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Author Topic: Ask a Brit/American what this means  (Read 73987 times)

Offline xiagan

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2015, 04:45:53 PM »
Only slightly related:
Jelly/Jello(?) hit with a tennis racket: http://i.imgur.com/VwYYyPA.webm

As a German, I'm amused by what you (means: all other countries) classify as bread. ;)
"Sire, I had no need of that hypothesis." (Laplace)

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2015, 05:15:26 PM »
Germans have got an unhealthy obsession with Bread  ;D

Brits used to moan at Germans for putting beach towel on sunbeds next to the hotel  swimming pool when there went on Holidays, I was never interest in sitting by the pool myself would rather explore
« Last Edit: November 09, 2015, 05:19:19 PM by Eclipse »
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2015, 05:21:36 PM »
I am happy to report that I can still spell favorite correctly.

You are still spelling it wrong  ;)
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Hedin

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #48 on: November 09, 2015, 05:24:42 PM »
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).

Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2015, 05:36:11 PM »
Quote
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).

As an American I would use pound. Quid probably comes from the latin expression Quid Pro Quo.
To confuse things In Scotland (pay attention @Saraband) £1 may be referred to as a Maggie after the pound coins replaced notes. Small thick and brassy and introduced by Scotlands least favorite Englishwoman.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2015, 06:01:14 PM by Rostum »

Offline Raptori

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #50 on: November 09, 2015, 06:13:27 PM »
Oat biscuits? Are those like... Normal biscuits?
I've honestly never had oats before. Well, I had oatmeal, and gross. I thought those were meant for horses.
Most biscuits are made using wheat rather than oats, so there's a (slight) difference in taste, and hobnobs have a very different texture. I've always preferred wheat biscuits, never liked hobnobs. By oatmeal do you mean porridge? It's essentially tasteless, so it's all about what you flavour it with!  :P

you guys are killing me.  i just wrote "humour".  like, with a 'u'.

/sigh
It appears there may be hope for you yet!  ;D @Hedin seems to be a lost cause though.  :'(

Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).
Pound is slightly more formal (quid is slang after all), but the difference is so small that there's really no difference. I'm pretty sure that's the situation with "dollar" and "buck" in the US, right?
I wish the world was flat like the old days, then I could travel just by folding a map.

Offline Mr.J

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2015, 08:53:31 PM »
Here is a British question that I've wondered about.   I know pounds and quid can be used interchangeably, however I haven't really picked up on when you would use one over the other (assuming there is a distinction).
Well I'm pretty sure I'm not allowed to refer to the money at my work as 'quid', has to be 'pounds' always since I'm serving customers.

So there's no real rule to it, except that quid is more informal.

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #52 on: November 09, 2015, 09:12:57 PM »
What is a fanny pack?
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Offline m3mnoch

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #53 on: November 09, 2015, 09:23:34 PM »
What is a fanny pack?

something terrible that no one should ever wear.

unfortunately, they do.

it's basically a purse you strap around your waist.



'merica.

Offline night_wrtr

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #54 on: November 09, 2015, 09:24:50 PM »
What is a fanny pack?

something terrible that no one should ever wear.

unfortunately, they do.

it's basically a purse you strap around your waist.



'merica.


A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.

Offline m3mnoch

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #55 on: November 09, 2015, 09:27:41 PM »
A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.

no...

no, you didn't.

really?  you've worn one?!  say it isn't so!

Offline night_wrtr

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #56 on: November 09, 2015, 09:29:22 PM »
A thing that surfaces in old photos that makes us 30 somethings cringe.

no...

no, you didn't.

really?  you've worn one?!  say it isn't so!


Neon, even.

Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #57 on: November 09, 2015, 11:22:52 PM »
AKA Bum Bag in the Uk.

Fanny being Bum in USAian? and slang for vagina in the UK. This is a difference you really need to know.

Offline Mr.J

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Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #58 on: November 09, 2015, 11:27:49 PM »
AKA Bum Bag in the Uk.

Fanny being Bum in USAian? and slang for vagina in the UK. This is a difference you really need to know.
Never heard the phrase bum bag before.

Offline Rostum

Re: Ask a Brit/American what this means
« Reply #59 on: November 09, 2015, 11:54:54 PM »
Hopefully you haven't seen anyone wearing these items either being young.

Ohh Gods they have their own blog with reviews and everything http://www.bumbag.org.uk/