October 20, 2020, 12:41:42 AM

Author Topic: stephen king's The Stand  (Read 514 times)

Offline hexa

stephen king's The Stand
« on: August 25, 2020, 06:09:53 PM »
A new adaptation of stephen king's The Stand will premiere on December 17th

https://www.gamespot.com/articles/stephen-kings-the-stand-new-tv-adaptation-premiere/1100-6481380/

Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2020, 10:58:00 PM »
I can't tell if the timing is really good or really poor.
I'll notify your next of kin... that you sucked!

Offline hexa

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2020, 12:37:30 AM »
Stephen King has said that covid is not nearly as bad as the virus in The Stand.  By December, several vaccines for covid will be widely available



Offline bdcharles

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2020, 11:49:42 AM »
Huh. My wife and I were just talking about a TV adaptation of The Stand (we were watching the 90s one, with Gary Sinise), and how good it would be to have one in series form. That said, King adaptations, in my view, are usually utter crap, solely because from what I can tell the programme makers completely miss the point of what makes King's works what they are.

EDIT: that trailer actually looks vaguely non-rubbish. Then again, a little judicious web TV filtering can make anything look good. I've been burned, as the Trashcan Man might say...
« Last Edit: October 13, 2020, 11:54:59 AM by bdcharles »
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Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2020, 02:28:22 PM »
Huh. My wife and I were just talking about a TV adaptation of The Stand (we were watching the 90s one, with Gary Sinise), and how good it would be to have one in series form. That said, King adaptations, in my view, are usually utter crap, solely because from what I can tell the programme makers completely miss the point of what makes King's works what they are.

In my opinion the problem is ultimate that what makes King work doesn't really translate into a different medium. I think many of his stories ultimate have some major weaknesses, and it's his prose that saves them.
I'll notify your next of kin... that you sucked!

Offline bdcharles

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2020, 03:08:43 PM »
Huh. My wife and I were just talking about a TV adaptation of The Stand (we were watching the 90s one, with Gary Sinise), and how good it would be to have one in series form. That said, King adaptations, in my view, are usually utter crap, solely because from what I can tell the programme makers completely miss the point of what makes King's works what they are.

In my opinion the problem is ultimate that what makes King work doesn't really translate into a different medium. I think many of his stories ultimate have some major weaknesses, and it's his prose that saves them.

Yeah, that may be it. I dunno. For me, something of the feel gets lost. One of the things I've always liked about King's work (I admit I've not read much recent stuff) is the characters and setting. Mostly, I could care less about the horror. The prose is another thing, but I am convinced that, again, a similar feeling can be evinced televisually, because it feeds into character, and because I have seen it done. But maybe it's all subjective. Adaptations just have this sense that the programme makers have overlooked something important. Anyway, we will see.
Find me on twitter @jd_books

Offline Nighteyes

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Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2020, 07:33:21 PM »
Character and setting are so important to King's tales.  One of his most recent novels I just loved the characters and settings but the supernatural element was actually a bit of a shrug for me: Revival.  And actually the most horrific moment wasn't supernatural but
Spoiler for Hiden:
an accident on a freeway early on

I remember with The Stand loving the first two thirds - the characters and setting are amazing, and the description of the virus and the after effects are chilling.  Then it ends up in a good v evil battle, and has one of the worst endings I've ever read in fiction. 
The Real Powers That Be

Offline Neveesandeh

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2020, 09:04:26 AM »
Character and setting are so important to King's tales.  One of his most recent novels I just loved the characters and settings but the supernatural element was actually a bit of a shrug for me: Revival.  And actually the most horrific moment wasn't supernatural but
Spoiler for Hiden:
an accident on a freeway early on

I remember with The Stand loving the first two thirds - the characters and setting are amazing, and the description of the virus and the after effects are chilling.  Then it ends up in a good v evil battle, and has one of the worst endings I've ever read in fiction.

I think that's a reoccurring theme in King's work. The average, ordinary horrors are far more gruesome than the supernatural ones, for the most part. I don't think it's deliberate, though.

The ending of 'The Stand' retroactively ruined the whole book for me. I hated it so much that I dropped the book from four stars to one, and I never want to read it again.

Offline Eli_Freysson

Re: stephen king's The Stand
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2020, 11:15:12 AM »
Character and setting are so important to King's tales.  One of his most recent novels I just loved the characters and settings but the supernatural element was actually a bit of a shrug for me: Revival.  And actually the most horrific moment wasn't supernatural but
Spoiler for Hiden:
an accident on a freeway early on

I remember with The Stand loving the first two thirds - the characters and setting are amazing, and the description of the virus and the after effects are chilling.  Then it ends up in a good v evil battle, and has one of the worst endings I've ever read in fiction.

I think that's a reoccurring theme in King's work. The average, ordinary horrors are far more gruesome than the supernatural ones, for the most part. I don't think it's deliberate, though.

He has a talent for creating intensely reprehensible domestic abusers, psychopathic bullies, sex offenders and bigoted hillbillies. And since all of these things are real they do disturb more than out-there supernatural weirdness. It's the same reason why I, within the MCU movies I feel Winter Soldier has the most tense fight scenes; because they're comparatively grounded.
I'll notify your next of kin... that you sucked!