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Author Topic: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"  (Read 7787 times)

Offline Conan

Re: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"
« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2015, 04:27:43 PM »
Clearly this is a sore subject.



 
Depends what you grew up with and what came before, do you call Dragonlance, Belgariad, Dragonbone Chair or Thomas Covenant 'Old School' for example? When I read them they were New or Developing, although I hope in time they will all be regarded as Fantasy Classics. ;D



Dragonlance was in its first printing when I read it. I considered it new school at the time. I reread the series in 1991 while home for Christmas break from college. I read all six books in seven days and then fell into a Dragonlance coma for a month and zoned out of most of my second semester.

In my classic literature forum the the groups are divided into new school and old school by century.

We just finished Beowulf and I would not identify that with old school but instead as a stand alone.

Mind numbing drivel.

c
Tied up and twisted; gnarled and knotted with wrinkles; haggardly firm and unyielding; his eyes glowing like coals, that still glow in the ashes of ruin; untottering Ahab stood forth in the clearness of the morn; lifting his splintered helmet of a brow to the fair girl's forehead of heaven.

Offline Yora

Re: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"
« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2015, 04:30:29 PM »
Wait, are you implying there are only two kinds of fantasy and some other random works?
Beneath the Leaves of Kaendor

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Offline Lady Ty

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Re: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2015, 02:54:37 AM »
Clearly this is a sore subject.



 
Depends what you grew up with and what came before, do you call Dragonlance, Belgariad, Dragonbone Chair or Thomas Covenant 'Old School' for example? When I read them they were New or Developing, although I hope in time they will all be regarded as Fantasy Classics. ;D



Dragonlance was in its first printing when I read it. I considered it new school at the time. I reread the series in 1991 while home for Christmas break from college. I read all six books in seven days and then fell into a Dragonlance coma for a month and zoned out of most of my second semester.

In my classic literature forum the the groups are divided into new school and old school by century.
c

Only sore at journo's attitude in article.

Presume you are referring to all classics and not just fantasy, when do you draw the line between old and new classics? Only for personal interest, often so much discussion about having precise definitions and I never really think it matters as a reader, unless you are an academic or historian. Not keen on genre sub-sub-sub-sub divisions that seem to bother people, but mostly ignore it.

Envy  the indulgence of Dragonlance coma,  but originally did you have to wait impatiently for each one to come out? My son and I fought over who got book first. :) Slightly nostalgic for when there were less to choose, nowadays there is an avalanche and never enough time.  I think Forgotten Realms were coming out then, with  Drizzt Do'úrden, Dark Elf, did you read them as well?

Apologies for my strange edit that got in the middle of your quote, goblins in keyboard again. :-[
« Last Edit: April 07, 2015, 06:32:26 AM by Lady Ty »
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Offline Conan

Re: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2015, 07:01:43 AM »
I remember that the Dragonlance books had their own dedicated shelf for a while and I think some were set right next to the counter at Waldens.
When I got Dragons of Spring Dawning, I couldn't believe I was actually holding it. The beautiful glossy green was like eye candy. The ink was fresh and thick; I felt true joy. It was a sin to open it and put a wrinkle in the cover. The old men smoking their pipes in front of Walden Books and the shelves full of fresh inky perfume....Ahhhh!! Now that's something an eBook can never offer.
Of course smoking is banned now and book stores seem soulless, peddling their cappuccino and knick knacks; just one step away from being swallowed up by the mega-marts of the future.
c
Tied up and twisted; gnarled and knotted with wrinkles; haggardly firm and unyielding; his eyes glowing like coals, that still glow in the ashes of ruin; untottering Ahab stood forth in the clearness of the morn; lifting his splintered helmet of a brow to the fair girl's forehead of heaven.

Offline Elfy

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Re: "The Triumph of Fantasy Fiction?"
« Reply #34 on: April 07, 2015, 08:22:04 AM »
I remember that the Dragonlance books had their own dedicated shelf for a while and I think some were set right next to the counter at Waldens.
When I got Dragons of Spring Dawning, I couldn't believe I was actually holding it. The beautiful glossy green was like eye candy. The ink was fresh and thick; I felt true joy. It was a sin to open it and put a wrinkle in the cover. The old men smoking their pipes in front of Walden Books and the shelves full of fresh inky perfume....Ahhhh!! Now that's something an eBook can never offer.
Of course smoking is banned now and book stores seem soulless, peddling their cappuccino and knick knacks; just one step away from being swallowed up by the mega-marts of the future.
c
Dragonlance initially started with the Hickman and Weis trilogies: Chronicles and Legends. After that TSR farmed the concept and characters out to all sorts of writers. Hickman and Weis later returned and added to the whole thing. I'm not sure how many books were there, but it would have had to go into the 100's when you added everything up. They were good old fashioned fantasy fun. The idea was to write something that read like one of the games TSR sold.