Fantasy Faction

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: The Gem Cutter on August 20, 2016, 05:40:09 PM

Title: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 20, 2016, 05:40:09 PM
Would you like to find out if you know how to lie? Most people don’t.

This is a simple exercise in psycho-linguistic analysis you might find interesting. As writers, you may or may not be skilled liars – which is why I am interested in this exercise (that and I haven’t done this in a while).

This exercise provides some interesting insights - so interesting in fact, that I once met a stranger at a bar and within 5 minutes, we both discerned that we had undergone the same training years before. The principals change the way you look at language. If people play, I'll provide all the details and techniques at the end.

If you would like to play, respond to this post by recounting two situations according to the rules below. I can only analyze the first half-dozen responses. If you violate the rules, you will ruin the exercise, and waste a lot of my time, so please don't. If you have a question, ask for clarification.

1.   If false, the situation must still be “realistic”, i.e., a situation that could have happened, or perhaps did happen, but with the details changed, etc. (This is not a fantasy exercise :) )

2.   Use a real situation that happened, or create one, but either way, the situation must be centered primarily on just yourself and one real person for whom you have strong feelings (good or bad, polarity does not matter). The stronger your emotional connection, the better.

3.   The situation must include a problem or event that should not have happened, minor or major.

4.   For each situation provide the essentials of the situation: where you were, who was there, what you were doing, how long you were there, why you were there, when you arrived and left.

5.   Make the account as long as you like, but no shorter than 10 sentences, and no longer than 1 page or so.

6.   Do not state whether the account is true or false.

7.   It doesn't matter whether you state the “polarity” of your relationship (I really like her; he is annoying, etc.) or not.

8.   It does not matter if you’re “supposed” to like the person – like if you hate your mother, despise your spouse, etc. Hence the warning...

***DO NOT TO USE ANOTHER PERSON ON THIS FORUM, or who is going to hear about this exercise. The techniques do not discriminate between people being deceptive to others and those being deceptive with themselves.

I will analyze the text and should be able to tell you:

1.   If you are being deceptive in each account – whether the account is true. I may or may not be able to tell what you’re being deceptive about, but I should be able to point to the parts of the story that are questionable.

2.   I should be able to tell how you really feel about the person – this is the potentially painful part, so again, don’t use people who will hear about the outcome.

Example:
“I met Mark at the mall right after dinner and we went to the bookstore. We do this every few weeks to try and keep our connection going. It was Mark's turn to pay, and I had coffee and a pastry, but Mark didn’t pay because he’s cheap and won’t pay more than two dollars for coffee. None of my friends were there, but we did see Mark's ex-wife in the parking lot going into the Chinese restaurant across the way. Neither of us bought any books. He likes Fantasy, but I like historical fiction. Unlike him, I only read Fantasy when I have to. He is dieting because he has heart issues and is very overweight and at risk for diabetes. I was sore from a marathon and my wife and I had an appointment in the morning. We left at about 8 in the evening. We were supposed to get my mom a birthday card but we both forgot.”
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: ultamentkiller on August 20, 2016, 06:39:22 PM
I'm going to do this, but I need time to think about it.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Raptori on August 20, 2016, 06:46:06 PM
Quote
3.   The situation must include a problem or event that should not have happened, minor or major.
What exactly is a "problem or event that should not have happened"? Can't work it out from the example you posted.  :-\

Reminds me of an exercise we did in high school. You had to bring in three objects, and for each tell the story of what it means to you. Two of the stories had to be true, one had to be false; the class had to guess which was the false one. Most people sucked at it; not a single person guessed mine correctly.  8)
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 20, 2016, 06:47:43 PM
In the example, Mark was supposed to pay, but he didn't. It doesn't have to be murder or larceny - although that would be AWESOME
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Raptori on August 20, 2016, 06:50:02 PM
Cool. I'll have to think about this. Mostly because there are very few people I have strong feelings towards...  :-\
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 20, 2016, 06:54:35 PM
Surely there's someone you'd either like or dislike to have in the room with you? It doesn't have to be a DEEP or intimate connection, just a strong one - annoying people you know little about certainly qualify! As does that dreamy person who makes your heart skip a beat.

Just remember, there has to be an event that, large or small, did not go as it should have - something wrong done, something right not done, whatever.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Raptori on August 20, 2016, 06:58:55 PM
Yeah of course, just trying to think of someone where it's as strong as possible!  :P
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Lanko on August 20, 2016, 06:59:22 PM
Cool. I'll have to think about this. Mostly because there are very few people I have strong feelings towards...  :-\

Tyranossaurus are the only ones preventing Raptoris their plans of world dominance, aren't they?  ::)
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: JMack on August 20, 2016, 07:05:35 PM
I Somehow doubt Raptori has never done something wrong that affected Saurus.
@Saurus (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40290)?

Of course, since he's not supposed to write about someone else on the forum, I guess his sins against Saurus can't be entered into evidence.

Darn.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Lanko on August 20, 2016, 07:07:44 PM
I Somehow doubt Raptori has never done something wrong that affected Saurus.
@Saurus (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40290)?

Of course, since he's not supposed to write about someone else on the forum, I guess his sins against Saurus can't be entered into evidence.

Darn.

You could tell us about your sins with goats, though! This thread is calling for a certain dark lord...
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: Raptori on August 20, 2016, 07:09:13 PM
I Somehow doubt Raptori has never done something wrong that affected Saurus.
@Saurus (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40290)?

Of course, since he's not supposed to write about someone else on the forum, I guess his sins against Saurus can't be entered into evidence.

Darn.
Well yeah, kinda obvious that it can't focus on her. Otherwise I'd have the opposite problem - far too many to choose from!  :P
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 20, 2016, 11:10:18 PM
oooh!  i'm totally in.  lemme whip out some stuff this fine, fine saturday afternoon.  i can make up all kinds of stuff!

impromptu writing ftw!
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: JMack on August 20, 2016, 11:30:48 PM
oooh!  i'm totally in.  lemme whip out some stuff this fine, fine saturday afternoon.  i can make up all kinds of stuff!

impromptu writing ftw!

I am so glad you taught this old dude what "ftw" means.
I keep reminding myself it has nothing to do with nocturnal acts concerning warthogs. Or... Does it
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 20, 2016, 11:31:47 PM
If the warthogs go in for the win - it might Jmack
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: JMack on August 20, 2016, 11:55:56 PM

JMack at his worst.

JMACK's 1ST STORY

SITUATION 1

So the closest Mrs. JMack and I ever got to divorcing is probably the incident of the Big Screen TV. I'd been whining about size matters for some time, and on Black Friday one year, Mrs. J looked at the sales in the newspaper and said "We could go get you that TV." Well, yeah!

We got to the store, and I lusted for a 3D SmartTV that cost about $500 more than the wife and I had chatted about. I bought it. Turned out it didn't fit in our old-style entertainment center. Which I had known it wouldn't. So I went to a store and bough a lovely wood credenza for it, spending another $500. Now the TV had to go on the wall. Which I certainly knew it did, and knew I couldn't do. Another $300 more.

All this was barely OK, but then we had to decide where to put the entertainment center. Get rid of it! says I. But no, no furniture was to be injured, disposed of, traded, stowed, or discarded in the making of this TV room. The entertainment center went to the front room. The cabinet in the front room went to the upstairs guest room. The chest of drawers in the upstairs guest room went to the sewing room. The furniture in the sewing room was treated with atomic rays so that the various pieces could co-exist in the same space-time moment.

And if this all sounds very funny, bed time wasn't. Because what I'd really done was to recruit everyone in our family to my side by repeatedly pointing out the silliness of not giving up furniture that wasn't needed. Everything else could be forgiven... alsmost. But not public criticism and snideliness.

It's amazing how long a fight can on when you're lying next to someone for hours. You say rotten things, and you forget what you said. Then you deny you said them, and find ways to turn everything on its head so that its her fault. When you're exhausted, and you both turn away to sleep, you feel inches small and miles apart.

Many things in a marriage are things you later joke about. And some things aren't.

JMACK's 2ND STORY

2

"Are you JMack?" asked the camp counselor. "Your grandmother is outside by the cars, and she's crying."

Oh, I thought. And was utterly confused about why, before a brick fell on my head, and I realized. I'd been so excited about getting to camp that I'd run off and barely said thank you or goodbye or see you soon or I love you, or anything. By that time I'd already met a girl - THE girl, I thought, after 3 minutes of conversation, and I really didn't want to deal with Grandma.

I'd stayed at Grandma's the whole summer, earning money at her bookstore. I wasn't a very good employee, since I had a work ethic about the size of a pea. I'd show up, take a long morning break, then a long lunch break, then a long afternoon break, and generally hide in the stacks where she might not see me. I'd been to a week of creative writing camp at the start of the summer - Grandma had paid - and the deal was that I could earn another week of camp at the end. She put up with me, I earned the money - so to speak - and she drove me to Silver Lake Camp once more.

Now she was outside, and I was inside, and I got stubborn and embarraseed. I told the counselor I'd go see her, but I ducked off as soon as his back was turned. I went and got something to eat. I watched THE girl from the other side of the room, and hoped she didn't like that tall guy. Eventually, I looked outside and saw the old VW was gone.

I found a letter recently in which Grandma spoke about how hurt she'd been by my behavior that whole summer. I filed it away.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 12:22:47 AM
i had trouble picking fun stories -- there's one about a drunken night with a bulldozer and another with a full-moon-light-only hike through the sawtooth mountains that didn't make the cut.

in the end, i picked three.  at least one of these stories is fake.  and at least one of these stories is true.  if i need to cross one off because it's against the rules, lemme know and i'll get it down to just two.

otherwise, here we go!

melissa and i and her boyfriend
this is back when i was young -- in high school.  16 even.  it was midnight or so after a night filled with margaritas (yup, still 16) and music.  i had been hanging out with two young ladies (melissa was 22, the other girl whose name escapes me was 21) drinking and dancing all evening.  the other girl (she was blond, thin, but not super-cute or even cool, really) ended up going home in a pickup bed with a bunch of cowboys.

melissa, however, took me home with her. 

so, um.  fast-forward an hour or so, and we're "hanging out" at her house (she lived by herself) when some dude started circling the house, banging on the windows.  shouting things like, "i know you're in there!  your car's out front!  open the door!"

we ignored him and kept "hanging out".

eventually, he had gone away and it was time for her to take me home (remember, i'm 16!) because i didn't have a car or anything.  as we were walking to her car, another car comes screaming around the street corner (i don't remember what kind, but it was a white sedan-looking thing.  she drove a little sporty nissan thing and it was still parked in the driveway.)

so, her boyfriend (who happened a huge body-builder-looking guy) jumped out of the car and started chasing me around hers, looping in the driveway, shouting how he was going to kill me.

melissa was all, "stop, he's only 16!"  mostly because she didn't want him to go to jail for assaulting a minor.

meanwhile, i didn't want to impune her honor, so i shouted back, "nuh uh!  i'm 18!"

he eventually got frustrated and tired of shouting at her and stormed off toward his car.  we took that moment to jump into hers and lay rubber coming out of her driveway.  he saw, jumped in his car, and screamed after us.

we flew down the road (i don't remember where it was) but we were going FAST.  and he was right on our tail.  eventually, we came across a gas station that was open (again, late at night) with a couple cops out front and pulled in.

he kept driving.

after we were sure he was gone, we drove back to my house where she let me out.

we never talked again.

mark and i and the knife
so, back when i was a bartender at a bennigan's in san antonio, we would always have regulars that came in and just hung out at the bar.  (um . . . duh.)  the bar was one of the rectangle ones, sitting in the middle of the restaurant, surrounded on all four sides by cocktail tables.

three feet (a meter or so for you metric people) or so above the wooden counter, were the cabinets -- wrapping all the way around the bar, parallel to the bartop, reaching all the way to the ceiling.  on the inside, where i was, were the solid wood cabinet doors.  from the outside, where customers sat, we had decorative photos and stuff hanging on them.

so, you'd be standing there talking to someone sitting on the outside of the bar, reach up in the cabinet above, yet still in between us, and grab anything you needed.  it was almost like a little fort.

but with more liquor.

it was a monday night, which was typicaly slow and mark was sitting down at the far end of the bar.  i was slicing limes for garnishes (because boring monday nights) and watching the door.

so, mark was an ass.  he was one of our least favorite customers.  and, to this day, i don't remember what he said to me, but it wasn't anything i liked.  it was one of those "i'm a successful tough guy, and you're a loser of a turd" kind of statements.

so, i turned to face him -- he was sitting some 10 or 12 feet away -- flipped the knife in my hand and threw it at the cabinet above his head.

it stuck, vibrating perfectly.  he froze, his beer halfway to his mouth, eyes locked on the quivering handle.  like something out of a movie.

cold as ice, i walked over, yanked it out of the wood, and went back to slicing my limes.

he wasn't ever an ass to me again.

amy and i and the clowns
one day, when i was up at the disney campus in l.a. (technically glendale), my friend amy and i decided to grab some lunch and talk tech strategy.  i don't remember specifically what kind, but at the time, we were co-tech-leads on our project -- she had the client, and i had the servers.  (technically, since the project is live now, i can say it was disney mix)  but, we decided to head over to "the patio" and work it out over lunch.  it's an on-campus restaurant where the chef was hand-picked by john lasseter and it's super-delicious.

we were walking down the back stairs (her desk was on the fourth floor) and she was telling me about an ex-girlfriend of hers who drove a vw bus that was bright pink with a huge blue flower-looking thing on it.  (oh, btw, amy is a lesbian, former-rocket scientist at nasa)  of course, i didn't really think anything of it, because, you know, gay.

*shrug*

anyway.

so, we're on the sidewalk (you have to go out the gate where disney interactive is and into the gate a block away where pixar's offices are) walking to lunch and up drives this bright pink vw bus.  it stops at the curb in front of the houses across the street.  (seriously, who lives just outside disney's campus?  i mean, l.a., amirite?)

amy is all, "oh!  hey!  speak of the devil!"

that's when the front door to one of the houses opened, and a clown ran toward the van.

yes.  a clown.  big red hair, floppy shoes and all.

the side door to the van opened, and three more clowns (they didn't even look to see if cars were coming or anything) piled out, making room for the one from the house to jump inside.  the door banged shut, and the bus sped off.  well, "sped off" as much as a vw bus full of clowns can go.

amy just kept walking like everything was normal, and she never mentioned it again.


p.s.  non-gem-cutter folks, send me a private message if you want to know what's fake and what's not.

edit.  wow -- spelling, chris.  spelling is useful.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 01:11:32 AM
My sons are over for a birthday party, and this will take me several hours, but I will get back to this ASAP
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 01:40:07 AM
My sons are over for a birthday party, and this will take me several hours, but I will get back to this ASAP

of course!  no hurry at all.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 01:48:51 AM
My sons are over for a birthday party, and this will take me several hours, but I will get back to this ASAP

of course!  no hurry at all.

cm n chrs, whr's yr sns f fn? TGC nds t d r strs rght nw!
(And leaving out vowels has nothing to do with anything, except, why nt? )
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 01:51:14 AM

JMack at his worst.

JMACK's 1ST STORY

SITUATION 1

So the closest Mrs. JMack and I ever got to divorcing is probably the incident of the Big Screen TV. I'd been whining about size matters for some time, and on Black Friday one year, Mrs. J looked at the sales in the newspaper and said "We could go get you that TV." Well, yeah!

We got to the store, and I lusted for a 3D SmartTV that cost about $500 more than the wife and I had chatted about. I bought it. Turned out it didn't fit in our old-style entertainment center. Which I had known it wouldn't. So I went to a store and bough a lovely wood credenza for it, spending another $500. Now the TV had to go on the wall. Which I certainly knew it did, and knew I couldn't do. Another $300 more.

All this was barely OK, but then we had to decide where to put the entertainment center. Get rid of it! says I. But no, no furniture was to be injured, disposed of, traded, stowed, or discarded in the making of this TV room. The entertainment center went to the front room. The cabinet in the front room went to the upstairs guest room. The chest of drawers in the upstairs guest room went to the sewing room. The furniture in the sewing room was treated with atomic rays so that the various pieces could co-exist in the same space-time moment.

And if this all sounds very funny, bed time wasn't. Because what I'd really done was to recruit everyone in our family to my side by repeatedly pointing out the silliness of not giving up furniture that wasn't needed. Everything else could be forgiven... alsmost. But not public criticism and snideliness.

It's amazing how long a fight can on when you're lying next to someone for hours. You say rotten things, and you forget what you said. Then you deny you said them, and find ways to turn everything on its head so that its her fault. When you're exhausted, and you both turn away to sleep, you feel inches small and miles apart.

Many things in a marriage are things you later joke about. And some things aren't.

JMACK's 2ND STORY

2

"Are you JMack?" asked the camp counselor. "Your grandmother is outside by the cars, and she's crying."

Oh, I thought. And was utterly confused about why, before a brick fell on my head, and I realized. I'd been so excited about getting to camp that I'd run off and barely said thank you or goodbye or see you soon or I love you, or anything. By that time I'd already met a girl - THE girl, I thought, after 3 minutes of conversation, and I really didn't want to deal with Grandma.

I'd stayed at Grandma's the whole summer, earning money at her bookstore. I wasn't a very good employee, since I had a work ethic about the size of a pea. I'd show up, take a long morning break, then a long lunch break, then a long afternoon break, and generally hide in the stacks where she might not see me. I'd been to a week of creative writing camp at the start of the summer - Grandma had paid - and the deal was that I could earn another week of camp at the end. She put up with me, I earned the money - so to speak - and she drove me to Silver Lake Camp once more.

Now she was outside, and I was inside, and I got stubborn and embarraseed. I told the counselor I'd go see her, but I ducked off as soon as his back was turned. I went and got something to eat. I watched THE girl from the other side of the room, and hoped she didn't like that tall guy. Eventually, I looked outside and saw the old VW was gone.

I found a letter recently in which Grandma spoke about how hurt she'd been by my behavior that whole summer. I filed it away.

boo!  cheater!

both of those stories are fake -- i refuse to believe jmack is anything other than the galant hero i call friend.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 03:31:59 AM
Bear with me, I haven't done this in a long time, and never in this forum which is very funky.
I can't talk about the indicators, or I will teach others how to lie (or how to improve).
Story 1:
melissa and i and her boyfriend

this is back when i was young -- in high school.  16 even.  it was midnight or so after a night filled with margaritas (yup, still 16) and music.  i had been hanging out with two young ladies (melissa was 22, the other girl whose name escapes me was 21) drinking and dancing all evening.  the other girl (she was blond, thin, but not super-cute or even cool, really) ended up going home in a pickup bed with a bunch of cowboys.

This text suggests you knew or know M. well, and felt positively for her.

melissa, however, took me home with her. 

so, um.  fast-forward an hour or so, and we're "hanging out" at her house (she lived by herself) when some dude started circling the house, banging on the windows.  shouting things like, "i know you're in there!  your car's out front!  open the door!"


Beginning with "some dude", numerous issues point to deception here.

we ignored him and kept "hanging out".

eventually, he had gone away and it was time for her to take me home (remember, i'm 16!) because i didn't have a car or anything.  as we were walking to her car, another car comes screaming around the street corner (i don't remember what kind, but it was a white sedan-looking thing.  she drove a little sporty nissan thing and it was still parked in the driveway.)

so, her boyfriend (who happened a huge body-builder-looking guy) jumped out of the car and started chasing me around hers, looping in the driveway, shouting how he was going to kill me.

melissa was all, "stop, he's only 16!"  mostly because she didn't want him to go to jail for assaulting a minor.

meanwhile, i didn't want to impune her honor, so i shouted back, "nuh uh!  i'm 18!"

he eventually got frustrated and tired of shouting at her and stormed off toward his car.  we took that moment to jump into hers and lay rubber coming out of her driveway.  he saw, jumped in his car, and screamed after us.

we flew down the road (i don't remember where it was) but we were going FAST.  and he was right on our tail.  eventually, we came across a gas station that was open (again, late at night) with a couple cops out front and pulled in.

he kept driving.

after we were sure he was gone, we drove back to my house where she let me out.

we never talked again.

There are so many issues in the last 3/4 of the text that my diagram looks like a box of highlights made sweet love all over my desk.

My analysis:
- You consistently indicate a positive mentality toward Melissa. The rest seems very deceptive, particularly the sequences featuring the angry man.
- I assess the overall text to be significantly false, particularly the sequences featuring the angry man and chase. The initial section seemed true, with the delta between the content of the initial section and the rest being the chief indicator of deception.
-Gem Cutter
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 03:57:13 AM
Analysis of "mark and i and the knife"
so, back when i was a bartender at a bennigan's in san antonio, we would always have regulars that came in and just hung out at the bar.  (um . . . duh.)  the bar was one of the rectangle ones, sitting in the middle of the restaurant, surrounded on all four sides by cocktail tables.

three feet (a meter or so for you metric people) or so above the wooden counter, were the cabinets -- wrapping all the way around the bar, parallel to the bartop, reaching all the way to the ceiling.  on the inside, where i was, were the solid wood cabinet doors.  from the outside, where customers sat, we had decorative photos and stuff hanging on them.

so, you'd be standing there talking to someone sitting on the outside of the bar, reach up in the cabinet above, yet still in between us, and grab anything you needed.  it was almost like a little fort.

but with more liquor.

The text above featured few indications of deception. The lengthy set-up (for an account) is consistent with a writer framing a story. There is a logical flow and consistent level of detail.


it was a monday night, which was typicaly slow and mark was sitting down at the far end of the bar.  i was slicing limes for garnishes (because boring monday nights) and watching the door.

From the outset, indications of negativity between you and Mark.

so, mark was an ass.  he was one of our least favorite customers.  and, to this day, i don't remember what he said to me, but it wasn't anything i liked.  it was one of those "i'm a successful tough guy, and you're a loser of a turd" kind of statements.

Further indications of negativity: name calling, expansion of those distant from Mark. Distancing of you from his statement (its absence, replacement with "it" the shortest possible word). Failing to clearly even call it a statement or recall the "statement" indicates strong negativity and/or possibility it was not a statement, without suggestion of what it might have been. Inconsistencies suggest possibility of deception.

so, i turned to face him -- he was sitting some 10 or 12 feet away -- flipped the knife in my hand and threw it at the cabinet above his head.

Further, strong indications of negativity between you and Mark (besides the knife act). Some indications of deception.

it stuck, vibrating perfectly.  he froze, his beer halfway to his mouth, eyes locked on the quivering handle.  like something out of a movie.

Significant but limited indications of deception.

cold as ice, i walked over, yanked it out of the wood, and went back to slicing my limes.
he wasn't ever an ass to me again.


Continued indications of negativity between you and Mark.
- My analysis indicates much of this text is true.
- Consistent indications of negativity between you and Mark suggest he is a real person whom you do not like or trust.
- Absence of Mark's statement and other signs indicate he may not have made a statement as described. There might have been non-verbal communication, for example.
- Areas of deception seem centered around your responses to Mark's statement, and/or his reaction to your response, if there was a statement made.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 04:14:13 AM
Analysis of "amy and i and the clowns"
one day, when i was up at the disney campus in l.a. (technically glendale), my friend amy and i decided to grab some lunch and talk tech strategy.  i don't remember specifically what kind, but at the time, we were co-tech-leads on our project -- she had the client, and i had the servers.  (technically, since the project is live now, i can say it was disney mix)  but, we decided to head over to "the patio" and work it out over lunch.  it's an on-campus restaurant where the chef was hand-picked by john lasseter and it's super-delicious.

Strong indications of positivity between you and Amy. Some issues exist here but I am too rusty to analyze them reliably. Seems some sensitivity around the project, might not be deceptive, just sensitive issues below the surface.

we were walking down the back stairs (her desk was on the fourth floor) and she was telling me about an ex-girlfriend of hers who drove a vw bus that was bright pink with a huge blue flower-looking thing on it.  (oh, btw, amy is a lesbian, former-rocket scientist at nasa)  of course, i didn't really think anything of it, because, you know, gay.

Continued indications of a positive relationship.

*shrug*
anyway.
so, we're on the sidewalk (you have to go out the gate where disney interactive is and into the gate a block away where pixar's offices are) walking to lunch and up drives this bright pink vw bus.  it stops at the curb in front of the houses across the street.  (seriously, who lives just outside disney's campus?  i mean, l.a., amirite?)

amy is all, "oh!  hey!  speak of the devil!"

that's when the front door to one of the houses opened, and a clown ran toward the van.

yes.  a clown.  big red hair, floppy shoes and all.

the side door to the van opened, and three more clowns (they didn't even look to see if cars were coming or anything) piled out, making room for the one from the house to jump inside.  the door banged shut, and the bus sped off.  well, "sped off" as much as a vw bus full of clowns can go.

amy just kept walking like everything was normal, and she never mentioned it again.
My analysis:
- Consistently positive signals indicate you know Amy and like her.
- Absence of any indications of deception beyond the opening paragraph, which were inconsistent and unclear.
- Overall, I asses this text to be true, with potential for some deception (probably via incompleteness) in the first para.

Let me know how I did!
-Gem Cutter
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 04:47:06 AM

Analysis of JMACK's 1ST STORY


So the closest Mrs. JMack and I ever got to divorcing is probably the incident of the Big Screen TV. I'd been whining about size matters for some time, and on Black Friday one year, Mrs. J looked at the sales in the newspaper and said "We could go get you that TV." Well, yeah!

Indications of positivity between you and your wife.

We got to the store, and I lusted for a 3D SmartTV that cost about $500 more than the wife and I had chatted about. I bought it. Turned out it didn't fit in our old-style entertainment center. Which I had known it wouldn't. So I went to a store and bough a lovely wood credenza for it, spending another $500. Now the TV had to go on the wall. Which I certainly knew it did, and knew I couldn't do. Another $300 more.

Mixed indications of relationship positivity/stress. Indications of in-text deception (i.e., between you and the wife at the time).

All this was barely OK, but then we had to decide where to put the entertainment center. Get rid of it! says I. But no, no furniture was to be injured, disposed of, traded, stowed, or discarded in the making of this TV room. The entertainment center went to the front room. The cabinet in the front room went to the upstairs guest room. The chest of drawers in the upstairs guest room went to the sewing room. The furniture in the sewing room was treated with atomic rays so that the various pieces could co-exist in the same space-time moment.


Strong indications of stress and negativity between you (fading) and your (now absent) wife.

And if this all sounds very funny, bed time wasn't. Because what I'd really done was to recruit everyone in our family to my side by repeatedly pointing out the silliness of not giving up furniture that wasn't needed. Everything else could be forgiven... alsmost. But not public criticism and snideliness.

Indications of stress. Additional indications of in-text deception. Stress level very high. Strong indications of negativity between you and you wife, whose continued absence makes me worry for her safety  :-X
Expressions of your guilt (overt and subtextual).

It's amazing how long a fight can on when you're lying next to someone for hours. You say rotten things, and you forget what you said. Then you deny you said them, and find ways to turn everything on its head so that its her fault. When you're exhausted, and you both turn away to sleep, you feel inches small and miles apart.
Many things in a marriage are things you later joke about. And some things aren't.

Strong indications of stress, guilt, anger, extreme negativity.

My analysis:
- I assess this story as true, but very stressful (shame, fear, guilt, anger, frustration, etc.)
- Absence of linkage between stress and deception (absent) and between stress and specific statements indicates the stress is real, although their origins do not appear to lie in this narrative, or at least, not completely.
- Distance between you and your wife is consistent and grows toward the narrative's end, indicating very high stress and emotions, but only shown in one direction (you toward her). Implied imbalance significant.
- Consistency and absence of indications of deception and other factors lead me to assess this text as predominantly true.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 05:18:30 AM

Analysis of "JMACK's 2ND STORY"

"Are you JMack?" asked the camp counselor. "Your grandmother is outside by the cars, and she's crying."

Oh, I thought. And was utterly confused about why, before a brick fell on my head, and I realized. I'd been so excited about getting to camp that I'd run off and barely said thank you or goodbye or see you soon or I love you, or anything. By that time I'd already met a girl - THE girl, I thought, after 3 minutes of conversation, and I really didn't want to deal with Grandma.

Dramatization potentially indicates deception, but not reliably coming from a writer. Indications of negativity between you and Grandma. Possible subtle indicators of someone's deception, possibly Grandma's. Strong indications of deception.

I'd stayed at Grandma's the whole summer, earning money at her bookstore. I wasn't a very good employee, since I had a work ethic about the size of a pea. I'd show up, take a long morning break, then a long lunch break, then a long afternoon break, and generally hide in the stacks where she might not see me. I'd been to a week of creative writing camp at the start of the summer - Grandma had paid - and the deal was that I could earn another week of camp at the end. She put up with me, I earned the money - so to speak - and she drove me to Silver Lake Camp once more.
Indications of deception. Strong indications of emotional distance between you and Grandma (in addition to what is overtly described in the text).

Now she was outside, and I was inside, and I got stubborn and embarraseed. I told the counselor I'd go see her, but I ducked off as soon as his back was turned. I went and got something to eat. I watched THE girl from the other side of the room, and hoped she didn't like that tall guy. Eventually, I looked outside and saw the old VW was gone.
Indications of deception. Strong indications of emotional distance between you and Grandma (in addition to what is overtly described).

I found a letter recently in which Grandma spoke about how hurt she'd been by my behavior that whole summer. I filed it away.
Indications of deception.
[/spoiler]
Overall, I assess this text to be predominantly false.
- Despite linguistic consistency, alignment of peaks indicate deception throughout.

Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: ScarletBea on August 21, 2016, 06:43:04 AM
Wow!
Guys, I was going to ask you via PM, but now that Gem has done his analysis I guess you can say here if he's right or not.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 06:52:53 AM
I'll tell you this: analyzing writers is completely different so far. They are linguistically sophisticated, and they're natural liars. Almost no one is, normally. I expected this I guess, but it was something else to experience it.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 07:01:06 AM
A lesson in analysis:  I was taking this interesting course, courtesy of the military, where we were taught over the course of 3 days to detect deception, primarily in written form.

The techniques are highly subjective but when they work, they work well.  Here's a classic example. They said not to use this stuff at home, but of course, I did just that.

I come home, send the boys off to clean their rooms, ages 7, 8, and 12.

Five minutes later my 7 year old is throwing up in the bathroom.  I go in and make sure he's okay.

"Are you okay?" I ask.

"I guess so," but he's not convincing. He failed the most important test - not answering the question.

"Are you sick?" I ask, pushing along that fault line.

"Dad, I just threw up," he says, like I'm an idiot. Sadly, I had just been taught the difference between a liar (which almost no one is) and a deceiver, which practically everyone is. He expected me to equate "I just threw up" with "yes, I am sick".

"I know you threw up," I ask. "But are you sick?"

He looks at me, again, like I am the dumbest man to ever draw breath. "I just threw up!"

I repeat the question, and little hot-head that he is, he frowns and says "No."

"How come you threw up then if you're not sick?"

"I put my finger down my throat."

Amazed, I ask "Why on earth would you do that?"

He frowns even harder. "I didn't want to clean my room."

I nod. "I admire your will - it must have been unpleasant. And someday, the strength to buck the system may come in handy. I totally get it. But right now, I want you to clean yourself up and go upstairs and clean your room."

And off he went.

So the moral of the story is - attend to the details: avoiding the question is number one.

"Did you kill your wife?"
"What??? I LOVED my wife!"

Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: JMack on August 21, 2016, 11:37:33 AM
Story 1: completely and utterly true in every detail.

Story 2: based on a true incident, but importantly false. I did stay with Grandma that summer. I did a crap job not re-coating her deck. She did go ahead and send me to camp anyway, and I forget to kiss her goodbye or say thank you. But when the counselor told me she was crying I went right out to her and apologized l. No book store, no avoiding her.

I did re-open a letter from her recently in which she was disappointed I moved in with my dad after mom's and his divorce (I was 20, not a kid).

Love Mrs. JMack and loved Grandma, but life and people are complex.

For TGC: an A- 

But wait til @m3mnoch (http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=40419) replies!  :o
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 02:59:05 PM
A-? I'll take it. I took the course in 2004 between trips to Iraq.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 21, 2016, 05:10:29 PM
Bear with me, I haven't done this in a long time, and never in this forum which is very funky.
I can't talk about the indicators, or I will teach others how to lie (or how to improve).

no worries at all, friend.  you're kind of at a disadvantage attempting the exercise with a bunch of people trying their damndest to become professional liars.  but, you're incredibly right -- this is fun!


my responses!

melissa and i and her boyfriend

This text suggests you knew or know M. well, and felt positively for her.

mostly.  she was one of the data entry girls at the place in interned over the summer between my sophmore and junior year.  i totally thought she was hot, tho.


Beginning with "some dude", numerous issues point to deception here.

omg -- it was crazy.  i ignored him.  she ignored him.  we just kept at it.  he was knocking on windows, ringing the doorbell.  ten or so minutes he kept that up.  in.  sane.

yup, quality girlfriend right there.


There are so many issues in the last 3/4 of the text that my diagram looks like a box of highlights made sweet love all over my desk.

quite apropos, i would say.


My analysis:
- You consistently indicate a positive mentality toward Melissa. The rest seems very deceptive, particularly the sequences featuring the angry man.
- I assess the overall text to be significantly false, particularly the sequences featuring the angry man and chase. The initial section seemed true, with the delta between the content of the initial section and the rest being the chief indicator of deception.
-Gem Cutter

100% absolutely true.

being my first time "hanging out", this night was SEARED into my memory.  i had to leave out a ton of details just to make weight -- i suspect that was what you were sensing after the first section.  there was a talking parrot, my bluffing a waitress about my age, vanilla ice, my first experience with a front clasping bra . . .

mercy!



mark and i and the knife
The text above featured few indications of deception. The lengthy set-up (for an account) is consistent with a writer framing a story. There is a logical flow and consistent level of detail.

indeed!  the layout of the bar is crucial to the story.  you needed to know where the knife would hit.


From the outset, indications of negativity between you and Mark.

oh boy, yes.  and not just me.  we had three primary bartenders -- kirsten (our resident hot, barbie-working-on-her-masters, tip-making-tornado) wouldn't even talk to him.  chuck and i had to put up with his crap.


Further indications of negativity: name calling, expansion of those distant from Mark. Distancing of you from his statement (its absence, replacement with "it" the shortest possible word). Failing to clearly even call it a statement or recall the "statement" indicates strong negativity and/or possibility it was not a statement, without suggestion of what it might have been. Inconsistencies suggest possibility of deception.

damn.  that makes me wish i could remember what he'd said.


Further, strong indications of negativity between you and Mark (besides the knife act). Some indications of deception.

oh, i had other acts too.  i had earned the nickname "crazy" from the other bartenders.  i juggled knives, flipped bottles, all the things.

i used to do this trick with a book of matches where i could snap-light a match, and slide the book down the bar so it would stop right in front of the cutest girl lighting a cigarette, single lit match point up.  all she had to do was lean down and light her cigarette.

that trick got me soooooo many "dates".


Significant but limited indications of deception.

. . .

Continued indications of negativity between you and Mark.

srsly.  he never talked to me again.  was great.  but, kirsten and i felt bad that chuck had to deal with him.  tho, he stopped coming in shortly after that.

nobody was sad.


- My analysis indicates much of this text is true.
- Consistent indications of negativity between you and Mark suggest he is a real person whom you do not like or trust.
- Absence of Mark's statement and other signs indicate he may not have made a statement as described. There might have been non-verbal communication, for example.
- Areas of deception seem centered around your responses to Mark's statement, and/or his reaction to your response, if there was a statement made.

again -- 100% true.

tho, i suspect my "cold as ice" may have been a bit of an embellish.  that's what i was desperately trying for, but in my head i was like, "holy shit!  that worked?!?  wait . . . did i just throw a knife at him?  omg!  i'm so gonna get fired!!"



amy and i and the clowns

Strong indications of positivity between you and Amy. Some issues exist here but I am too rusty to analyze them reliably. Seems some sensitivity around the project, might not be deceptive, just sensitive issues below the surface.

on the one hand, this is the most right you've been!

yup, i adore amy.

yup, i was not a fan of the project.

on the other hand, those were purposefully laid clues about true elements.


My analysis:
- Consistently positive signals indicate you know Amy and like her.
- Absence of any indications of deception beyond the opening paragraph, which were inconsistent and unclear.
- Overall, I asses this text to be true, with potential for some deception (probably via incompleteness) in the first para.

this is my liar-liar-pants-on-fire one.  all the stuff that's fake:
- amy and i never had a one-on-one strategy meeting.
- we've never walked down the back stairs.
- since, she's moved to the second floor, but back then, she was on the third.
- she never told me about an ex-girlfriend.
- i've never seen a pink vw bus that i recall.
- much less one with a giant blue flower on it.
- much less one filled with clowns.
- there was no clown running out of any house anywhere.
- because i don't think there are even any houses near campus. (totally going to look next time)

all the stuff that's real:
- yes, we were co-tech leads until i bowed out because you can't have two leaders.  duh.
- yes, the patio is run by lasseter's hand-picked chef and is delicious.
- yes, she's a lesbian, former-rocket scientist from nasa.
- yes, you have to go out our gate and back into pixar's.




Let me know how I did!
-Gem Cutter

lookit me!  m3mnoch, the amazing liar!

however . . .

were this in-person?  boy, i'd fail miserably.  i'm one of the worst liars on the planet -- so bad, that i can't even "white lie" because i still look like a fibbing, babbling porky pig.  just ask mrs. m3mnoch.


speaking of interrogation techniques, tho, have i got a book for you!  it's called "spy the lie" by a bunch of former cia agents and it's fab.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0071NOJ9W/

my infosec friend (high school buddy, best man at my wedding, don't let him touch any of your computers) recently recommended it to me.  he re-reads it every year to stay sharp.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 21, 2016, 05:39:10 PM
I'm lucky I didn't do worse - you were tough to analyze - all your incongruities in the text (incomplete sentences/fragments, etc.) made it tough to process. And I am insanely rusty at this. Even when done perfectly, the techniques do not yield clarity - the intent is to identify areas and issues that should be focused on in subsequent questions.

And being writer is to be a liar - to state things that are not true. Very, very rarely do people actually lie. They dodge the question, lead to false conclusions, play with terms (I did not have sexual relations with that girl), and then there are the more subtle techniques.
"This administration does not do X" sounds concrete - but if the issue is what happened last month, this is a dodgy statement. Verb tense and time in general are critical.

I'll put together a post on the principals - they work on non-liars :)

Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 22, 2016, 06:34:37 AM
As promised, I will share the analytical techniques. I cannot cover them all, but maybe the simple ones. They do work, and if you attend to emails, press statements, etc., you'll see a whole world open up. I will bold the principals.

Most people do not lie, when we hold to a strict definition of "contradicting reality." It's scary and stressful. So we deceive through omission and things like that. Deception is hard, and leaves traces at many levels.

So, to detect deception we have to get inside the person's head - linguistically, and pay very close attention to details and changes. None of the principals below by themselves mean anything. Together, they paint a picture. We can never complete the thought for the subject or assume anything - we never add or subtract. Letting a sentence trail off without finishing is a form of deception.

0. You know the subject is probably not being deceptive when they use "I + singular past tense." This formula establishes commitment on the part of the subject as to what happened.

0.1 By omitting the pronoun "I" (we, or our group, etc.), a subject violates the formula of "first person singular past tense", so there is no commitment, there is no "Total Belief."

0.2 Slipping verb tense is an easy way to deceive. "The President forbid waterboarding" is concrete.
"This administration does not condone waterboarding" sounds concrete - unless we're talking about last month, or last year. (And who exactly is "This administration", does that include the people accused of waterboarding? Is the subject saying: "The government/military/CIA does this, but the administration doesn't like it"?)

0.3 The biggest indicator of deception is not answering the question.
Our exercise should have included a requirement to answer an important question, but I slipped up. My story of my son on an earlier post highlights this well.

The principals below are used to pursue the theories above. These principals are "multiplied" by several factors that give them more weight, consistency being the biggest. Any changes in language occur for a reason. This is one reason writers are hard to analyze - they tend to avoid repeating the same words. They learn to summarize and cut things out/short. A mess for me!

1. Proximity Matters. There are several ways people subtly tell you their level of comfort, familiarity, etc., with others. The most straightforward is distance. The closer the subject (the writer of the text) is to the person in a sentence, the closer the subject is to the other in spirit (not always the reverse). The inverse of this rule tells the opposite.
"I went to the story to buy milk with my wife" is a good example of negativity. We couldn't be farther apart.
"My wife and I went to the store to buy milk." That's much closer.  Prompt someone you know is angry at someone else and see the distance between them in a sentence. Guys, ask that girl about her boyfriend. If she says "I have been living here for a year and didn't know anyone until he asked me out," you are already in the running because she's looking at the door. If she says "We've been dating for X time", move on. Not happening

1. Names and naming are critical. This is not in the usual sense - but in the inner, psychological sense. In my head, "my wife" = Kristine Hamilton, and there are many Kristines in the world, but only one "my wife" in the world, from my POV. A full introduction is called for when we care deeply about people (and are not angry) "My wife Kristine" "My son Zack" etc. Not making a full introduction indicates negativity, distance, etc.

1.1 This usually gets shorter through the text, but it shouldn't get longer. When someone goes from a short introduction a longer one, it could indicate a bad relationship.

1.2 Skipping intro altotogether indicates a weak, bad, or nonexistent relationship. We don't say "My friend Bart", we say "The mechanic told me it was busted."

1.3 Not "demoting" someone from their full name (relationship tag/title + name/nickname) to a pronoun is a sign of closeness, etc.

2. Pronouns are critically important.

2.1 WE = absence of relationship stress (in the moment), maximum closeness. IT = for people is a obviously telling.
2.1.1 The woman who let her car roll into a lake with her two boys in it never used "WE" when describing driving around town, even though they were with her. She used "I", which eliminates the relationship altogether, a telling detail. She only used "WE" when describing the murder - all her relationship issues were, at that point, resolved.

2.2 Pronoun presence/absence is telling. When someone says a name over and over, there's a reason.
"I love Kristine. I bought a motorcycle for her last year from my sister's husband. I would never hurt her." Umm, which "her" would I never hurt, Kristine or my sister?

3. Articles are important in seeing the world as the subject sees or saw it. "He jumped in the car and left. Then I saw him an hour later in a car in front of the bar." Like all changes in language, the shift from "the" to "a" is an issue. Whose car? Some woman's?

3.1 "A" means one of many. "The" means one and only one. When a man tells his wife "I was talking to the girl at work", it is not the same (internally) as saying "I was talking to a girl at work", even if there's only one. Don't believe me? Ask yourself, what makes the girl at work THE girl? Or, ask your spouse :)

3.1 Shifts from articles to possessives is also an indicator "I drove my car to the beach. Got bored, went home, but the car broke down on the way home." In this case, the way I felt about the car is subtly indicated here. I no longer wanted it to be mine - literally. "She drove the car like an idiot .... On the way home, I drove my car." is another indicator, this time, of my attitude - what I hold I own, in my head.

4. Breaks in time in the narrative are important when someone is deceptive, so noticing them is key (but not easy). They can indicate sensitivity and can be a sign of deception. Indications of a break in time (or blank period the text skips over, if you prefer):

4.1 Disappearing subject: He dropped me off and picked me up an hour later. (where was the subject in that hour? Banging the neighbor?)

4.2 He asked me X. Then he asked me Y, and told me I was fat and stupid." Subject's missing - along with her answers/non-answers. Howwwww convenient...

4.3 The way we describe and break down time emotionally can be important. Consider the parent of a murdered child (true story) who said "This was a safe town before, and it's a safe town now." There's a conceptual crack indicated in that sentence when the town was not safe.

5. Relating the past involves no editing, no creation of new information that must be checked for consistency, etc. That takes time and thought. The longer someone takes/needs to answer, the more likely they're lying or being deceptive.

5.1 Stalling buys time to deceive: "Ummmm, I, uh, we, saw ... umm ... a car" the change in pronoun and the time-buying are clear indications of deception.

5.2 Another way to stall is an irrelevant aside "So I left the bar at ... gosh, it's hard to remember ... ummm ... what was yesterday Thursday? Hmmm, well, I know it was after dark. You know how the traffic gets at the end of the day! No way was I going to fight my way through THAT!"

I hope you found this interesting. There's a ton more of this stuff, but I won't bore you with it unless there's interest.
-Gem Cutter

Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: m3mnoch on August 22, 2016, 02:37:04 PM
looking through the list, it seems many of those mirror common lessons in writing quality fiction.

which makes sense, i guess.  making up believable stories and all that.

interesting.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: tebakutis on August 22, 2016, 02:38:20 PM
As promised, I will share the analytical techniques. I cannot cover them all, but maybe the simple ones. They do work, and if you attend to emails, press statements, etc., you'll see a whole world open up. I will bold the principals.

I found this to be a genuinely fascinating read, even though I'm reading it through head cold and Dayquil haze (on day 6 of a nasty cold, now in the recovery phase). I hadn't thought about how these sorts of differences imply deception, but they make sense. I'll probably re-read it later this week when I'm recovered to see how much I retain.
Title: Re: A potentially fun exercise in deception and truth-seeing...
Post by: The Gem Cutter on August 22, 2016, 06:17:58 PM
So I'll continue and this time, focus on a single trait of deception, which I find very interesting, and you should too - because a good story is almost always false. Life doesn't happen in very good stories most of the time - this is why when something happens that IS a "good" story we immediately recognize that it does, and we value these tales for their rarity.

1. So here's the rule: If the emotional arc and the plot arcs align, the narrative is probably deception. Humans are natural story tellers, and we know a good one when we hear one. A good story is one where the emotional peak aligns to the events.  Sadly, real life very rarely aligns this way. In fact, in moments of trauma and drama, it physiologically cannot line up, usually.

When a person is in danger, pain, etc., the capacity for emotion is undermined by the pain and fear. We see this time and again.

Example: Imagine a motorist driving his kid to day care before he goes to work. A huge truck heading the opposite way careens over the median into the motorist's path.  He has few thoughts and or emotions. The human mind can only process a single thing at a time; there isn't enough time; and intensity of the few thoughts and feelings he has makes others temporarily impossible:
      Event - truck hops the median
      Perception / understanding - is that a truck coming head-on into my lane...
      Reactions:   Surprise - OH SHIT! Fear - IS HE GOING TO HIT ME? Horror - My KID IS IN THE CAR
                       *swerves to the side, breaks, drops it a gear, punches gas, and swerves again* (because dad is a bad-ass, sportsman-like driver)
      Response: everything that comes after (if lucky enough to HAVE an after)

Luckily, our motorist swerves and avoids the truck. The danger passed, his thoughts and emotions now bloom. This is when the panic attacks come. Our motorist has to pull over, throws up, and cries. This is a perfectly normal response - and notice the disparity between the emotional arc and the plot.
The world and the subject form a dialogue. One or the other starts things, and they interact through the "plot" of the events.
World: Truck-threat
Subject's Reaction: Limited thought / emotions (in number and complexity, not intensity): fear, pain, relief
Motorist's Response: "peripheral" emotions (not fight/flight): anger, betrayal, regret, sadness, love, gratitude, etc.
Note: response emotions can be "in the moment", but the causes for them should be rooted in the incident itself. "If Margery wasn't such a lazy person, I wouldn't be here, about to die."  This thought is totally legit as a response - it is unlikely as a reaction, because the cause (Margery's work ethic) is absent from the threat.

False claims of sexual assault are renowned for breaking these rules. Someone who has been beaten and bloodied at the hands of strangers, with a knife to the throat and gun to the head does not feel much beyond fear and pain AT THAT MOMENT. Subsequent emotions like hate, betrayal, bitterness, etc. cannot come forward until the pain and fear are gone.

A lie will force the two arcs - emotion and plot - together, which almost never happens. It can, but that would be very exceptional.

Remember to consider this principal together with issues of timing and absent time:
"The truck hopped the median.  Afterward I had to pull over and throw up, I was so shook up." In this case, the missing part is obvious because you remember the story above. But that assumption can be used to manipulate. This line isn't from the motorist, it's from the truck driver ;)