Or
Quote
His fingers wandered over the strings and occasionally strummed a chord or two.
Though actually fingering the fret board is nearly more important than the actual strumming or plucking, which on their own only give a sense of time, of rhythm.
so maybe
Quote
He fingered the fret and occasionally strummed a few chords 
I think many guitarists only need to strum or pluck when they have decided on the fingering. Compare how an Autoharp works.
OTH an actual harp or fretless zither  (no separate fingering) might be casually plucked, I've never seen a harp "strummed". A fretted zither, guitar, lute, autoharp, violin etc needs to be fingered as well as plucked or strummed.
 
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on June 13, 2017, 07:41:39 AM
Deleted sorry @Eclipse didn't think of it that way. My apologies
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on June 13, 2017, 07:55:53 AM
Please don't spread politics across the boards, stick to politic thread please if you want to talk about it, I have thought of leaving this place because  of it.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on July 01, 2017, 05:00:37 PM
Say, I have yet another question. This one, appropriately enough, about question marks.

Should a sarcastic remark along the lines of "My, you're clever aren't you?" and sentences like "Can I just say that I hate this?" end in question marks?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on July 01, 2017, 05:35:00 PM
Yes. The question mark is a grammatical notation that doesn't always align with tone the way one might expect. This carries over into two-clause sentences, such as "I have been meaning to ask, where did you find those books?"
For my part, when the tone and the notation don't match, I shift when it's feasible. So if I want the sentence to come across as a statement and not a question (rhetorical or otherwise), instead of "Can I just say I hate this?" I would write "My, you are clever," and "Let me just say I hate this."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: tebakutis on July 01, 2017, 07:37:33 PM
Say, I have yet another question. This one, appropriately enough, about question marks.

Should a sarcastic remark along the lines of "My, you're clever aren't you?" and sentences like "Can I just say that I hate this?" end in question marks?

Yes. I've used that trick several times in writing, mainly because, in my head, it pitches the sentence up at the end, like someone asking a question that is really a statement (and eliciting agreement). So something like...

Quote
Why would he tell me that if it wasn't true? (flat)

Maybe because he's a crazy person? (question, but more of a statement)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on July 12, 2017, 03:24:40 PM
Hey. It's me again.

How would one describe the sound of multiple footsteps? I have a character with ringing ears and the line is basically "It took him a few seconds to recognise the X noise as that of multiple running feet".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on July 13, 2017, 06:10:19 AM
Footsteps have rhythm, tone from the hardness and hollowness of the sole and the ground, and are affected by surface conditions (dry, wet, clean/clear, sandy, etc.). The surface sometimes makes as much noise, like a creaky wooden floor, the booming of steps in a stairwell, the crunch of leaves, etc. The weight on them will muffle, the space around them echo, and the other sounds in the air drown out. If people are trying to be quiet, that changes things too.

"It took him a few seconds to recognize the X noise as that of multiple running feet".
Solving for X: raspy, shuffling, clopping, flip-flap, flapping, slapping, shuffling, whispering, clanging, clicking, creaking, crunching, sloshing, squeaking, thudding, thundering, gravelly, crisp, hollow, clunking, thumping, clipped, galloping, and crashing.


Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on July 13, 2017, 07:13:35 AM

Eli--

It took him a moment to realize that that thunderous rumble was actually a stampede of overweight Americans fighting their way into Walmart for Black Friday.

Changing the subject--

So lets say hypothetically you get published in normal English by an American Publisher.  When they make arrangements with a British Publisher to try to sell your work internationally, does your book need to be translated into that funny way that British people speak?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on July 17, 2017, 08:52:06 PM
I've seen books from the UK receive the same treatment, so I'm assuming it happens in reverse as well.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Arry on July 17, 2017, 09:53:09 PM
So lets say hypothetically you get published in normal English by an American Publisher.  When they make arrangements with a British Publisher to try to sell your work internationally, does your book need to be translated into that funny way that British people speak?

It really depends on the publisher, and perhaps the specific book. Sometimes they do this, sometimes they don't. Neil Gaiman posted about all the error's the "translation" created by using search and replace in American Gods: http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2001/03/american-gods-blog-post-24.html
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on July 18, 2017, 02:24:37 AM

crazy-- they really do change everything! 
our languages are so different...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on July 21, 2017, 12:15:11 PM
I've got a "page a day" calendar with random stuff every day.
This is today's entry ;D

Quote
THINGS THAT HAVE BEEN DEEP-FRIED AT AMERICAN STATE FAIRS

Corn dog, bubblegum, pastrami pizza, jalapeño pimento cheese, butter, cheesecake, beer, brownie, jelly beans, ribs, pecan pie, bacon, salsa, club salad, peanut butter, pickle, margaritas, Pop Tarts, red velvet mini doughnuts, bacon-wrapped Tootsie Roll, s'mores, French-fry-coated hot dog, turkey, crab claws, pumpkin pie, pineapple upside-down cake, jambalaya, soda, kale, ice cream, candy bar, peanut butter and jelly sandwich, broccoli, bacon cinnamon roll, scorpion, chickpea fries, peanut butter banana cheeseburgers, corn fritters, pig ears, ice cream cheeseburger, banana wrapped in vanilla-wafer crumbs, alligator, and sugar cubes.

cheesecake!
jelly beans!
ice cream!
ice cream cheeseburger! (what is this, for goodness sake! who wants cheeseburger-flavoured ice cream??)
alligator!!
sugar cubes!
 :o :o :o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on July 21, 2017, 03:24:35 PM
They forgot deep-fried oreos. Yum yum!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on July 21, 2017, 04:08:56 PM
But... but... do americans really believe that things taste better if dunked in oil? :o
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on July 21, 2017, 05:23:20 PM
But... but... do americans really believe that things taste better if dunked in oil? :o
I love deep fried Snickers bars. But I know them from Scotland and not from the US.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on July 22, 2017, 02:12:05 AM
But... but... do americans really believe that things taste better if dunked in oil? :o
I love deep fried Snickers bars. But I know them from Scotland and not from the US.
And there you go. Deep- fried food is delicious!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on July 22, 2017, 03:25:45 AM
But... but... do americans really believe that things taste better if dunked in oil? :o
I love deep fried Snickers bars. But I know them from Scotland and not from the US.
And there you go. Deep- fried food is delicious!

Every Chinese restaurant had Deep Fried IceCream on the menu here once, but that was an 80's fad and I haven't seen it for a long time. It was good, a light batter and crumbs around a sphere of hard frozen ice cream.
And I'm fairly certain it was Scotland that invented deep fried Mars Bars even before they got to fry Snickers.  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on July 23, 2017, 06:02:39 PM
But... but... do americans really believe that things taste better if dunked in oil? :o

First off, yes.

Second, not really. The deep-fried foods at county fairs are more a thing for the novelty of trying it. Aside from corn dog, corn fritters, and broccoli (tempura), I've never seen any of the things on that list as part of a genuine meal.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on July 23, 2017, 11:17:22 PM
I would argue that the purpose of Hadrian's wall was to prevent the evil Scotti getting hold of Pizzas to deep fry.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on July 24, 2017, 07:55:06 AM
I would argue that the purpose of Hadrian's wall was to prevent the evil Scotti getting hold of Pizzas to deep fry.
;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ultamentkiller on July 24, 2017, 06:26:53 PM
Too late. There are these things called fried cheese sticks, which you dip in marinara sauce. So... It's pizza! Yum yum! Also, I feel like pizza rolls could qualify.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on July 24, 2017, 08:27:06 PM
Hey! Another English question!

When someone is addressed as "Mother" or "Father" by really old-timey, formal types, do these titles get capitalised?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on July 24, 2017, 08:33:11 PM
Hey! Another English question!

When someone is addressed as "Mother" or "Father" by really old-timey, formal types, do these titles get capitalised?

Yes, it has capitals when used as a title without possessives, as in:

"Father and Mother took me to the store."

This includes cases when it is used as a direct address, such as "How are you, Mother?"

With possessives, they are lowercase:

"My father and mother took me to the store."

or

"How is your mother?"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on July 29, 2017, 05:02:29 PM
"A tin knight"

anyone?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on July 29, 2017, 08:32:54 PM
"A tin knight"

anyone?

Context?
But I imagine it's the irony  ;D of armor made from a relatively weak metal.
Or, that tin soldiers are toys. So a tin knight is someone playing at chivalry or self importance.
Can't say for certain, but these make sense to me.
In any case, it's referencing someone who is not the knight they wish to seem.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on August 07, 2017, 09:26:39 AM

Is this an Aussie robot or a British robot?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSDhsF6vtAc

[Do we have video links back yet?]
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on August 14, 2017, 09:21:49 AM
Hey, I have another English language question. (Man, this thread is handy)

Which one of these is correct?

"Oh, I'll show you, all right."

"Oh, I'll show you, alright."

"Oh, I'll show you all right."

"Oh, I'll show you alright."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: tebakutis on August 14, 2017, 03:20:55 PM
Hey, I have another English language question. (Man, this thread is handy)

Which one of these is correct?

"Oh, I'll show you, all right."

"Oh, I'll show you, alright."

"Oh, I'll show you all right."

"Oh, I'll show you alright."

The first one is correct, as all right is typically two words (alright is slang you may see in less formal writing) and the commas are placed properly. Technically, the 3rd one is correct as well, but it looks sloppy without the extra comma, so you're better off with the first one. IMO!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lanko on August 14, 2017, 03:30:53 PM
I thought of the third one as an angry snap.

Something like:

"She lost her children, all her money and a leg. But she can still talk, she's all right."
Sarah closes her fists. "Oh, I will show you "all right".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 14, 2017, 03:56:35 PM
It depends on what you're trying to say, and where. Regarding where you use it, "Alright" is preferable in dialogue IMHO, but is incorrect anywhere else in formal writing.

Americans use "alright" in several ways, esp. in informal dialogue:
We use it to mean:
"For sure" or "definitely" with a negative connotation - "Oh, I'll show you, alright." (and you'll wish I hadn't)
"Ok, get off my back about it!" - "Ok, I'll show you. Alright?" (with comma or period between)
"Is that Ok?" - "Ok, I'll show you. Alright?" (with comma or period between) (tone difference is what separates it from the previous)

https://www.google.com/search?site=&source=hp&q=alright+vs+all+right&oq=alright+vs+&gs_l=psy-ab.3.0.0l4.625.3461.0.4804.12.11.0.0.0.0.664.1907.0j8j5-1.9.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..3.9.1901.0..35i39k1j0i131k1j0i20k1.znCKXyXS-l0
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on September 10, 2017, 10:52:49 PM
Hey guys. Yet another question.

I'm wondering how to describe a character holding his hand out, palm displayed, to indicate a direction. As in "follow me over there", or "walk ahead of me".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on September 10, 2017, 11:30:40 PM
If you use the verb 'to gesture' that usually implies part of body is used. If you wrote 'he gestured ahead'  you may not even need to add 'with his hand' as this is implied and will bring the image you described to mind. Hardly likely to use another body part to show the way.

ETA Just realised that last sentence may bring forth uncalled for comments from unruly characters here.  ::)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on September 11, 2017, 12:27:16 PM
If you use the verb 'to gesture' that usually implies part of body is used. If you wrote 'he gestured ahead'  you may not even need to add 'with his hand' as this is implied and will bring the image you described to mind. Hardly likely to use another body part to show the way.

ETA Just realised that last sentence may bring forth uncalled for comments from unruly characters here.  ::)

I have no idea what you could talking about, @Lady Ty!
She gestured toward the chair. Marty was looking at something else entirely on the princess, but they moved in he same direction as her hand so he finally realized she was asking him to sit down. Which might at that moment have been uncomfortable and... embarrassing.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on September 11, 2017, 12:47:18 PM
@Jmack, knew I could rely on someone to respond inappropriately and you have obliged with style. This sent my imagination flying and am now off to sleep with a good Oggy cackle.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on September 19, 2017, 11:02:16 PM
Hi. Guess who.

I've never had any reason to learn a lot of English technical terms, and I need a word to describe the function of futuristic powered armour. Specifically, I want to mention the sound of the... thing... in the suit that elevates the wearer's strength. That is, the things that do the lifting/punching instead of the wearer's muscles.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 20, 2017, 09:59:43 AM
I also have a question, because I've heard/seen both used.
Which is best (and brit)?

Do you 'see' a movie/series? Or do you 'watch' it?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on September 20, 2017, 10:08:06 AM
I watch a movie

I'm seeing a movie later

I don't use the word season for series.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on September 20, 2017, 10:28:06 AM
I watch a movie

I'm seeing a movie later

I don't use the word season for series.

Agree with watch and seeing as @Eclipse but there is a difference between a series and a season. A series can go on for years eg Big Bang Theory, but it is only available to buy and download, or on DVD, at intervals after a certain number of episodes are complete and it is off TV for a while.  Each of these collections of episodes are a Season. At present I have all available episodes of BBT series, ie up to Ninth Season. Waiting for Tenth to become available. Each season has 24 episodes.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on September 20, 2017, 05:58:55 PM

So this isn't British, American or even English (nor is it Portuguese) but @ScarletBea do you know if in Portuguese there's an abbreviation for PhD and MA?  I need it for my resume in Spanish, which hopefully would be similar, and there's not space to put "doctorado" and have everything fit on one line.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 20, 2017, 06:04:26 PM

So this isn't British, American or even English (nor is it Portuguese) but @ScarletBea do you know if in Portuguese there's an abbreviation for PhD and MA?  I need it for my resume in Spanish, which hopefully would be similar, and there's not space to put "doctorado" and have everything fit on one line.
You can use 'Doctor' or 'Dr.', but I'm not sure if it's the same in spanish...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on September 20, 2017, 09:29:45 PM

So this isn't British, American or even English (nor is it Portuguese) but @ScarletBea do you know if in Portuguese there's an abbreviation for PhD and MA?  I need it for my resume in Spanish, which hopefully would be similar, and there's not space to put "doctorado" and have everything fit on one line.

So this has nothing to do with your CV, but I think we should have a newdrink to improve one's intelligence:
"Doctorade"

And a brainstorm can be a "Doctornado"

And the city of golden professors? "El Doctorado"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on September 21, 2017, 07:03:59 AM
The thing is I know you can use it in a title (ie Dr. Darewood) but I don't know if you can use it under the "Education" section in the resume ("PhD in Anthropology, University of ..." might not be the same as "Dr en Anthropoligia, Universidad de...")
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 21, 2017, 12:10:39 PM
Right, I don't really know, sorry :-\
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lanko on September 28, 2017, 05:44:31 AM
Let's see if I can get some help with this. Been reading Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin and today I got to this part:

Quote
There is something guarded in his expression that was not there before, you notice distantly, through horror and wonder. Later, when you've had time to get past this, you and he will have to talk. Now there are more important considerations.

I already have enough trouble with has had, had had, and now there's a new one: have had.

With some research I discovered this is the form for Present perfect (which makes sense since the book is written in present tense).

Quote
The present perfect in English is used chiefly for completed past actions or events when it is understood that it is the present result of the events that is focused upon, rather than the moment of completion. No particular past time frame is specified for the action/event. When a past time frame (a point of time in the past, or period of time which ended in the past) is specified for the event, explicitly or implicitly, the simple past is used rather than the present perfect.

The tense may be said to be a sort of mixture of present and past. It always implies a strong connection with the present and is used chiefly in conversations, letters, newspapers and TV and radio reports.[1]

Quote
we use the present perfect tense to describe an event from the past that has some connection to the present.

Ok, but then I read that quote and "when you've had time" will happen "Later" and then "you and he will have to talk"... implying this will happen in the future.

Or maybe the "have had" is referring to "this". To simplify, "this" is the place they are currently "exploring", which causes the boy's reaction to change, so maybe then it's referring to their exploration, which began a few moments ago and is still going on, so I guess that would be the connection from an event to the past with one with the present? Or maybe the problem is with the "later" word?

Ergh. I read other books in present tense but this is the first time I stopped like this, and I don't remember seeing "have had" before, so either it's something rarely used (well, specially considering this passage is in second person present tense) or for whatever reason it didn't stop me before.

Someone explain why it was used there, please.

Also, would it be wrong if it was something like: "Later, when you'll have time, you and he will have to talk" or "Later, after getting through this, you and he will have to talk" or simply "Later you and he will have to talk"?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Yora on September 28, 2017, 06:11:10 AM
"Have had" also exist in German as "gehabt haben". It's not quite the same as "hatten". Not sure if old style guides permit it, but it's definitly something that shows up in German, and not extremely rare, I believe.

A typical sentence in German would be "Back when we've had horses, ..." But alternatively "Back when we still had horses, ..." The version "Back when we had horses, ...." would probably fly, but I think it sounds clunky.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on September 28, 2017, 08:10:37 AM


So so so sorry @Lanko. These English verbs are bastards, remember the dreaded has hads etc now  have had appears. ::) I'll try to help -

Quote
There is something guarded in his expression that was not there before, you notice distantly, through horror and wonder. Later, when you've had time to get past this, you and he will have to talk. Now there are more important considerations.

The have had is referring to all of time to get past this and it all becomes an action which still has to happen BUT will be in the past by the time "you and he will talk".

Not knowing context but assuming - some urgent practical action (such as escape or destroy something) you and he must carry out, before you have a heart to heart to help him get over his reaction to whatever has just caused his present horror and wonder.

Compare it with this same but more simple structure

When you have had the operation to remove your appendix, you and the surgeon will have to talk.

Quote
Also, would it be wrong if it was something like:

"Later, when you'll have time, you and he will have to talk"  or "Later, after getting through this, you and he will have to talk" or simply "Later you and he will have to talk"

Not wrong, all perfectly fine, because first sentence makes it clear that something pretty huge is happening. But "the time to get past it" does help stress there is an action of urgency or importance to be done first before the talk.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 28, 2017, 08:10:50 AM
Also, would it be wrong if it was something like: "Later, when you'll have time, you and he will have to talk" or "Later, after getting through this, you and he will have to talk" or simply "Later you and he will have to talk"?
I can't help with the technical aspects, it's been too long since I learnt and now it just comes automatically, but in this specific case your suggestion doesn't work because the narrator (not sure at what point you are and I don't want to give out a spoiler) is telling the story in the future.
So the situation is that "you've had time" means he knows what will happen, and it requires her to have time (despite what she thinks at that specific moment), with "will have to talk" simply meaning that the talk will happen sometime after the current situation.
The narrator is giving her time to consider.

Not wrong, all perfectly fine, because first sentence makes it clear that something pretty huge is happening. But "the time to get past it" does help stress there is an action of urgency or importance to be done first before the talk.
And this is also what I was trying to say ::) thanks, Lady Ty!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on September 28, 2017, 08:15:40 AM
Thanks ScarletBea, I don't know the context of that story so had to try and explain in the dark.  Hope it all helps Lanko sort it out . ;D

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on September 28, 2017, 11:32:54 AM
Hmm. My only comment on Bz's reading is that the narrator is describing the character's thoughts in the present of the narration, not (in this instance) a reflection based on future events. Yes, the narrator stands in the future, but describing the then present.

'Later, when you've had time to get over this, you'll have to talk."
The character, not the narrator, is thinking: "I have to get over this. And when I do, we're going to have to talk." But because the narrator is essentially telling the story to the POV character, the grammar changes. In the style of the book, the narrator never does "thought tags" (I.e. Thought bubble version of dialogue tags). The narrator doesn't say: "You're thinking, 'I need time to get over this, and after I do, we're going to need to talk.'" So without that structure, and with the fundamental structure as second person present, you get:

"Later (after the present moment), when you have had time (moving us to that future time and looking backward) to get over this, you will (in that future time) have to talk."

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on September 28, 2017, 01:00:25 PM
Thanks Jmack, that might describe it better.

This discussion is actually another of the reasons why I love Jemisin's books: the language is precise, and used in ways that we don't see regularly.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lanko on September 28, 2017, 08:39:24 PM
Thanks everyone that helped!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: RobertS on October 04, 2017, 08:12:34 PM
Quote
There is something guarded in his expression that was not there before, you notice distantly, through horror and wonder. Later, when you've had time to get past this, you and he will have to talk. Now there are more important considerations.

This has been said, but here is another flavor of explanation.

This expression indicates that the emotions and understanding of the event are too much to face at the moment. Often this expression or one like it is used by an adult to a child to indicate that it will never, ever be discussed again. It is also used when someone wants to say, "Let's talk, but not in front of these people," in a way that does not directly say to the people around that you don't want to include them in the conversation.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 03, 2017, 11:29:56 AM
"Behold my powers of necromancy, brought on by needing a particular word!"

Anyway, I'm writing a space battle scene, and boy is writing three-dimensional fighting tricky. A big ship is being attacked by multiple smaller ones. It mostly keeps stationary and merely spins to protect the aft thrusters. Then when the bad guys do get into position to target them, the big ship quickly moves in place so the underside (and all its guns) are facing the smaller ships.

What is the proper word to use for the move? Upend? Pitching forward? Let's keep in mind that there is no up or down in space.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on December 03, 2017, 12:16:57 PM
Read the first few Honor Harrington books by David Weber. Great fun, and great 3D space battles.

The ships in HH universe have a gravitational “wedge” as part of their propulsion and it is impenetrable in battle. So if a ship rolls to present its wedge then you can’t fire or you have to maneuver around it. Similarly, if you’re the ship the ship that has rolled its wedge, you can roll again to present your weapons to fire. Much strategy is when to do which, etc.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 03, 2017, 12:29:03 PM
Anyway, I'm writing a space battle scene, and boy is writing three-dimensional fighting tricky. A big ship is being attacked by multiple smaller ones. It mostly keeps stationary and merely spins to protect the aft thrusters. Then when the bad guys do get into position to target them, the big ship quickly moves in place so the underside (and all its guns) are facing the smaller ships.

What is the proper word to use for the move? Upend? Pitching forward? Let's keep in mind that there is no up or down in space.
Star Trek seemed to treat everything less 3D than Naval warfare, which has submarines and torpedoes since 19th C and aircraft since early 20th.

You can have "up and down" in a spiral galaxy, like our Milky way. Though which is up might be arbitrary, you could pick "top/up" based on spin of a galaxy, say regarding ALL as spinning "clockwise" and thus top is defined even for most globular galaxies. Then co-ordinates are confirmed by pulsars and would have an arbitrary zero degrees on disc, a +/- up down and a + out from centre. A ship would have degrees rotation on main axis and degree angle to plane of the galaxy or local star system if within say 25 light days of a star.
Each civilisation in a Galaxy might have zero go through own homeworld and a different decision on which is up. If you know that, their number of subdivisions of a circle and unit of interstellar distance, you can convert. How do you know? When you spy/steal a copy of a navigation database it will have the same pulsars.
One thing for sure, if there are ANY civilisations in any galaxy, they will use Pulsars as navigation beacons. The "gps" of the known universe. Already being used by us on internal Solar System navigation!
 
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on December 04, 2017, 03:58:59 AM
"Behold my powers of necromancy, brought on by needing a particular word!"

Anyway, I'm writing a space battle scene, and boy is writing three-dimensional fighting tricky. A big ship is being attacked by multiple smaller ones. It mostly keeps stationary and merely spins to protect the aft thrusters. Then when the bad guys do get into position to target them, the big ship quickly moves in place so the underside (and all its guns) are facing the smaller ships.

What is the proper word to use for the move? Upend? Pitching forward? Let's keep in mind that there is no up or down in space.

The short answer to your question: unlike 'turn', the verbs pivot, rotate, and spin connote turning in place without changing position. For example, in the new Battlestar Galactica series, the fighters would fly in one direction, pivot to bring their weapons to bear on their target, and strafe sideways.

Small suggestion: pick words for specific purposes and stick with them. Technical people, like pilots and ship captains, use specific terms to ensure their communications are clear. Hence starboard and port on ships; aft and forward; pitch, yaw, and roll in flight. Whatever you pick, be consistent.

When a ship pivots along its centerline, always facing the same way, that's rolling, but this is so often depicted while moving that it might be confusing. If it pivots horizontally, that's yaw, but that word is rarely used outside of aerospace. Pitch is changing your attitude by raising/lowering the nose.
So I advise these combinations:
- rolling clockwise while holding position
- rotating yawing, spinning, pivoting, or facing left or right
- pitching up/down

A bigger suggestion: devise a framework for describing such things and establish it with the reader BEFORE you get into the space battle, perhaps during a routine shuttle-docking sequence.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 04, 2017, 11:45:23 AM
… unlike 'turn', the verbs pivot, rotate, and spin connote turning in place without changing position. For example, in the new Battlestar Galactica series, the fighters would fly in one direction, pivot to bring their weapons to bear on their target, and strafe sideways.

… Hence starboard and port on ships; aft and forward; pitch, yaw, and roll in flight. Whatever you pick, be consistent.

When a ship pivots along its centerline, always facing the same way, that's rolling, but this is so often depicted while moving that it might be confusing. If it pivots horizontally, that's yaw, but that word is rarely used outside of aerospace. Pitch is changing your attitude by raising/lowering the nose.
So I advise these combinations:
- rolling clockwise while holding position
- rotating yawing, spinning, pivoting, or facing left or right
- pitching up/down

… devise a framework for describing such things and establish it with the reader BEFORE you get into the space battle, perhaps during a routine shuttle-docking sequence.
Also in space there is no friction and no ability to use surfaces. If you turn the original vector is unaffected and summed to new thrust. Every existing vector has to be cancelled by a sufficient duration thrust. Compared to hovercraft (bad) or missile (very bad), changing direction is complex and needs reverse thrust. A ship thus will continue in almost exactly the same direction no matter which of X Y Z axis you roll/rotate on.

Good advice from "The Gem Cutter", especially consistency and casual introduction of terms without info dump. Docking between two ships, or ship and station on different vectors, or different initial orbits are complex. Computer / autopilot with ability to manually abort would be normal for docking, at least to match vectors closely, including any axial rotation or tumbling of either object.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on December 05, 2017, 12:27:01 PM

So off the topic of spaceships...

Apparently Americans speak more like 17th century Englishmen than... Englishmen do.

http://the-toast.net/2014/03/19/a-linguist-explains-british-accents-of-yore/

also this video is referenced in the article and it's hillarious
https://youtu.be/WxB1gB6K-2A
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 19, 2017, 10:01:59 AM
Windscreen/windshield
--> which one is Brit and which American??
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 19, 2017, 10:25:45 AM
Pretty sure they are all windscreens in UK. Funny really, rainscreen would be more appropriate. But I think they had them before they had roofs in old cars, so yeah. ::)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 19, 2017, 10:26:03 AM
Windscreen for me
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 19, 2017, 10:26:54 AM
Is a fender the bumper?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 19, 2017, 10:33:27 AM
If so, do Americans also put one around a fireplace?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 19, 2017, 10:46:42 AM
Do there know what a roundabout,zebra crossing and a lollipop woman/man  is ?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 19, 2017, 10:49:02 AM
Thanks both!

Funny really, rainscreen would be more appropriate. But I think they had them before they had roofs in old cars, so yeah. ::)
I was thinking the same this morning, and how the portuguese word means "stop the breezes", if translated literally ;D

Do there know what a roundabout,zebra crossing and a lollipop woman/man  is ?
Zebra AND penguin crossings :D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 19, 2017, 11:11:39 AM
Ice cream vans? Where’s gemmy? We need to know!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 19, 2017, 12:48:52 PM
Do there know what a roundabout,zebra crossing and a lollipop woman/man  is ?
Pelican Crossings
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on December 19, 2017, 02:02:34 PM
Windscreen is Brit. Roundabouts in the US are traffic circles I think.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on December 19, 2017, 03:36:38 PM
I think America has adopted the roundabout (by whatever name) 20 odd years ago I was travelling with an American who screeched to a halt at one and nearly caused everyone behind to pile into us. He said something on the lines of "what is it and what do I do" after it was explained he remarked "why don't you use 4 way stops like normal people?"

To be fair he was coping with a manual (stick shift) and driving on the wrong side of the road so it may have been brain overload at that point.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on December 19, 2017, 07:22:26 PM
(http://autoliga.by/images/stories/bezopasnost/26.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 19, 2017, 09:07:35 PM
a lollipop woman/man
???
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 19, 2017, 09:19:27 PM
a lollipop woman/man
???
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/11/01/23/2E019A9900000578-0-Dangerously_cheerful_Lollipop_lady_Betty_Dickson_74_is_a_bright_-a-37_1446420902293.jpg (http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/11/01/23/2E019A9900000578-0-Dangerously_cheerful_Lollipop_lady_Betty_Dickson_74_is_a_bright_-a-37_1446420902293.jpg)

You don't want to search shutterstock in work. They have every kind of lollipop woman.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on December 19, 2017, 09:31:37 PM
(http://autoliga.by/images/stories/bezopasnost/26.jpg)
Ohmygawd, I just realise that there is NOT a penguin crossing :-[ :-[
There is Zebra, Pelican, Puffin, Toucan and Pegasus, but not penguin.... ooops!
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 19, 2017, 10:51:20 PM
I discovered a Pegasus crossing in London in 2010 and thought it was wonderful. This one was at Hyde Park Corner so maybe mostly for the police horses and guards horses. One of the best surprises I had was going to catch a train early one morning and seeing about twenty police horses being ridden in file of pairs down Marylebone Road maybe to go to exercise or on duty.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on December 20, 2017, 10:34:52 AM
a lollipop woman/man
???
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/11/01/23/2E019A9900000578-0-Dangerously_cheerful_Lollipop_lady_Betty_Dickson_74_is_a_bright_-a-37_1446420902293.jpg (http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/11/01/23/2E019A9900000578-0-Dangerously_cheerful_Lollipop_lady_Betty_Dickson_74_is_a_bright_-a-37_1446420902293.jpg)

You don't want to search shutterstock in work. They have every kind of lollipop woman.
Thanks! Now I'm curious...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on December 30, 2017, 11:59:24 AM
'kay, I have a couple questions:

I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength? My grasp of the English language does not extend to mechanical matters.

Also, should this sentence be:

"Such situations was where skill came in."

or

"Such situations were where skill came in."

(a character only survives a situation due to experience)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Lady Ty on December 30, 2017, 08:36:03 PM
Your sentence should read “Such situations were where skill came in.”  because  ‘situations’ are plural. ie he was, they were.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on December 31, 2017, 10:49:06 AM
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.

Of course, depending on the design, some other type of actuation could be used:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powered_exoskeleton#Actuators
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 31, 2017, 02:32:49 PM
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.

Of course, depending on the design, some other type of actuation could be used:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powered_exoskeleton#Actuators
Servo motors do not actually CONTROL movement. They do the movement. They are not used on ANY current powered suit or exoskeleton (both of which exist for medical and military applications). as they are very weak due to small size. Used for wing mirrors, model aircraft, engine throttles.  Servo motors have a built in feedback loop. Other movement systems may use sensors to a main CPU, or for mills and laser cutters, the stepper motors are used with only a limit stop.
Usually fluid or steam operated pistons are used. The power is varied with valves and pumps (or Hydrogen peroxide feeds to create high pressure steam). Stepper motors and DC servo due to intrinsic physics would never suit powered armour. Superconductors won't fix it.

Actual suit control would be by sensing existing muscles, existing nerves, a special glove or eye movement detection camera.

Best to not explain it and avoid detail.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on December 31, 2017, 06:30:35 PM
Windscreen/windshield
--> which one is Brit and which American??

We use windshield in the US.

Is a fender the bumper?

I would have assumed so because of the term "fender bender," I always thought it referenced the bumper. Apparently not.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-fender-and-a-bumper (https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-fender-and-a-bumper)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on December 31, 2017, 07:50:01 PM
I have a character wearing futuristic powered armour. What does one call the parts of it that control movement and grant superhuman strength?
My answer would be: Servomotors.
They are not used on ANY current powered suit or exoskeleton...
That may very well be true.
But the question was about a futuristic powered armour. IMO, fluid operated pistons are lot less futuristic.

Servo motors do not actually CONTROL movement. They do the movement.
Well, half of the question was about the actuation. And...
Servo motors have a built in feedback loop.
Yes. There is position feedback, which is used for what? Control.
But sure, you need other sensors and microcontrollers/CPUs for suit/armour control.

Stepper motors and DC servo due to intrinsic physics would never suit powered armour.
Wouldn't know, what with my limited knowledge. But the term "servomotor" doesn't specify the type of motor, so, in a futuristic setting, a new type of motor (and/or gear system) could be used in powered armour. At least to me, it wouldn't be too far-fetched.


But yeah. Wouldn't know.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on January 07, 2018, 02:48:05 PM

That may very well be true.
But the question was about a futuristic powered armour. IMO, fluid operated pistons are lot less futuristic.


Unless it's basically a fairystory, or fantasy like Marvel you can't break the laws of physics. The future will not make electric motors replace hydraulic or gas powered actuators.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on January 08, 2018, 02:39:12 PM
Unless it's basically a fairystory, or fantasy like Marvel you can't break the laws of physics.
I never suggested breaking the laws of physics. I guess I just have more hope (perhaps misplaced hope?) for technological advancement.

The future will not make electric motors replace hydraulic or gas powered actuators.
Most likely not in all uses.
Can't really say I share your certitude in this matter, though. But since we don't have a time machine, there's really no point in arguing.


But as you said, best not to go into too many details about this stuff.
I hope this has helped Eli to make a decision that works for his story.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on January 08, 2018, 02:48:09 PM
psst @ArcaneArtsVelho, this discussion has been moved here (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?topic=11166.0) ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ArcaneArtsVelho on January 08, 2018, 03:57:22 PM
psst @ArcaneArtsVelho, this discussion has been moved here (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?topic=11166.0) ;)
Yes, yes. Apologies.  :)

Though I feel that that thread has slightly different spin to it compared to this discussion.

But either way, I'm done.  ;)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on January 21, 2018, 06:48:12 PM
Hi, it's the Nordic guy again with a grammar question:

I have a spaceship flying parallel to another one, but lagging a bit behind. Is the word for that still "parallel"?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: tebakutis on January 21, 2018, 07:04:06 PM
Hi, it's the Nordic guy again with a grammar question:

I have a spaceship flying parallel to another one, but lagging a bit behind. Is the word for that still "parallel"?

Seems reasonable to say yes. If you consider their flight routes/direction, they remain parallel, so that seems correct to me.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on January 21, 2018, 09:22:10 PM
Tandem? Why not just say trailing?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on January 22, 2018, 05:23:44 PM
Tandem suggests directly behind. Which is a seriously bad idea with any normal space reaction drive.
A terminal idea with some kinds of drive even at a serious distance.  :D
Parallel is really really a good idea, you don't have to be "level".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on January 30, 2018, 04:04:38 PM
Okay, I want to clear something up about capitalising titles.

I'm specifically thinking of two groups in my setting: A warrior class known as Skull Warriors, and Royal Knights.

As I understand it I should capitalise the title when referring to either group as a whole, or when it's being put in front of someone's name ("Knight James"). But what about when referring to a particular individual? Like, say, "The Warrior looked up"?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on January 30, 2018, 04:15:35 PM
When it's a general term:  'The dukes of England'  'The warriors of Eastmark' then it's lower case. You wouldn't say 'the Policeman looked up'.

 If it was the 'Duke of Eastmark' then it would replace a proper name and should be upper case, as you said. 
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on February 06, 2018, 08:08:04 PM
Is there an English word that described a plain that is partly sandy, partly grass, like this?

(https://www.lvisberg.ch/events/iceland2004/iceland_2004_0125.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on February 06, 2018, 09:05:28 PM
Not in American English, that I know of.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on February 06, 2018, 10:36:46 PM

Hmmmm, desert grassland? dry savannah?  shrubland? semi-arid plains?

I used to work in the Sahel, which had places like that, but they just called it... the Sahel.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on February 06, 2018, 10:59:52 PM
Not exact but best i can think of

semiarid https://sciencing.com/semiarid-climate-10009421.html (https://sciencing.com/semiarid-climate-10009421.html)

tundra https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tundra (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tundra)

Edit and Bradley has mentioned semi-arid above
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on February 06, 2018, 11:34:57 PM
Tundra?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: The Gem Cutter on February 07, 2018, 01:56:43 AM
grassland, prairie, flatland, lowland, pasture, scrubland, meadowland, savanna, steppe; tableland, tundra, pampas, veld, wasteland, wastes, wilderness, wilds, barren land; dust bowl

Given the usage, a flat land of spotty grass, I would go with wasteland, wilderness, or barrens. In my opinion, if a distinction is important to the writer, even if it's not readily obvious why it's important to the work, then it is important to the work, so you might consider describing it fully. "A flat wilderness of much sand, little grass, and no trees."
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on February 08, 2018, 10:23:45 AM
Not in American English, that I know of.

grassland, prairie, flatland, lowland, pasture, scrubland, meadowland, savanna, steppe; tableland, tundra, pampas, veld, wasteland, wastes, wilderness, wilds, barren land; dust bowl

Given the usage, a flat land of spotty grass, I would go with wasteland, wilderness, or barrens. In my opinion, if a distinction is important to the writer, even if it's not readily obvious why it's important to the work, then it is important to the work, so you might consider describing it fully. "A flat wilderness of much sand, little grass, and no trees."

 ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on February 08, 2018, 10:27:25 AM
Yes, but the thing is that all those words don't have sand, and Eli did say about it being part sand...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on February 08, 2018, 10:32:41 AM
Yes, but the thing is that all those words don't have sand, and Eli did say about it being part sand...

Maybe instead of a grassland it's a grass-sand
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on February 08, 2018, 02:05:11 PM
I wasn't expecting this many replied, but I've decided to go with "scrubland".
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on May 01, 2018, 02:39:23 AM
What's a "pantser"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 01, 2018, 12:24:42 PM
What's a "pantser"
Those that don't plan anything - "live by the seat of their pants" ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on May 02, 2018, 09:02:14 AM
the word for that in the US is "normal"
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on May 02, 2018, 12:40:12 PM
the word for that in the US is "normal"
:-[ stand back, weirdo!
 ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on May 15, 2018, 08:12:40 PM
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786)

Yorkshire pudding is basically baked pancake mix. It was made to soak up gravy and make up for the lack of Beef in your Sunday dinner. In England as a whole it is eaten with a roast beef dinner on the same plate traditionally on a Sunday. In North Yorkshire it is eaten with gravy or dripping (meat juices and fat that cook out when you roast your beef joint) before you get your roast dinner.

Nothing wrong with the idea of them as a dessert beyond they are not eaten in the UK that way. After all we struggle with the idea of pancakes with bacon for breakfast.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on May 15, 2018, 10:41:47 PM
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786 (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786)

Yorkshire pudding is basically baked pancake mix. It was made to soak up gravy and make up for the lack of Beef in your Sunday dinner. In England as a whole it is eaten with a roast beef dinner on the same plate traditionally on a Sunday. In North Yorkshire it is eaten with gravy or dripping (meat juices and fat that cook out when you roast your beef joint) before you get your roast dinner.

Nothing wrong with the idea of them as a dessert beyond they are not eaten in the UK that way. After all we struggle with the idea of pancakes with bacon for breakfast.
I never used them as a dessert (my mother made great yorkshire pudding), but I saw Nigella Lawson do it on one of her shows. She made it then put cream and syrup on it and ate it as a dessert.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on May 16, 2018, 01:25:49 AM
Gross
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on June 25, 2018, 06:28:27 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAGcDi0DRtU
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on June 27, 2018, 02:39:32 PM
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.

Is there any historical reason?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: CameronJohnston on June 27, 2018, 03:00:35 PM
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.

Is there any historical reason?

I suppose it's all down to the legacy of imperial measurements and coinage, which did not easily translate to neat metric percentages and was better represented by fractions.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on August 01, 2018, 11:53:56 AM
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?
Is there any historical reason?

Betting odds?
Mixing ratios for everything from mortar to cooking.

Also percentages are not intuitive, 16.7% vs a 1/6th of a pizza?

It's not exactly about currency or imperial. Though USA uses quarter and two bits, influenced from Doubloon, which could be split in 8, 1/4 = 2bits. Pieces of Eight.

Why is USA almost only country in world using Imperial (though USA pints & Gallons are not same as imperial?), only one other small country does. Metric was a German idea proposed by Gauss in 1832, adopted by the French and developed more by British Scientists in 1874.
A Mars probe was lost by NASA due to an Imperial / Metric mixup.

Why does USA use Fahrenheit? Only used by USA. Proposed about same time as Centigrade.
Celsius (called Centigrade till 1948) was proposed in 1722 and adopted in 1724.

Percentages are a decimal fraction multiplied by 100. They are useful for science, mathematics etc, but ratios of whole numbers are easier to visualise.

I think the UK & Irish media do often use percentages when appropriate. Like percentage in Votes for Brexit, Poll support for various people vs Theresa May as PM. Support for Scottish independence or Irish re-unification.  People with Fibre broadband or copper phone line (though it may actually be Aluminium).
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on August 01, 2018, 12:53:06 PM
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.
I can use percentages, but I prefer not to. It just sounds better to say "1 out of 5," for example.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eclipse on October 07, 2018, 08:06:31 AM
How many accents are there in just one U.S state?

In the UK we have quite a lot of accents in a small land mass. You can go 30 miles down the road and people will have different slang terms and dialects.

Now I’m interested in how many accents do Icelanders have?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on October 07, 2018, 07:38:27 PM
In the UK we have quite a lot of accents in a small land mass. You can go 30 miles down the road and people will have different slang terms and dialects.
Same here in Germany. Most are dying out, though.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on October 07, 2018, 08:26:45 PM
I just watched Doctor Who (my first ever!!!) and I was reading the comments: so many people commenting on her Yorkshire accent, for me it was just the normal way of speaking around me ;D

(she's from my town, SO proud :D)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Skip on October 07, 2018, 08:31:14 PM
I wasn't expecting this many replied, but I've decided to go with "scrubland".

Belated, and you've already decided, but I would put forward "heath" as the right term. Take a look at the Wikipedia article and the associated pics.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heath
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on October 07, 2018, 09:41:26 PM
I just watched Doctor Who (my first ever!!!) and I was reading the comments: so many people commenting on her Yorkshire accent, for me it was just the normal way of speaking around me ;D

(she's from my town, SO proud :D)
When New Who started in 2005 and Ecclestone had a northern accent, Billy Piper as Rose commented on it and the Doctor said 'Well, everywhere has a north.'
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2018, 08:33:55 AM
British people don't have pants???
Our pants are worn under trousers ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 09, 2018, 08:55:40 AM

 ???

Wait how do you fit pants underneath your pants? Aren't trousers underwear anyway? This is why I can never follow when English people speak to each other...
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on November 09, 2018, 10:57:44 AM
British people don't have pants???
Our pants are worn under trousers ;D
Not to mention unmentionables.  8)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2018, 12:43:26 PM
Quote
Wait how do you fit pants underneath your pants? Aren't trousers underwear anyway? This is why I can never follow when English people speak to each other...

Ah my friend let me assist in your linguistic dilemma. America is well known for it's crimes against grammar and its misconceptions of the English language. Let me assure you that no gentleman is seen in his pants in public. pants being underwear. Underwear is worn next to the skin and is not displayed publicly. What you mistakenly call pants are actually trousers and are described as 'a pair of' like socks and shoes.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: DrNefario on November 09, 2018, 01:19:32 PM
I kind of feel that US-English is more in the right on this one.

In British English, pants is an abbreviation of underpants, but surely the name underpants implies that they* are garments that go under pants?


*And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on November 09, 2018, 01:51:10 PM
*And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.
Although the people "in fashion" use singular: "that's such a lovely shoe", "you need a trouser to go with that" ::)

(yes, I watch Project Runway...)

And talk about deviation from the thread theme ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 09, 2018, 04:36:17 PM
Quote
In British English, pants is an abbreviation of underpants, but surely the name underpants implies that they* are garments that go under pants?

British English! Gods damn you sir there is only the Queens English anything else is a foul invention of Microsoft. If you choose to wear such outmoded garments as pantaloons that is your choice, but do not expect anyone to take you seriously.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 10, 2018, 12:37:25 AM
Down here pants are the outside garment, as are trousers or strides. Underpants are undies or underdaks, not to be confused with trakkies or trakky daks, which are what I think Americans refer to as sweatpants.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Justan Henner on November 12, 2018, 06:38:27 PM
trakky daks

 ;D

Australian is the best English.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on November 17, 2018, 09:58:15 PM
And let's not get started on the fact that pants and trousers are both plural for some reason.
Originally leg coverings where not sewn together at the front and back of the bum/torso. Hose (for men or women) were separate legs, often footless and hung from the waist over the top of the smalls.
In some periods of time the sleeves also might not be stitched into the body garment (bodice, dress, blouse, shirt etc) but lace on.
A "dress" or "gown" wasn't originally a one piece female garment that was modest enough to be worn on it's own, but part of a description of many items of clothing. "Gown" seems to have been any kind of full length garment, as survives in Ballgown, dressing gown and hospital gown.
A "dressing gown" seems a strange name compared to a "night gown" (rare on men now).
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on November 18, 2018, 01:02:34 AM
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 18, 2018, 12:10:36 PM
If anyone from the UK refers to pants it will be an abbreviation of underpants or they are talking to an American and ensuring there is no confusion brought about by the forked use of English in this matter. If you have read English authors using Americanisms it is because English is translated across the pond (one way only) as Americans are apparently put off by English terms. Ben Aaronovitch  has a blog post about this covering dominant language theory.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 18, 2018, 08:40:29 PM
If anyone from the UK refers to pants it will be an abbreviation of underpants or they are talking to an American and ensuring there is no confusion brought about by the forked use of English in this matter. If you have read English authors using Americanisms it is because English is translated across the pond (one way only) as Americans are apparently put off by English terms. Ben Aaronovitch  has a blog post about this covering dominant language theory.
Was the Aaronovitch article brought about by the US editions of the Peter Grant books changing football to soccer?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on November 19, 2018, 12:19:16 AM
Quote
Was the Aaronovitch article brought about by the US editions of the Peter Grant books changing football to soccer?

yes it was and titled something like Lesley plays soccer on the sidewalk and it is buried deep in the Temporarily Significant blog.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on November 19, 2018, 01:56:36 AM
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Elfy on November 19, 2018, 04:15:40 AM
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.
Just call them daks and you'll be okay. Don't call them underdaks, though. I think the Scots use the word trousers for underpants, it seems that way from the song 'Donald, Where's Your Trousers?' by Andy Stewart.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on November 19, 2018, 04:33:35 AM
Some British people say pants for trousers. The word underpants comes from pants which comes from pantaloons.

Okay wait are trousers underpants?
Are pantaloons underpants?
I'M SO CONFUSED.
No, underpants are under pantaloons.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on November 22, 2018, 09:31:08 PM
Some British people say pants for trousers.
Never heard anyone other than Americans call trousers, pants.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on November 22, 2018, 10:14:45 PM
Some British people say pants for trousers.
Never heard anyone other than Americans call trousers, pants.
I have, although I can't remember where or when. It's been a while since I've lived in the UK. I've also heard people say truck for lorry.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on November 22, 2018, 11:05:51 PM
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: JMack on December 01, 2018, 01:01:16 AM
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

Pretty much never.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on December 01, 2018, 09:58:04 AM
American is taking over...
I saw the local supermarket advertise an offer on 'Chips'. They are CRISPS. Even says so on the packet.
Chips are the deep fat fried chips of potato.
"French Fries" are the fake too skinny chips sold in Fast Food Franchises, usually controlled by parasitic international companies. Franchise means the owner puts up all the money, pays the rent but is only a "minder". The Franchise dictates suppliers, menu, style, everything. Some leading french fries have a special coating to encourage eating and drinking more. Real chips have no coating.
I'm in Ireland. More people use Polish and Chinese than Irish. We mostly use 'British English' but with big variations between Belfast (in UK), Derry (in UK also called Slash City Derry/Londonderry)) Dublin (Ireland but nicknamed Western Britain), Cork, Limerick and Galway. That's the five biggest cities on the Island. Rural Kerry, Donegal, Clare, Wexford etc very different.

It's very evident on the UK & Irish Media, aided by Netflix (a loss making parasite), US TV, US Cinema and (anti-) Social Media is rapidly becoming American in spelling, vocabulary and style.
Perhaps in 25 years all English speakers will only be using American.

The Evil of American Format Dates:
My Computer has a creeping Americanization, the Email program is displaying all dates in the foolish MM DD YYYY format. ISO YYYY MM DD is best for sorting. Non-American format is DD MM YYYY, a logical ascending format.

Recipes on the Internet (Food or Wool) and stupid cups
Is it American or British Imperial?  What size is a cup! The standard UK imperial measure* is hardly used now and doesn't apply to ANYTHING other than baking. There seems to be various US standard "cups" for various purposes. Also a Japanese one.
Also don't Americans have weighing scales for Yarn or non-liquid ingredients? We have had cheap dial type since 1950s with grams and also UK pounds & ounces. For nearly 20 years the digital ones have been cheap and have a button for grams and also UK pounds & ounces, also to zero out weight of empty bowl.

* In the United Kingdom the standard cup was set at 10 imperial fluid ounces, or half an imperial pint. The cup was rarely used in practice, as historically most kitchens tended to be equipped with scales and ingredients were measured by weight, rather than volume.  (There are also UK teaspoons = 5ml, UK tablespoon = 15ml).
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(unit) and also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measuring_spoon to see why it's SO STUPID to post recipes on the Internet using cups,  tablespoons or teaspoons. Non-liquid should NEVER use cups, tablespoons or teaspoons.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: J.R. Darewood on December 02, 2018, 05:23:02 AM
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

@NedMarcus It's typically used when speaking to children.

Eg.  "Dinner is ready.  Turn off fortnite and come eat."  @Lady Ty  is actually an expert at this particular usage.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: NedMarcus on December 02, 2018, 07:43:43 AM
Is the word fortnight used at all in the North America (USA or Canada)? I often say fortnight and use it in my writing.

@NedMarcus It's typically used when speaking to children.

Eg.  "Dinner is ready.  Turn off fortnite and come eat."  @Lady Ty  is actually an expert at this particular usage.
I actually have no idea what you've just said  ???
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Alex on February 13, 2019, 11:19:39 AM

Never heard anyone other than Americans call trousers, pants.

Unless of course they're sweatpants or something of that ilk.  ;D
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on February 27, 2019, 07:32:41 AM
Say, does the empty space in a stairwell have a name? I'm writing a firefight between people at the top and the bottom.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6f/Jyvaskyla_tower_stairs.jpg/220px-Jyvaskyla_tower_stairs.jpg)
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on February 27, 2019, 08:16:56 AM
I'll let a native confirm, but I think that empty space *is* the stairwell - the rest are simply stairs.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Eli_Freysson on February 28, 2019, 08:26:55 PM
I'll let a native confirm, but I think that empty space *is* the stairwell - the rest are simply stairs.

And would someone care to confirm? Hello? Hello? Testing? Testing?
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Rostum on February 28, 2019, 11:35:14 PM
A stairwell is a vertical shaft containing (strangely enough) multiple staircases.

Not really used in architecture before the early 20th century and relied upon in tower blocks.

Best to be at the top in a firefight and assuming its pistols my inclination would be to lie flat away from the railings  and the top step on one of the landings and shoot anyone who emerges.
If I was starting at the bottom better to control the exits than chase up a very risky proposition.

You are going to wind up deaf from being in an enclosed space and shooting ricochets are also an issue.

Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: Ray McCarthy on March 16, 2019, 10:40:02 AM
And would someone care to confirm? Hello? Hello? Testing? Testing?
A stairwell is the space in the middle.
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: ScarletBea on April 15, 2019, 03:44:27 PM
Through a couple of TV series I've come to realise that in the US, paramedics/ambulances aren't linked with Hospitals, they're linked with firefighters instead??
That doesn't make much sense, does it??
Title: Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
Post by: xiagan on April 16, 2019, 08:23:36 PM
Through a couple of TV series I've come to realise that in the US, paramedics/ambulances aren't linked with Hospitals, they're linked with firefighters instead??
That doesn't make much sense, does it??
In Germany you call the firefighters too, when you need an ambulance. At least here in Berlin, I don't remember this from other parts of Germany I've lived in...