May 26, 2019, 04:24:19 AM

Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 67084 times)

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #615 on: May 02, 2018, 12:40:12 PM »
the word for that in the US is "normal"
:-[ stand back, weirdo!
 ;D
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Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #616 on: May 15, 2018, 08:12:40 PM »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786

Yorkshire pudding is basically baked pancake mix. It was made to soak up gravy and make up for the lack of Beef in your Sunday dinner. In England as a whole it is eaten with a roast beef dinner on the same plate traditionally on a Sunday. In North Yorkshire it is eaten with gravy or dripping (meat juices and fat that cook out when you roast your beef joint) before you get your roast dinner.

Nothing wrong with the idea of them as a dessert beyond they are not eaten in the UK that way. After all we struggle with the idea of pancakes with bacon for breakfast.

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #617 on: May 15, 2018, 10:41:47 PM »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44123786

Yorkshire pudding is basically baked pancake mix. It was made to soak up gravy and make up for the lack of Beef in your Sunday dinner. In England as a whole it is eaten with a roast beef dinner on the same plate traditionally on a Sunday. In North Yorkshire it is eaten with gravy or dripping (meat juices and fat that cook out when you roast your beef joint) before you get your roast dinner.

Nothing wrong with the idea of them as a dessert beyond they are not eaten in the UK that way. After all we struggle with the idea of pancakes with bacon for breakfast.
I never used them as a dessert (my mother made great yorkshire pudding), but I saw Nigella Lawson do it on one of her shows. She made it then put cream and syrup on it and ate it as a dessert.
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Offline J.R. Darewood

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #618 on: May 16, 2018, 01:25:49 AM »
Gross

Offline J.R. Darewood

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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #620 on: June 27, 2018, 02:39:32 PM »
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.

Is there any historical reason?
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Offline CameronJohnston

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #621 on: June 27, 2018, 03:00:35 PM »
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.

Is there any historical reason?

I suppose it's all down to the legacy of imperial measurements and coinage, which did not easily translate to neat metric percentages and was better represented by fractions.

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Offline Ray McCarthy

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #622 on: August 01, 2018, 11:53:56 AM »
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?
Is there any historical reason?

Betting odds?
Mixing ratios for everything from mortar to cooking.

Also percentages are not intuitive, 16.7% vs a 1/6th of a pizza?

It's not exactly about currency or imperial. Though USA uses quarter and two bits, influenced from Doubloon, which could be split in 8, 1/4 = 2bits. Pieces of Eight.

Why is USA almost only country in world using Imperial (though USA pints & Gallons are not same as imperial?), only one other small country does. Metric was a German idea proposed by Gauss in 1832, adopted by the French and developed more by British Scientists in 1874.
A Mars probe was lost by NASA due to an Imperial / Metric mixup.

Why does USA use Fahrenheit? Only used by USA. Proposed about same time as Centigrade.
Celsius (called Centigrade till 1948) was proposed in 1722 and adopted in 1724.

Percentages are a decimal fraction multiplied by 100. They are useful for science, mathematics etc, but ratios of whole numbers are easier to visualise.

I think the UK & Irish media do often use percentages when appropriate. Like percentage in Votes for Brexit, Poll support for various people vs Theresa May as PM. Support for Scottish independence or Irish re-unification.  People with Fibre broadband or copper phone line (though it may actually be Aluminium).
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 11:58:06 AM by Ray McCarthy »

Offline NedMarcus

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #623 on: August 01, 2018, 12:53:06 PM »
Why can't/don't Brits use percentages?

I always find so strange when people use "1 out of 5", "3 out of 12", "50p to the pound" in news and reports, instead of simply using 20%, 25%, 50%, which makes a lot more sense and is so much easier to understand.
I can use percentages, but I prefer not to. It just sounds better to say "1 out of 5," for example.

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #624 on: October 07, 2018, 08:06:31 AM »
How many accents are there in just one U.S state?

In the UK we have quite a lot of accents in a small land mass. You can go 30 miles down the road and people will have different slang terms and dialects.

Now I’m interested in how many accents do Icelanders have?
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Offline xiagan

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #625 on: October 07, 2018, 07:38:27 PM »
In the UK we have quite a lot of accents in a small land mass. You can go 30 miles down the road and people will have different slang terms and dialects.
Same here in Germany. Most are dying out, though.
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #626 on: October 07, 2018, 08:26:45 PM »
I just watched Doctor Who (my first ever!!!) and I was reading the comments: so many people commenting on her Yorkshire accent, for me it was just the normal way of speaking around me ;D

(she's from my town, SO proud :D)
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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #627 on: October 07, 2018, 08:31:14 PM »
I wasn't expecting this many replied, but I've decided to go with "scrubland".

Belated, and you've already decided, but I would put forward "heath" as the right term. Take a look at the Wikipedia article and the associated pics.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heath
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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #628 on: October 07, 2018, 09:41:26 PM »
I just watched Doctor Who (my first ever!!!) and I was reading the comments: so many people commenting on her Yorkshire accent, for me it was just the normal way of speaking around me ;D

(she's from my town, SO proud :D)
When New Who started in 2005 and Ecclestone had a northern accent, Billy Piper as Rose commented on it and the Doctor said 'Well, everywhere has a north.'

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #629 on: November 09, 2018, 08:33:55 AM »
British people don't have pants???
Our pants are worn under trousers ;D
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